Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Olympus Micro Four Thirds

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jul 16, 2012, 11:01 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: New England, USA
Posts: 2,069
Default flowers and dragonfly

135 f2.8 Tamron MD mount.. kinda meh about this lens, good thing I only paid $13 this was the only one I liked from a bunch of shots. Might need to try a tripod and some long exposure times..


50mm f1.8 Hexanon for the rest






__________________
in my bag: e-m1, 7-14mm pro, 14-54mm mk ii, 50-200mm mk i, 70-300mm
in my pocket: e-pm2 lumix 12-32
ramcewan is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jul 16, 2012, 12:28 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
James Emory's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Bay City, MI
Posts: 2,378
Default

Looks a little soft and too low an f/stop. Are these manually focused? Other than that, nice composition.
__________________
Olympus OMD-M5, HLG6 grip, Olympus 4/3rd 35mm macro lens, Panny/Leica 25mm, f1.4, Olympus 17mm, Canon Pro 9000 Mk II Printer, Canon MP990 Printer, Slik U212 Tripod, Manfrotto monopod, MMF3 converter.
James Emory is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 18, 2012, 12:12 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: New England, USA
Posts: 2,069
Default

Yes James these are all manually focused and handheld. I think when I hand hold often times I move after locking focus and it goes a little soft.

On the second shot I also tried isolating the background and darkening it along with blurring it to get the focus on the flower. I am afraid it didn't turn out the way I hoped, instead appearing to be underexposed. I will have to try adjusting or shooting it again with a better background.

I really need to learn how to spot meter exposure..
__________________
in my bag: e-m1, 7-14mm pro, 14-54mm mk ii, 50-200mm mk i, 70-300mm
in my pocket: e-pm2 lumix 12-32
ramcewan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 18, 2012, 12:23 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
James Emory's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Bay City, MI
Posts: 2,378
Default

I'm in your boat. Maybe 10% of the pictures I take, I would consider pretty good, the rest average or below. Like you, I need to learn more if I want to take exceptionally nice photos and we can't learn by not shooting and experimenting, that's for sure.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramcewan View Post
Yes James these are all manually focused and handheld. I think when I hand hold often times I move after locking focus and it goes a little soft.

On the second shot I also tried isolating the background and darkening it along with blurring it to get the focus on the flower. I am afraid it didn't turn out the way I hoped, instead appearing to be underexposed. I will have to try adjusting or shooting it again with a better background.

I really need to learn how to spot meter exposure..
__________________
Olympus OMD-M5, HLG6 grip, Olympus 4/3rd 35mm macro lens, Panny/Leica 25mm, f1.4, Olympus 17mm, Canon Pro 9000 Mk II Printer, Canon MP990 Printer, Slik U212 Tripod, Manfrotto monopod, MMF3 converter.
James Emory is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 18, 2012, 12:52 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: New England, USA
Posts: 2,069
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by James Emory View Post
I'm in your boat. Maybe 10% of the pictures I take, I would consider pretty good, the rest average or below. Like you, I need to learn more if I want to take exceptionally nice photos and we can't learn by not shooting and experimenting, that's for sure.
Yes, I totally agree. This was an example of me saying to myself, "You haven't used the camera in at least a week, pick it up and go see what you can find to shoot!" ... luckily for me we know a landscaper who has advised us on selecting plants that will keep something blooming year round (spring-late summer and then we have autumn foliage, winter is obviously blah) and as a result I always have flowers to shoot. I'm also finding it very easy to find dragonflies like this one perched on things more than willing to sit for a few shots. This day I went out expressly to shoot flowers to try the 135mm Tamron, I ended up shooting with it for a while and then not being happy so I switched to the 50mm Hex... The more I shoot with the 40-50mm range of lenses the more I am convinced I must acquire the Olympus 45mm f1.8. I was sorely disappointed that the current Olympus summer sale doesn't include a rebate on this lens
__________________
in my bag: e-m1, 7-14mm pro, 14-54mm mk ii, 50-200mm mk i, 70-300mm
in my pocket: e-pm2 lumix 12-32

