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Old Oct 23, 2011, 10:38 AM   #1
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Default E-PM1 - Kit lens for portraits/close ups?

Hi all,

I'm completely new to interchangeable lens cameras and about to buy a E-PM1. Looking for lens advice - thanks in advance!

Wondering if the kit lens (14-42 mm) will be good enough for new baby close-up purposes? It looked quite good in store, and I was hoping to get away without buying any additional lenses.

Just saw a good price on a telephoto lens (40-150 mm, 1:4-5.6 R). I wouldn't have thought this would be good for close up portraits, not knowing any better, but the description says 'perfect for close-up portraits or long distant scenes'.

Appreciate any comments on this, thanks!

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Old Oct 23, 2011, 11:19 AM   #2
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The longer 40-150 and the kit lens makes a good combo. With good lighting and the longer zoom, you can take some nice portrait shots with a little bit of shallow dof. The 14-42 does a nice job for casual shooting and landscape shots.
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Old Oct 23, 2011, 12:34 PM   #3
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Hi,

I'm not sure if you're aware, but Olympus is running a promotion now through the end of the month.

If you buy a Pen system, you can buy the 40-150mm lens for an additional $99.00USD.

Here's the link:
https://us.buyolympus.com/digital-ca...hirds-pen.html

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Old Oct 23, 2011, 12:37 PM   #4
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The 14-42 kit lens would work fine for what you want to do. What you need to budget to buy first, rather than a second lens, is a better flash. The little clip-on thing Olympus sells with the E-PM1 sits way, way, WAY too close to the lens axis. You are going to wind up with a lot of flash shots where the light is both too contrasty and there's going to be tons of redeye issues with human subjects.

The 40-150 would be a good lens to have for many type subjects, and getting it the way Zig suggests above is the absolute, best cost-effective way to do it.

The kits lens or the 40-150 are both going to prove to be too slow to use without flash in most indoor lighting combinations, so you need a better flash alternative than the included clip-on unit that will give a more pleasing result and without your child looking like the second coming of Damien.

With a flash like this..

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...t_Digital.html

you can tilt the flash head up and either bounce it off a low ceiling or, if the ceiling is not low, fit one of these..

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...ni_Bounce.html

and your flash light will be much more flattering and redeye will be nonexistent.

I would use the 14-42 kit lens closer to the longest 42mm focal length when shooting images of your baby. The 80-90mm effective focal length range is perfect for shooting (big or little) people images.

The ultimate portrait lens in this system is the Olympus 45mm f1.8. The combination of the the focal length, size (it's TINY for what it is) and speed makes it a very versatile lens for flash or non-flash use. It's one of those down-the-road lenses to think about very seriously when the budget allows.

Last edited by Greg Chappell; Oct 23, 2011 at 2:01 PM.
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Old Oct 23, 2011, 2:22 PM   #5
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Thanks all for this info, really helpful!

I hadn't considered other flash options, the salesperson in store gave me the impression flash wouldn't be so necessary indoors, so that's really good to know. Also that there are some affordable flash options out there.

@Zig - thanks! That's the deal I saw on the lens too & what started me wondering.
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Old Oct 23, 2011, 5:13 PM   #6
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I would also go to dslrtips.com and do their youtube workshops. Also getting a photography book will help you also.
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