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Old Nov 12, 2011, 4:41 PM   #1
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Default Some Fall Color

Captured with the E-P3 and either the 12mm f2, 17mm f2.8 or 45mm f1.8..

12mm f2..



17mm f2.8..



45mm f1.8..





Last edited by Greg Chappell; Nov 12, 2011 at 6:35 PM.
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Old Nov 12, 2011, 6:10 PM   #2
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......really like these Greg.

I wanted to get out today but 'Bonnie had an idea too'. I have to get out soon or there won't be any color left.
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Old Nov 12, 2011, 6:33 PM   #3
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I saw your tidbit about the miniature train show too late or I would have gone over there.
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Old Nov 13, 2011, 10:28 AM   #4
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That first shot is excellent. Did you process with HDR? There's so much detail in the shaded areas...
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Old Nov 13, 2011, 11:00 AM   #5
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Hi, Tullio.

No HDR. Did everything in Adobe Camera RAW. I used the fill light slider to raise some of the shadow values. I tried not to use too much. I think it I set that slider to something like 15 or 20, I'm not home to look. If you slide that one too far to the right it starts looking "HDR'd". Thanks for the comments.

Last edited by Greg Chappell; Nov 13, 2011 at 11:05 AM.
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Old Nov 13, 2011, 11:58 AM   #6
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Wonderful photos, Greg.

I'm new to this forum, but I've read some of your other posts about the E-P3. They've been very helpful.

What settings are you using these days? You said before that you were setting Noise Filter to Low, with Contrast and Sharpening at +1. Are you still using those settings? If so, do you use them across the board, or only for certain picture modes?

Like many others, I'd like to reduce noise without losing too much detail. I'd prefer to minimize post-processing if possible.

(Btw, I'm new to this forum. I apologize if this thread isn't the right place for this question.)

Last edited by Jackpot; Nov 13, 2011 at 12:04 PM.
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Old Nov 13, 2011, 12:53 PM   #7
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Those settings you mentioned are what I have mine set to and what I was using before Adobe updated Camera RAW for the E-P3. Since that update I've pretty much been shooting RAW exclusively, which renders the in-camera parameters pretty much moot, but for shooting JPEG's at ISO 200-400, a Low Noise Filter and +1 sharpening and contrast are what I liked. Once ISO's climb beyond you probably want the noise filter set to Standard. The great part about using the faster primes is, the times you need beyond ISO 400 are very seldom.

If you use Auto ISO like I do, one way you can keep the camera from moving off the base ISO 200 too fast is to adjust the minimum shutter speed in the "F" cogs menu to a minimum shutter speed you are comfortable to handhold at. That menu looks to be strictly a flash shutter speed adjustment, but if you play with the minimum shutter speed you'll note if you set the speed lower, the camera will not start adjusting the ISO to higher settings until the shutter speeds drop down to whatever floor you set with this setting. It was a revelation to me when someone over at DPReview pointed this out. One further way to customize the auto ISO operation of the camera.

Last edited by Greg Chappell; Nov 13, 2011 at 1:05 PM.
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Old Nov 13, 2011, 1:53 PM   #8
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Thanks for the quick response. That's very helpful.

I have the Panasonic 20mm f/1.7 and the Oly 45 f/1.8. Even when they're wide open, I still often need to go ISO 800 or up. Last night, for example, I was at a dimly lit club for a blues show. At f/1.8, the 45mm needed ISO 1600 to get an exposure time of 1/40. I'm very new to all this, but the noise settings seem critical in that kind of situation.

I'll play around with the shutter-speed control, which is also a revelation to me. I had no idea that was there!

Last edited by Jackpot; Nov 13, 2011 at 1:58 PM.
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Old Nov 13, 2011, 8:02 PM   #9
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Nice shots Greg.
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Old Nov 14, 2011, 12:07 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackpot View Post
Thanks for the quick response. That's very helpful.

I have the Panasonic 20mm f/1.7 and the Oly 45 f/1.8. Even when they're wide open, I still often need to go ISO 800 or up. Last night, for example, I was at a dimly lit club for a blues show. At f/1.8, the 45mm needed ISO 1600 to get an exposure time of 1/40. I'm very new to all this, but the noise settings seem critical in that kind of situation.

I'll play around with the shutter-speed control, which is also a revelation to me. I had no idea that was there!
The low-lit night clubs are an exposure nightmare. No way to avoid the higher ISO settings. Saturday night I took my E-P3 and 45/1.8 to a bar where a friend's band was playing. The area in the club where they set up was makeshift at best, and with no spotlights I had to resort to ISO 3200 to get anything. Worst possible conditions to try and shooting something like this.

For what I was doing and who they are for, this worked fine. For regular shooting in lighting like this, you need both the fast lenses and a larger format camera that does a nice ISO 6400 or higher file







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