Last edited by ramcewan; Jul 18, 2012 at 1:03 PM.
ramcewan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 18, 2012, 1:03 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
James Emory's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Bay City, MI
Posts: 2,378
Default

And I am now leaning toward just using fixed focal length lenses. Seems like the IQ is better with fixed than with zooms....comparable price being in the equation. The Oly 35mm macro was the last lens I bought and I'm finding it hard not to take it off my camera. If you like shooting flowers, this is an exceptional lens for that, razor sharp, nice color saturation and contrast. I haven't used my camera in over a week. It's either hotter than a pizza oven or it's gloomy like today. Doesn't do much for bright colors at all. Tomorrow I think I'll go to the river and see if I can capture some nice shots with the 35mm macro and the 40-150 M43. I bought the 40-150 probably three months ago and the only shot I took with it was to ensure that it worked.
__________________
Olympus OMD-M5, HLG6 grip, Olympus 4/3rd 35mm macro lens, Panny/Leica 25mm, f1.4, Olympus 17mm, Canon Pro 9000 Mk II Printer, Canon MP990 Printer, Slik U212 Tripod, Manfrotto monopod, MMF3 converter.
James Emory is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 18, 2012, 1:06 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: New England, USA
Posts: 2,069
Default

I've adjusted the exposure on these







__________________
in my bag: e-m1, 7-14mm pro, 14-54mm mk ii, 50-200mm mk i, 70-300mm
in my pocket: e-pm2 lumix 12-32
ramcewan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 18, 2012, 1:46 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
James Emory's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Bay City, MI
Posts: 2,378
Default

Nice. Next time I try shooting subjects like this I'm going to get a piece of the black poster board like Greg or Zig uses. I guess they aren't expensive at Michaels and we have one of those stores a few miles from here. Hobby Lobby might have them also.
__________________
Olympus OMD-M5, HLG6 grip, Olympus 4/3rd 35mm macro lens, Panny/Leica 25mm, f1.4, Olympus 17mm, Canon Pro 9000 Mk II Printer, Canon MP990 Printer, Slik U212 Tripod, Manfrotto monopod, MMF3 converter.
James Emory is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 18, 2012, 5:28 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
zig-123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Posts: 5,145
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by James Emory View Post
Nice. Next time I try shooting subjects like this I'm going to get a piece of the black poster board like Greg or Zig uses. I guess they aren't expensive at Michaels and we have one of those stores a few miles from here. Hobby Lobby might have them also.
If I may also interject, A critical component of shooting close ups, I've found, is the use of a tripod. Now, it doesn't have to be an expensive carbon fibre model or something equally as expensive, a simple straight forward 'pod' that provides a steady foundation for the Pen camera is just fine. And, if you still want to go a step further to isolate the camera from any blur caused by vibration, use the 12 sec timer on the shutter release.

The added clarity achieved thru the use of these two simple steps will surprise you.

By the way, a good way to practice taking closeups of flowers etc. is to take a cutting, bring it inside the house and take a series of photos under controlled conditions. Try using a flash, artificial light, etc. and then compare your results
It is a great way to better understand what you can actually do with your various lenses and the sharpness they provide.

When you can eliminate the variables, i.e. camera shake, wind, harsh sun, etc.
all of a sudden your lenses start looking better.

just my 2cents.
__________________
http://scortoncreekgallery.smugmug.com/

So you want to be a better photographer? Open your eyes and take a look at what is all around you.
zig-123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 18, 2012, 6:24 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
James Emory's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Bay City, MI
Posts: 2,378
Default

Zig, your two cents is worth many dollars to me. Your information/tips are invaluable.
__________________
Olympus OMD-M5, HLG6 grip, Olympus 4/3rd 35mm macro lens, Panny/Leica 25mm, f1.4, Olympus 17mm, Canon Pro 9000 Mk II Printer, Canon MP990 Printer, Slik U212 Tripod, Manfrotto monopod, MMF3 converter.
James Emory is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 1:15 AM.