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Old Dec 21, 2011, 12:13 PM   #21
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They did beef up the E-PL2 compared to the E-PL1. The front plate of the E-PL2 is metal and you can tell. The back plate is still plastic and there's a distinctively different "feel" to the front plate compared to the back of that camera. It's a much better feeling camera in use, and the added dial on the E-PL2 eliminates tons of the button-pushing you have to do in changing often used controls on the E-PL1.
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Old Dec 21, 2011, 1:54 PM   #22
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I agree about the feel. The PL2 reminds me of when I had my Olympus RC35 film camera. The RC35 wasn't much larger than the PL2 and took great photos.
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They did beef up the E-PL2 compared to the E-PL1. The front plate of the E-PL2 is metal and you can tell. The back plate is still plastic and there's a distinctively different "feel" to the front plate compared to the back of that camera. It's a much better feeling camera in use, and the added dial on the E-PL2 eliminates tons of the button-pushing you have to do in changing often used controls on the E-PL1.
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Old Dec 21, 2011, 4:43 PM   #23
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I agree about the feel. The PL2 reminds me of when I had my Olympus RC35 film camera. The RC35 wasn't much larger than the PL2 and took great photos.
Yes, one sweet little camera. You'll like this..

http://cameraquest.com/olyrc.htm

and it's big brother, the RD..

http://cameraquest.com/olyrd.htm
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Old Dec 21, 2011, 5:30 PM   #24
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Thanks Greg. That brought back quite a few memories. In the late 60's I gave that camera to my father and it was the first camera he ever owned. He didn't like anything complicated and he didn't have any problems using that camera. He died quite a few years ago and my mother sold the camera to a relative who really wanted it. Now I wish I would have taken it.
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Old Dec 21, 2011, 5:34 PM   #25
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they can defiinitely still be found, often on eBay. Mr. Gandy at Cameraquest can even service them, including a conversion to use non-mercury batteries.

Not too many years ago I bought a fully serviced and converted Olympus 35SP from him. One of the first cameras, maybe the first fixed lens camera, with a spot metering option.
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Old Dec 21, 2011, 5:59 PM   #26
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When I was in the service (1964-1967) I went to Germany. We had a place provided by the Army where we learned to develop B&W film and print photos. They also taught how to do slides and mount them. I got pretty good at it and I ended up in Division G2 Air. My job was to unload film canisters from F4 Phantoms (Recon) and develop the photos and make large mosaics from them. The Phantoms routinely patrolled/took pics along the East German Border. Even back then, the lenses on those cameras were unbelieveable. From 40K feet you could see laundry hanging on lines and with good detail. The Phantoms were careful not to cross the border so they mainly used their side mount cameras to take photos. The film used was made by Eastman Kodak specifically for that purpose and the negatives were quite large. I can only imagine what one canister cost. The canisters came with film loaded in them and all we had to do was load the canister into the camera housing. While there I bought an Olympus half frame camera. Wasn't real happy with it as I had a hard time finding a place to process color pics. I ended up shooting B&W white and developed and printed from the negatives myself. The resolution wasn't all that great for 8x10s cutting a 35mm frame in half...basically a 16mm negative. I sold that camera in less than a year and bought a Pentax Spotmatic SLR. Now I'm showing my age for sure.
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they can defiinitely still be found, often on eBay. Mr. Gandy at Cameraquest can even service them, including a conversion to use non-mercury batteries.

Not too many years ago I bought a fully serviced and converted Olympus 35SP from him. One of the first cameras, maybe the first fixed lens camera, with a spot metering option.
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Old Dec 21, 2011, 7:46 PM   #27
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Wow, what were those mosaics like, in content? That was quite a period of post-Cuba missile crisis, removal of Khrushchev and replacement with Brezhnev and Kosygin (initially) and subsequent events. I was in high school at the time and ultimately became a political scientist.
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Old Dec 21, 2011, 9:30 PM   #28
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Basically several pictures cut out and matched to others. Photos taken by the F4 Phantoms were timed sequences, so the mosaics were much like our digital panoramas only hand pasted together to form a large image. The lens was moved automatically in degree increments both vertically and horizontally. Of course back then, the word digital was never heard of.
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Wow, what were those mosaics like, in content? That was quite a period of post-Cuba missile crisis, removal of Khrushchev and replacement with Brezhnev and Kosygin (initially) and subsequent events. I was in high school at the time and ultimately became a political scientist.
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Old Dec 22, 2011, 10:43 AM   #29
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For example....I see E-P1 bodies for $279.

Is that one older or newer? More or fewer features?
IMO, the EP1 is the weakest of all m4/3 released to date. It has a very nice (and appealing) retro look and it's solidly built but it does not have a built-in flash unit, poor LCD resolution and worse of all, it does not accept the Oly electronic viewfinder (VF2/VF3), so you'll have to use the LCD. Also, the EP1 has probably the slowest AF system of all m4/3 bodies. So, I'd consider a G1 body as your backup. This is a great camera. It does not do video but it has a flip/swivel LCD, a great EVF, flash and lots of controls. It's a well-thought and well-built camera. If not, then I'd go for an EPL1 (either body only or with the kit lens).
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Old Dec 22, 2011, 9:55 PM   #30
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Gosh, thanks for all the suggestions and the trip down memory lane. I was buying cameras about that time, too.

I remember the Spotmatic, of course. I almost bought one but didn't like the screw-in lenses and went instead with the Canon FT (QL) with the bayonet mount and a monster F1.2 lens. I think it was $109.95 in the Base Exchange.

I remember selling my half-frame Pen to a buddy for $15.

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