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Old Jul 19, 2012, 10:13 AM   #1
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Default What would you carry with you?

I'm going on a trip to Michigan in a few weeks, mostly to do some hiking and other touristy things around the lakes. I have a pretty nice thrift-store Minolta camera bag that will fit most of the stuff I have, but am thinking I'm going to want to pare it down when I'm out and about.

Here's what I have:
E-PL2 with kit lens
Panasonic 45-200
Panasonic 14mm
Yashica 50mm 2.0
Konica 57mm 1.4
Raynox DCR-250 macro attachment from my old FZ35
Gorillapod
SLIK Sprint Pro tripod

My first thought is to have the 45-200 on the camera and the 14mm in the pocket. However, I've been a little frustrated with the tele at times and wonder if I should take the kit lens instead. The legacy "normals" are an option too, but frankly I'm still getting the hang of the whole MF thing and wonder if I'll miss things without the aid of a viewfinder (esp considering i'll have some very impatient nieces along). Haha.

Is there any bag advice for a setup like this? I would hope for something not too large but could keep my hands free and not swing around, and hold a few lenses and maybe a battery and such.

I know nobody can concretely answer that for me--I was just wondering what your first thoughts/experiences were, or if there's something I haven't considered here, or if anybody has any advice.

Last edited by SammyKhalifa; Jul 19, 2012 at 10:16 AM.
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Old Jul 19, 2012, 12:28 PM   #2
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I like the Crumpler 4 million dollar home bag, it fits my e-pl2, vf-2, 45-200mm, 14mm, 14-42mm, wireless shutter release, jupiter-8 with adapter, a few filters, extra batteries (2), and an extra SD card. It is a bit pricey but worth it for a camera sling bag. Not sure how it would work hiking.

As for what to bring I would put the 45-200mm on the camera and/or the 14mm at all times. I took only a few photos with the 14-42mm on my last vacation and wasn't very happy with them to be honest.

Legacy lenses I would leave at home unless you have one in particular you really like the focal length of.

I'd bring the gorilla pod and a monopod instead of the tripod a full size tripod is going to be a pain to carry, a monopod doubles as a walking stick and can easily be collapsed and tucked away. The gorilla pod can handle the times you need full support.

I'd also throw in a wired shutter release if you want to do any landscapes. RM-UC1 is the official OEM version but Pixel makes a $6 version that works just as well.
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Last edited by ramcewan; Jul 19, 2012 at 12:30 PM.
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Old Jul 19, 2012, 12:51 PM   #3
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I'd take the kit lens, 14mm, Panny telly, Gorillapod, and just a monopod as Ramce stated. So you are coming to my neck of the woods, eh?
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Old Jul 19, 2012, 1:23 PM   #4
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Subject matter could encompass anything over any distance so I would look to have the widest selection of optics with the least overlap, unless you carry an extra prime for speed over a slower zoom.

The biggest weight issue would be with your tripod. Unless you see a real need for it, or have an easy way of totting it, I'd leave that at home.

Although you've had problems with it, not having the 45-200 available would be a mistake in my opinion, and the 14mm Panasonic is a great lens to just have on the camera for most any landscape or low light opportunity. Both the 14mm Panasonic and the 14-42 kit lenses are just way too easy to carry to not have them both along since they and the 45-200 give you an unending range of 14-200mm.

As far as the manual focus primes go...well...that's your call. I don't know how much you use them.

A Bag? I usually can't even make that decision for myself, let alone someone else. Right now I am pretty settled on two bags, depending on how big the outfit is I am carrying. The Thank Tank Retrospective 5 for small three lens setups (worked great for walking/riding the Metro in the city of Paris), or the Think Tank Retrospective 7 for bigger five lens outfits.
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Old Jul 19, 2012, 7:45 PM   #5
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Do you want to consider carrying your camera gear in a backpack vs a shoulder bag? I'd carry the 45-200 for sure if I was you, even if you;ve had issues with it in the past there will be times when you need the longest zoom reach you have then want more reach.........

