Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Olympus Micro Four Thirds

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Dec 7, 2011, 9:02 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 6,483
Default A Few Days Before the Eclipse

Sounds like a no-show for us in this part of the world, so we're stuck with just plain 'ol regular shooting....

These cold evenings the atmosphere seems, and I have been told, it is clearer for this type shooting.

E-P3 and 75-300 f4.8-6.7 Micro Zuiko, ISO 200, 1/640 second at f8 and 300mm. Stabilization turned off, with the camera mounted on a tripod and captured using the RM-UC1 release with the anti-shock set to 1/2 second.

Captured raw and processed in Adobe Camera RAW. This is a 100% enlargement.

Greg Chappell is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Dec 7, 2011, 10:05 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
boBBrennan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Arlington, Texas USA
Posts: 3,554
Default

Great detail in that image.

I've never attempted photographing the moon and maybe should try. I need a tripod, a remote release and a 75-300. Of course I have the FT 70-300 but since I'll need to upgrade my Christmas list to Bonnie may as well wish for it all.
__________________
.
boBBrennan .. FB=> http://tinyurl.com/dxlwxfz

.......he likes Olympus, Apple MAC & SmugMug best of the choices; he likes that he has choices

boBBrennan.smugmug.com
boBBrennan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 8, 2011, 8:22 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Wes James's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NE Florida
Posts: 332
Default

Great shot, Greg- almost an excessive amount of detail/texture! Difficult to achieve that without a telescope! *s* (That was a compliment, btw- not a criticism!)
What is the "anti-shock" setting??
Bob- you can use the self-timer in place of a remote shutter release. I'm trying to do some moon shots with my Fuji HS-20, only a couple of attempts so far, nothing I'm particularly nuts about... want to get a good set of AE bracketed images for HDR processing. Have a TCON-17 coming I just got off eBay, that should help. The most critical element is having a really solid tripod to mount your camera on. At the distance of the moon, any vibration whatsoever will soften the image.
Just for fun, here's a link to an amazing moon map:
http://lpod.wikispaces.com/December+4%2C+2011
If you click on the image, it will open to the full image. I'm a "lunartic"- (into astronomy as well) and (after adding the artist's copyright info to the picture in the lower left corner to meet his copyright requirements) am having a framed 20x20 metal print made of this image from Bay Photo to hang on the wall.
Wes
Wes James is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 8, 2011, 8:26 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Wes James's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NE Florida
Posts: 332
Default

Here's another favorite image of mine... this one they simply cranked all the color levels up to bring out what colors there were in the image if I understand correctly... I had this image as my desktop background for some time.
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap060216.html
Wes
Wes James is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 8, 2011, 9:26 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 6,483
Default

Hi, Wes. Thanks.

I have used anti-shock with both my Olympus DSLR's and the Pens instead of using the timer because the anti-shock allows you to time the exposures more reliably. With the timer, once you put it in motion you have to wait. If you're outside trying to shoot a subject "stuff" typically happens while you wait, like a gust of wind or movement that can ruin a shot.

With the Pens, the shutter is open, allowing the subject to be viewed directly off the sensor. When you press the shutter release to take a picture, the shutter first has to close, then open and close to capture the picture, then open again allowing live view to resume. The anti-shock feature delays the exposure between the shutter press when the shutter first closes and when it opens again to take the picture, allowing those initial vibrations to calm down more than they do when taking a regular exposure. The delay is variable. The user sets the delay they want to use and I have mine set to one-half second, so when I press the shutter release it's a one-half second delay instead of using the timer and having to wait 2 seconds or more. The combination of using antishock and a cable release to keep my hands completely off the camera minimizes possible vibrations when shooting and lets you shoot at some very low shutter speeds if needed.

You turn anti-shock on via the menu system. I have it on all the time but only activate it when I want it. Once turned on via the menu system, additional options are added in the advance box on the super control panel. When you toggle through the single, multiple exposure and self-timer options in the advance box of the super control panel, you will see added single and multiple image options with a solid diamond next to it. Those are the anti-shock options you can select any time you want.

Last edited by Greg Chappell; Dec 8, 2011 at 9:29 AM.
Greg Chappell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 9, 2011, 10:33 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
James Emory's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Bay City, MI
Posts: 2,378
Default

Greg, what do you mean by enlarged 100%? How do you know when you have cropped 100%. Just learning some of this stuff. Thanks.
__________________
Olympus OMD-M5, HLG6 grip, Olympus 4/3rd 35mm macro lens, Panny/Leica 25mm, f1.4, Olympus 17mm, Canon Pro 9000 Mk II Printer, Canon MP990 Printer, Slik U212 Tripod, Manfrotto monopod, MMF3 converter.
James Emory is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 9, 2011, 2:57 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 6,483
Default

When I open the image in Adobe Camera RAW, there's a slider at the bottom of the screen that shows the enlargement percentage. When viewing the full image on the screen, that number is around 30% or so. You can open the enlargement window and click on 100% to enlarge the view to where just a small portion of the image is viewable on the screen at a time. In the case of the moon, even at 300mm it only takes up a relatively small area of the image, so I enlarged the image to 100%, then cropped out only the moon and a small area around the moon and saved that as a JPEG. That's how the moon looks so big. If I had just converted the original file, the moon would have looked small and been surrounded by a lot of black sky. You cannot enlarge the moon any bigger than I did here or it will start getting pixelated. 100% is the biggest enlargement you can make before the file start breaking down in quality.
Greg Chappell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 9, 2011, 3:02 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
James Emory's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Bay City, MI
Posts: 2,378
Default

I am surprised it looks that good, nicely done. Also, thanks for the tip. As always, much appreciated.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Chappell View Post
When I open the image in Adobe Camera RAW, there's a slider at the bottom of the screen that shows the enlargement percentage. When viewing the full image on the screen, that number is around 30% or so. You can open the enlargement window and click on 100% to enlarge the view to where just a small portion of the image is viewable on the screen at a time. In the case of the moon, even at 300mm it only takes up a relatively small area of the image, so I enlarged the image to 100%, then cropped out only the moon and a small area around the moon and saved that as a JPEG. That's how the moon looks so big. If I had just converted the original file, the moon would have looked small and been surrounded by a lot of black sky. You cannot enlarge the moon any bigger than I did here or it will start getting pixelated. 100% is the biggest enlargement you can make before the file start breaking down in quality.
__________________
Olympus OMD-M5, HLG6 grip, Olympus 4/3rd 35mm macro lens, Panny/Leica 25mm, f1.4, Olympus 17mm, Canon Pro 9000 Mk II Printer, Canon MP990 Printer, Slik U212 Tripod, Manfrotto monopod, MMF3 converter.
James Emory is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 24, 2012, 8:12 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 105
Default

I know that this thread is a little dated, however I am wondering if anyone has ever strapped the TCON-17 on the end of the 75-300mm for Olympus and shot anything with a Pen. I know that a step ring would be needed, but I figured before I sought one of these out for some extra reach I would see if anyone has tried this before.
mackloon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 24, 2012, 8:46 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 6,483
Default

I would imagine the TCON would degrade at least the corners, if not a little more. It certainly would mess with the quality of the image stabilization. IS was no big deal in the case of the shot I posted above as the camera was tripod-mounted and I had IS turned off, but the image quality hit would be.

I had a TCON-17 I used with a Panasonic FZ50, but sold it along with that camera some time ago.

Last edited by Greg Chappell; Apr 29, 2012 at 11:43 AM.
Greg Chappell is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 4:18 PM.