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Old Oct 12, 2011, 10:21 AM   #1
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Default Shutter Delay / Anti-shock Question

I understand that shutter delay puts off the camera taking a picture by either the 2 or 12 seconds. Useful for "Get in the picture" or hands off the camera to minimize movement associted with depressing the shutter release.

Anti-Shock has me puzzled. I hear the shutter open -- after a 2 second delay -- and then a moment or so later hear the shutter close. To my ear it does not seem to function that much differently from the regular 2 second delay setting.

Looking up on the Oly site they describe it as a method of flipping up the mirror prior to opening the shutter. But on the PENs there is no mirror. So what is going on in this shooting mode?

Might this setting come in handy if I remember to not leave the tripod in the car?
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Old Oct 12, 2011, 11:56 AM   #2
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With the Pen cameras, the shutter is open as you view the image. When you press the shutter release the mechanical shutter has to first close, then re-open and close to take the picture, then open again to re-enable live view. I believe anti-shock on the Pens is simply performs the act of the initial closing of the shutter before the shot is taken.

You can set anti shock to one of several delays. I have antishock enabled with a one-half second delay instead of two seconds. Once anti-shock it turned on, you can access it via the super control panel using the single or burst image box. If you scroll through those settings after turning anti-shock on you will see options with a diamond. Those are the anti-shock settings.

The difference between delay and anti shock is, with delay you have to wait the set time after pressing the release before the shutter fires. With anti-shock it fires when you press the release. It just uses the short delay you set up in your unti-shock setting. In my case, one-half second. There's no need keeping anti-shock set to two seconds. In my opinion that is unnecessarily long for what it is doing. I utilize anti-shock when shooting with the camera on a tripod and using the cable release to fire the shutter so my hands are completely off.
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Old Oct 12, 2011, 12:53 PM   #3
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Which model camera are we talking about here?
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Old Oct 12, 2011, 2:19 PM   #4
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They all offer the anti-shock setting. You have to first turn it on via the menu system to see the options in the single/burst shot box of the super control panel. I have used the anti-shock feature with the E-PL1, E-PL2 and E-P3.
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Old Oct 13, 2011, 12:10 AM   #5
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Sorry James for not mentioning the E-PL1. I have seen this feature listed for the for the Pen family as Greg has mentioned.

Greg, thanks for the explanation of the workings of the Pen's shutter. I did not realize that one could change the delay settings. I don't know why I have never noticed the anti-shock setting in the drive mode control before.

I was shooting from a bridge where past experience has shown that there are too many vibrations from passing traffic coming up through the tripod from the bridge deck. I was going through the drive mode and hit the anti-shock and at least it registered with me enough to give it a try. But surprisingly , hand held the delay was more than I could keep steady and framed.

When home I looked up this setting in the E-PL1 manual where it is brilliantly explained (on page xx Anti-Shock -- see page x; then on page x, for details see page xx)
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Old Oct 13, 2011, 7:42 AM   #6
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I just received my E-PL2 about a week ago and haven't had much time at all to play with it since I'm in the middle of a remodeling job. I did print out a few pages of the detailed instruction book and am amazed at what this camera can do. I still don't understand the anti-shock feature. If you were on a "vibrating bridge", wouldn't it continue to vibrate irregardless of when the shutter fired???
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Originally Posted by KulaCube View Post
Sorry James for not mentioning the E-PL1. I have seen this feature listed for the for the Pen family as Greg has mentioned.

Greg, thanks for the explanation of the workings of the Pen's shutter. I did not realize that one could change the delay settings. I don't know why I have never noticed the anti-shock setting in the drive mode control before.

I was shooting from a bridge where past experience has shown that there are too many vibrations from passing traffic coming up through the tripod from the bridge deck. I was going through the drive mode and hit the anti-shock and at least it registered with me enough to give it a try. But surprisingly , hand held the delay was more than I could keep steady and framed.

When home I looked up this setting in the E-PL1 manual where it is brilliantly explained (on page xx Anti-Shock -- see page x; then on page x, for details see page xx)
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Old Oct 13, 2011, 11:17 PM   #7
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I still don't understand the anti-shock feature. If you were on a "vibrating bridge", wouldn't it continue to vibrate irregardless of when the shutter fired???
Hi James, If I am understanding the anti-shock, it is to create a condition where the actual operation of the camera does not create or at least minimizes any vibrations created by the camera. Think of a 35mm reflex camera -- there was a a method of lifting the mirror and locking it in the up position prior to releasing the shutter. The idea is to minimize the vibrations created by the mirror flipping up while taking an exposure.

As Greg mentioned, the Pen's shutter has a lot of work to do to make an exposure and it might create a vibration that could affect your exposure. Standing on my vibrating bridge would still send the shocks into the camera in addition to the shutter's possible vibration. I shoot hand held on the this bridge and hope that my hands will absorb any vibration from the bridge.

Yes, these are amazing cameras and the manual is a great place to get to know the system. But on the odd occasion I find the manual rather short of complete information (circular references are my favourite annoyance). That's when I turn to other users here in this forum -- there is a lot of knowledge to be found here.

Have fun with the remodeling -- hope you are taking lots of pictures
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Old Oct 14, 2011, 6:25 AM   #8
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Makes sense now that you've compared it to the mirror lock up on an SLR.
Thanks.
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Hi James, If I am understanding the anti-shock, it is to create a condition where the actual operation of the camera does not create or at least minimizes any vibrations created by the camera. Think of a 35mm reflex camera -- there was a a method of lifting the mirror and locking it in the up position prior to releasing the shutter. The idea is to minimize the vibrations created by the mirror flipping up while taking an exposure.

As Greg mentioned, the Pen's shutter has a lot of work to do to make an exposure and it might create a vibration that could affect your exposure. Standing on my vibrating bridge would still send the shocks into the camera in addition to the shutter's possible vibration. I shoot hand held on the this bridge and hope that my hands will absorb any vibration from the bridge.

Yes, these are amazing cameras and the manual is a great place to get to know the system. But on the odd occasion I find the manual rather short of complete information (circular references are my favourite annoyance). That's when I turn to other users here in this forum -- there is a lot of knowledge to be found here.

Have fun with the remodeling -- hope you are taking lots of pictures
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