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Old Jul 19, 2012, 8:05 PM   #6
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I would use a backpack. I have this bag in green and use it on day hiking trips all the time:

http://www.zappos.com/the-north-face...monarch-orange

I put the camera in the back pocket, which is split in two, so you could fit lenses in there too I bet. There is an outer mesh pocket as well, and a small upper pocket that could easily fit an extra battery and a prime lens.

If you have something similar, I would just go with this. Wearing a side hanging, camera bag with a backpack while hiking would be annoying and will get in the way of the other bag I presume you would still have to carry. I don't know how long your hikes are going to last, but if they are long, you need food and water obviously.
I just fill the inside main compartment with my food and water, and the smaller pockets house the camera gear.

For backpacking trips it's almost the same. The top portion of my pack (the fold down flap) houses my camera and other accessories in a small waterproof bag, which I then just shove some shirts around for protection. The main gear is in the bag itself.
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Old Jul 20, 2012, 10:26 AM   #7
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I went to Hawaii a little over a month ago. I took my G3, EPL1 and Sony HX20. As for lenses, I took the Lumix kit 14-45mm, the 45-200mm (used both with the G3) and the Rokkinon fisheye dedicated to the EPL1. I used the HX20 for most landscape shots (what a great little cam that is!). The 45-200mm was mounted on the G3 most of the time. I get excellent results with it. I did not take my tripod & monopod (and did not miss them at all). I never take my MF lenses on family trips. Even though I like some of my old glasses, I find that the keepers vs. discard ratio is not that great and does not justify the extra weight. The IQ I get with them is never superior than what I get with the m4/3 lenses.
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Old Jul 20, 2012, 2:21 PM   #8
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Thanks everyone! I'm thinking right now that the best combo for out-and-about is the 14mm+45-200, but I think I'll also bring my bag with a few other items and just leave it in the car. I don't know that I'll miss the range that the kit lens gives or not. I don't think we'll be doing much backpacking (mostly day hikes), but I'm kind of just along for the ride on this trip so we'll see. You all also have a point about the old lenses--I'll probably end up not using them anyhow. They're fun inexpensive flea market finds though!

I don't know what it is about the 45-200, the pictures just don't always look that good/sharp but I'm sure it's me and not the lens. Mostly I think I need to practice with the tele to learn how to get it to focus on what I want to focus on instead of the branches behind it. Been meaning to do that, but since the 14 showed up I can't seem to take it off of the camera. I wouldn't have thought it would be that different than using the kit lens, but there you go.

I also just picked up a car charger and extra battery, and I do also have a remote shutter that I picked up on ebay for like $3.80. Hey, it works for now so I won't knock it. Monopod's an interesting idea, and heck I don't think there will ever be a bag everyone likes. Ha.
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Old Jul 20, 2012, 3:05 PM   #9
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SammyKhalifa - the key to the 45-200mm is to use it in single point autofocus and bring up the zoom box with the magnifying glass, make it as small as it will go (14x) (there is a sticky thread on this http://forums.steves-digicams.com/ol...n-epl-1-a.html ), and then place it on the subject and focus. This will allow you to focus on the subject and not the branches.

The thing I found beyond the extra weight of legacy glass and the lower keeper/discard ratio is the added time it takes to use them. When on a vacation and you are snapping away shot after shot the rest of your group may get a little impatient waiting for you to finish up and put the camera away so they can get moving. This impatience is only exasperated by the use of MF lenses which require more time to set the aperture, focus, and then maybe stop down the aperture. I carry my Jupiter-8 lens in my bag because it is a rangefinder lens and therefore small as the kit lens collapsed, it also has wonderful image quality and at 50mm is a nice focal length that I don't have another prime in... that said when I used it on vacation it was the lens that took the longest to make a shot with and also the hardest to get a good shot with.

Here's what I mean about size;


oly_14-42_v_jupiter8_m39 by ramcewan, on Flickr
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Old Jul 20, 2012, 5:00 PM   #10
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I think having the 14mm and 45-200mm is a good choice. If you want anything in between, just crop the image from the 14mm shot. The 45-200mm will give you a good portrait option at 45mm. It's a very sharp lens up to 120mm. At 200mm it can be a bit soft but still I find it to be a great performer.
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