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Old Apr 17, 2012, 3:57 PM   #11
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The other thing is, because you need to get very close, you end up blocking the light, reason why having a f2.8 (or faster) is helpful. You definitely don't want the ISO to go up because of noise.
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Old Apr 17, 2012, 4:14 PM   #12
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My application is to take photos of a reef aquarium that is very brightly lit. I shouldn't have a light problem. Trying to decide on which lens now. I see you can get some OM 50mm macro lenses for under a 100 bucks and the OM to M43 adaptor is 15 bucks. I realize the lens is a manual focus and I would have to use manual mode on the camera but I'd probably use those modes anyway, especially with the short depth of field and what I am taking pics of. I don't know if live view will work with that lens either. Not familiar with using legacy lenses on M43 cameras at all.
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Old Apr 17, 2012, 4:25 PM   #13
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james,

Live view works when using legacy lenses. The only thing is aperture will obviously not be known by the camera and not shown to you. You will still have the other readings and the camera will automatically meter in the same way and set shutter/ISO accordingly.

To focus you will find the magnifying button works very well. Even when I use the VF-2 EV-F ( which is very useful for manual focus lenses ) I still use the magnifying button to zoom in and fine tune the focus. It is also easiest to focus wide open or very close to wide open and then stop down when you are ready to shoot.
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Old Apr 17, 2012, 4:56 PM   #14
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The other thing is, because you need to get very close, you end up blocking the light, reason why having a f2.8 (or faster) is helpful. You definitely don't want the ISO to go up because of noise.
the pens as off camera flash, it would well to use the onboard flash to control a off camera flash for macro. That way you can shoot stop down with greater dof.
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Old Apr 17, 2012, 4:59 PM   #15
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Yes but they are 50.00 more than the Viltrox adaptor and do the same thing. A few people on this forum use them and have no problems.
it should work, but there is not allot of long term test on the viltrox. It may work well but it might have issues later. Allot of battery grips for dslr are allot cheaper then the oem. But allot after a while the cheaper construction fails. Biggest issue is they just use a compression crimp vs soldering the leads.

For me, I would not rule out the viltrox, but would hold off judgement till more reviews over time say it works well.
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Old Apr 17, 2012, 5:02 PM   #16
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I would go with the electric system with the pen, put the af to af with manual adjust. The af works very well, and fine tune with mf. It just makes thing go faster and simpler, and if you are shooting something that might leave when it feels like, the shorter setup time is a plus with AF
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Old Apr 17, 2012, 5:21 PM   #17
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Thanks Shoturtle, appreciate your input.
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Old Apr 18, 2012, 12:28 AM   #18
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James
Have you considered the Macro Converter (MCON-P01). Its 59.99 at the CDN Oly store so should be about the same price stateside. You have the 14-42 II lens so it does fit...

Focusing Range: 0.24 m - 0.51 m
Magnification: 0.28 x (Micro Four Thirds)/0.56 x (35mm format)

It may not have the Magnification you might be looking for, but the focusing distance should work as you are shooting into the aquarium. It hits a good price point.

Greg's comment about using tripod with the macro is really on target. No matter how steady I hold the camera, I often rock on my heels ruining the focus. So locking down the camera on the tripod removes one possible error element.

As you note, going manual is probably the best way to go for focus and exposure, so if you have a line on the OM glass and it is a good lens, then not a bad way to go. I use a Micro-Nikkor 55 with adaptor for my close up shooting. As I already owned the lens, all I had to buy was the $30 adaptor. Works for me.
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Old Apr 18, 2012, 8:45 AM   #19
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I tried the MCON-PO1 last fall and the sharpness detail just wasn't there. I guess I was expecting too much and trying to compare it to my old Canon 60mm macro was like comparing apples to oranges. But hey, your not going to get 550 dollar macro performance from a 50 dollar converter. It's not bad though but for not much more, can get a legacy macro on Ebay.
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Old Apr 18, 2012, 10:13 AM   #20
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james,

if you go the manual focus lens plus adapter route you might consider these macro tubes

http://www.rainbowimaging.biz/shop/p...id_product=484

I am thinking about getting these myself but don't fully understand macro photography just yet. I am confused as to whether I still need a macro lens if I use the tubes, seems from what I have read the tubes can turn any lens into a macro lens but I am not sure if this is true or if you really need a macro lens plus tubes?
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