Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Olympus Micro Four Thirds

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Nov 19, 2012, 2:37 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
zig-123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Posts: 5,156
Default Titmouse using a Nikkor 300mm f4 lens

The following is an example of what happens when you clearly have too much time on your hands:

Awhile back, I bought a Nikon to m43 adapter. I've never really used it, but, today decided that it was time. I wanted to see just how difficult it would be to shoot birds with this lens attached to my EP-2.

The adapter makes this a manual focus only lens. But, you can get some decent photo results using this combo. The depth of field is very thin due to the set up I use to take bird photos. Greg has seen it so knows how it's done.

Anyways, here is an example:

__________________
http://scortoncreekgallery.smugmug.com/

So you want to be a better photographer? Open your eyes and take a look at what is all around you.
zig-123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Nov 19, 2012, 3:38 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 55
Default

That is lovely! Love the feather definition!
SharonC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 19, 2012, 4:28 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 6,520
Default

Now, that's cool. Excellent job of focusing. Those guys don't sit still for very long so I bet some patience is in order.
Greg Chappell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 19, 2012, 5:12 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
zig-123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Posts: 5,156
Default

Thanks Sharon & Greg,

Yes, Titmouse and Black Capped Chickadees, while very common to the feeder, are extremely difficult to get completely in focus and sharp throughout.
That's as you mentioned, Greg is 'cause their so darned quick.

They fidget and jump, grab a seed and fly off, often before I've had a chance to press the shutter.

I posted this primarily for those interested in knowing what is capable with the E-P2, E-PL2/3 bodies. Provided you have a decent lens, you should be able to get some very good images. Just be prepared for some frustrations starting out.

Also, my suggestion is to set the camera for manual focus and focus the camera where you know the bird is going to be most of the time. A feeder like the one in the image helps because you know where the bird is going to land. Once you have the lens focused, it's a matter of your ability to press the shutter without shaking the camera.

A tripod is a must in this kind of set up. When you first start, if you get 5 out of 100 keepers, you should be happy with those numbers.

Zig
__________________
http://scortoncreekgallery.smugmug.com/

So you want to be a better photographer? Open your eyes and take a look at what is all around you.
zig-123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 19, 2012, 7:10 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
boBBrennan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Arlington, Texas USA
Posts: 3,565
Default

.....pretty much exactlly why I don't try shooting birds Zig. I just sit back and enjoy all the super great and well done images you make; for me it keeps the frustration level manageable.

This is a really super good image, thanks!
__________________
.
boBBrennan .. FB=> http://tinyurl.com/dxlwxfz

.......he likes Olympus, Apple MAC & SmugMug best of the choices; he likes that he has choices

boBBrennan.smugmug.com
boBBrennan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 19, 2012, 7:27 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 6,520
Default

Yep, pre-focussing on a spot with a static camera and doing a fast burst as they come in is probably the best strategy, even with micro-specific lenses.
Greg Chappell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 19, 2012, 11:11 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: oakville, on
Posts: 491
Default

Another point for using the older primes, when used on our m4/3 cameras, our image sensor is working with the central area of the lens, the sharpest point of the lens. Very little if any chromatic, pincushion, barrel distortion.
If the lens was known for its sharpness and clarity, on the m4/3 it can really shine. I love using my old Nikkors, though they do have some weight compared to the native M4/3 lens
KulaCube is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 19, 2012, 11:13 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: oakville, on
Posts: 491
Default

Forgot to mention what a stunner of a shot you have taken there Zig.
KulaCube is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 20, 2012, 12:02 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 6,520
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KulaCube View Post
Another point for using the older primes, when used on our m4/3 cameras, our image sensor is working with the central area of the lens, the sharpest point of the lens. Very little if any chromatic, pincushion, barrel distortion.
If the lens was known for its sharpness and clarity, on the m4/3 it can really shine. I love using my old Nikkors, though they do have some weight compared to the native M4/3 lens
And this 300mm f4 of Zig's is one of the newer ones....an AF-S (I believe) Nikkor, not one of the old manual focus, pre-ED versions that's just a so-so lens.
Greg Chappell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 20, 2012, 6:11 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
zig-123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Posts: 5,156
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KulaCube View Post
Another point for using the older primes, when used on our m4/3 cameras, our image sensor is working with the central area of the lens, the sharpest point of the lens. Very little if any chromatic, pincushion, barrel distortion.
If the lens was known for its sharpness and clarity, on the m4/3 it can really shine. I love using my old Nikkors, though they do have some weight compared to the native M4/3 lens

Well said. One of the real benefits of using a cropped sensor camera.
__________________
http://scortoncreekgallery.smugmug.com/

So you want to be a better photographer? Open your eyes and take a look at what is all around you.
zig-123 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:27 PM.