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Old Jul 1, 2012, 7:24 AM   #1
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Default 70-300mm shots, orchids and dragonfly

per zig's request I took the orchids outside yesterday morning, setup the tripod and took some shots with the 70-300mm

P6303802_2 by ramcewan, on Flickr

P6303855_2 by ramcewan, on Flickr

P6303866_2 by ramcewan, on Flickr

P6303805_2 by ramcewan, on Flickr

P6303870_2 by ramcewan, on Flickr

P6303868_2 by ramcewan, on Flickr
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Old Jul 1, 2012, 7:27 AM   #2
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and then this dragonfly (I believe another blue dasher) came along and alighted on one of the branches and how could I resist such a ham, I think it's smiling

P6303812_2 by ramcewan, on Flickr

P6303814_2 by ramcewan, on Flickr
psst come a little closer

P6303815_2 by ramcewan, on Flickr
side image - the stuff around it's face is not CA, just fuzzy hairs..

P6303845_2 by ramcewan, on Flickr
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Old Jul 1, 2012, 10:36 AM   #3
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Love the dragon fly shots but something doesn't seem quite right with the orchids but I can't put my finger on it.
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Old Jul 1, 2012, 10:48 AM   #4
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The dark background fooled the metering system, overexposing the orchids. Spot-metering on the orchids themselves would have been one solution.
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Old Jul 1, 2012, 10:56 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Chappell View Post
The dark background fooled the metering system, overexposing the orchids. Spot-metering on the orchids themselves would have been one solution.
Ahah!!! This thread reminds me of the Jimmy Gilley lyrics "I overlooked an orchid while search for a rose".. Seems like I remember a Gilley's Roadhouse being somewhere in your area Greg.
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Old Jul 1, 2012, 4:51 PM   #6
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Thanks guys for the comments and tips. I will try spot metering next time. I also felt the orchids were lacking... they are cool flowers but the subtle nature of their detail is proving challenging.
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Old Jul 2, 2012, 12:39 AM   #7
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Sometimes taking the spot and waving it around the item all of a sudden it will just "hit" perfectly, you lock the exposure while it looks great, recompose and shoot. Electronic finders have made using spot metering super easy because you see what the item is going to look like before you ever press the shutter release. If it does not look right in the finder, make a change because the recorded image is not going to look right, just like the finder was showing you before you ever took the shot.

Sometimes, you have to combine spot metering with exposure compensation. If you spot meter something white or light-colored you often have to add something like +.3 or +.7 EV compensation to keep it light or white. If it's dark you use negative exposure compensation to keep it that way.

Whether it is spot metering or multi-segment metering, meters are always looking to average the area being metered, so if the item is light or dark, you have to make the adjustment by adding more exposure or taking away exposure to get it "right" or the item will not come out looking the way you want it to look.

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Old Jul 2, 2012, 6:31 AM   #8
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Good morning,

Thanks for taking the time to set up an use the 70-300mm+E-PL1.

In addition to what Greg has already suggested, If I can add the following;

Almost all my flower shots are taken in full or mottled shade. Reason being, the shadows, which occur in full sun, are no longer an issue in shade. Additionally, the metering system is less apt to be fooled into getting a false read.

I also use ISO100 along with an aperture of f8 to f11, which should work well with the 70-300mm since that tends to be the sweet spot for the lens. In shade, these settings should have you using a very slow shutter speed. 1/5sec. up to 1.50sec. but should not be an issue with flowers as they are static. (doesn't quite work with dragon flies unless they are really stationary).

By the way, the dragon fly images are very nice.

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Old Jul 3, 2012, 5:44 PM   #9
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Wow, the dragonflies are really great shots, and fun too.
Picking up on Greg and Zig's comments, if I take the tripod out into the garden, then I will also take a gray card for the exposure readings. The orchids have a really reflective surface so they can easily dazzle your meter. No gray card handy, meter the back of your hand in the same light.
And then to tone the harshness of the outdoor light, a four foot diffuser or a light tent really comes in handy -- what doesn't everyone carry a 10 foot by 10 foot light tent around with them?
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