Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Olympus Micro Four Thirds

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Aug 31, 2012, 11:03 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Beaver, PA
Posts: 903
Default Mackinac LH and Bridge.

One of my favorite shots from my vacation last month. I thought the red sky and bridge were a little brighter than I'm seeing now though--wondering if my monitor at home is too bright or something. I don't have one of those fancy-schmancy calibrators or anything. I'm thinking about sending it out for a print so any post-production advice is certainly welcome (a little late for pre-production advice, haha). The OOC JPEG colors were a little too cartoony for my liking.

SammyKhalifa is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Aug 31, 2012, 1:01 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 6,521
Default

It looks great on my not-calibrated-at-all office LCD where everything is brighter than it is on my LCD at home, and I like your composition.
Greg Chappell is online now   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 31, 2012, 2:09 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Beaver, PA
Posts: 903
Default

Part of it might be that I work in a cave . . .

Thanks.
SammyKhalifa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 31, 2012, 3:35 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
James Emory's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Bay City, MI
Posts: 2,380
Default

My monitor is sort of calibrated, at least with the software that came with the monitor but I believe it's just basic. Anyhow, looks awful darn good to me. I've been there in the early evening a few times and the pic depicts the mood very well.
__________________
Olympus OMD-M5, HLG6 grip, Olympus 4/3rd 35mm macro lens, Panny/Leica 25mm, f1.4, Olympus 17mm, Canon Pro 9000 Mk II Printer, Canon MP990 Printer, Slik U212 Tripod, Manfrotto monopod, MMF3 converter.
James Emory is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 31, 2012, 4:02 PM   #5
Member
 
MIMudPuppy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: north eastern Michigan in a cedar swamp with DH and Luna and Ziggy
Posts: 67
Default

Looks good on my Dell laptop. Haven't been there in a long time. It's a cool bridge. It's only about 200 miles from me, I ought to give it a visit again.

I really like the shot btw.
MIMudPuppy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 3, 2012, 11:51 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
boBBrennan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Arlington, Texas USA
Posts: 3,565
Default

Sammy, get yourself a peek of the photo on an iPad 3, or 2, it looks great on the iMAC also. I suggests a bit more sharpening for print.
__________________
.
boBBrennan .. FB=> http://tinyurl.com/dxlwxfz

.......he likes Olympus, Apple MAC & SmugMug best of the choices; he likes that he has choices

boBBrennan.smugmug.com
boBBrennan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4, 2012, 12:47 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Tullio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,370
Default

That's a cool shot.
__________________

Tullio
Tullio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 5, 2012, 1:01 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Beaver, PA
Posts: 903
Default

Thanks for all of the support and advice, everyone. Here are some more shots of the same subjects from some different points of view:














I also took what might be an interesting shot of the bridge in the rain that I almost forgot about. This was just one "scene" in a pretty whirlwind trip. I took so many during that trip and still haven't gone through them all almost a month later.

Last edited by SammyKhalifa; Sep 5, 2012 at 1:06 PM.
SammyKhalifa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 6, 2012, 1:56 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
NewsyL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Vancouver, BC Canada
Posts: 231
Default

Lovely shots!

On my calibrated monitors the tower on the right is very dark though some detail can be seen. You may find when printing that the print is dark. This could be because you are editing on a monitor that is too bright in balance against the ambient light level of the room you edit in.

Here's a rough check for brightness - I use it even though I do have a hardware calibrator.

Eyeball Technique

A rough method of setting brightness is to grab a sheaf of white printer paper (several pages thick) and hold it up next to your monitor while it is displaying a white screen (full screen Notepad works well) and while the room has its' typical lighting used while you edit. If the paper looks brighter than your monitor, then your monitor is too dark. If the paper is darker, then the monitor is too bright or perhaps you need to increase the ambient lighting of the room. Imho, it is less than ideal to edit in a near pitch black room.

Most LCD monitors have a native color temperature somewhere near 6500K in order to have whites appear like they would in natural sunlight. Most people still use incandescent or CFL bulbs with a color temperature near 2800K for their room lighting.

Under this traditional lighting the reflected room light off the paper will, in comparison to the monitor screen, appear more yellow (warmer) and this may make you think it is a little darker. You may want to buy some 6000 to 6500K compact fluorescent bulbs, of equal lumen output, for the lighting in your room and use them while attempting this paper method. If these are too blue (cool) for day to day use in your editing room, 5000K bulbs may be a workable compromise.

...............

Here's a site, albeit an "eyeball" method, that may help with a rough calibration of your monitor.

http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/

.
NewsyL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 10, 2012, 10:13 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Beaver, PA
Posts: 903
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewsyL View Post
Lovely shots!

On my calibrated monitors the tower on the right is very dark though some detail can be seen. You may find when printing that the print is dark. This could be because you are editing on a monitor that is too bright in balance against the ambient light level of the room you edit in.

Here's a rough check for brightness - I use it even though I do have a hardware calibrator.

Eyeball Technique

A rough method of setting brightness is to grab a sheaf of white printer paper (several pages thick) and hold it up next to your monitor while it is displaying a white screen (full screen Notepad works well) and while the room has its' typical lighting used while you edit. If the paper looks brighter than your monitor, then your monitor is too dark. If the paper is darker, then the monitor is too bright or perhaps you need to increase the ambient lighting of the room. Imho, it is less than ideal to edit in a near pitch black room.

Most LCD monitors have a native color temperature somewhere near 6500K in order to have whites appear like they would in natural sunlight. Most people still use incandescent or CFL bulbs with a color temperature near 2800K for their room lighting.

Under this traditional lighting the reflected room light off the paper will, in comparison to the monitor screen, appear more yellow (warmer) and this may make you think it is a little darker. You may want to buy some 6000 to 6500K compact fluorescent bulbs, of equal lumen output, for the lighting in your room and use them while attempting this paper method. If these are too blue (cool) for day to day use in your editing room, 5000K bulbs may be a workable compromise.

...............

Here's a site, albeit an "eyeball" method, that may help with a rough calibration of your monitor.

http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/

.
Thank you! I'll definitely have to try that when I get home.
SammyKhalifa is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:46 AM.