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Old Feb 21, 2013, 12:29 PM   #1
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Default I have not used this lens very much...

But I may just take the 9-18mm f4-5.6 instead of the 12mm f2 on my upcoming trip. I have a feeling the 9-11mm range is going to come in handy in certain places and be more beneficial than the faster f2 speed. It's definitely going to White Sands in May. The last couple of weeks I've been using it on the E-M5 and it really resolves the detail. Comparing shots at 12mm with the 12mm f2, there's not all that much difference other than the maximum f2 aperture of the prime. The 9-18 zoom at 12mm may actually be a little better in corners compared to the prime just eyeballing comparison files. It's only at the widest 9mm focal length where this lens is not completely as solid as the four-thirds model.

Clicking the C/A correction box in Adobe Camera RAW typically clears all of that issue up, but under certain situations it can require both checking the box and making additional slider adjustments for fringing the basic correction does not completely handle, especially in the far, far corners.

Moon hanging over the tree tops as I hiked the 360 GreenBelt Park last weekend, at 18mm..



"Reaching into the scene", at 9mm. In this image I opened the shadows up quite a bit and completed missed the heavy purple fringing still in the upper left-hand corner, so I'll be using the sliders to clean that up later tonight..



The oldest live oak on the grounds at the Heard Nature Center, at 250 years old, captured at 9mm..



Underneath a raised train track at 14mm. I could kick myself on this one, as about 30-45 seconds after I shot this and walked about 30-40 yards ahead, a train passed by. It would have been a cool shot..



I've captured this exact image below before, with an E30 DSLR and the 9-18 Four Thirds Zuiko. Comparing the two, the Micro model holds up very well. I do think the four-thirds 9-18 is marginally better, especially in the far corners, but this micro lens is just flat tiny and focuses virtually instantly on the E-M5. If one wanted the tiniest, lightest, easy-to-carry two lens combination for the E-M5 capable of covering a very wide set of focal lengths with excellent optical quality, the 9-18 and 40-150 M. Zuikos would be hard to beat.


Last edited by Greg Chappell; Feb 21, 2013 at 1:00 PM.
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Old Feb 21, 2013, 1:08 PM   #2
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Indeed a nice lens. I like taking railroad photos. Here is one I captured back when I had my Canon 40D (I miss you 40D). I played with the black level a little so I could just see the engineer in the window. Before I did that I couldn't even see him.


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Old Feb 21, 2013, 1:25 PM   #3
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I love shooting trains too. I'm currently impatiently waiting for the Dallas Museum of Locomotive History to complete its relocation from being housed outdoors down in Fair Park near downtown to a new, more protected indoor facility up in Frisco, one of the far northern suburbs of Dallas. Much better for preservation of the many historical engines they have.
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Old Feb 21, 2013, 1:45 PM   #4
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Train Shots!

These were from back in the summer, when I was first learning LR. I might clean them up a bit at some point (mostly dialing back the pp).





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Old Feb 21, 2013, 1:52 PM   #5
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Anyhow, that lens interests me, but so do several others as a "next buy." I suppose though if I picked up something like the Oly wide zoom I'd probably let the Panny 14mm go.
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Old Feb 21, 2013, 2:04 PM   #6
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That steamer looks like an old Berkshire style locomotive. Couldn't quite see the drive wheel arrangement so it's a guess. I like the second shot the best but they are all nice shots.
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Old Feb 21, 2013, 2:36 PM   #7
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Quote:
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That steamer looks like an old Berkshire style locomotive. Couldn't quite see the drive wheel arrangement so it's a guess. I like the second shot the best but they are all nice shots.
I'll take your word for it. I thought the technical term for it was "Old Timey Train."

Thanks. The mentions of trains caused me to go back and look at these shots for the first time in months, and the first things I notice are things I'd do differently now than I did then (I lost a lot of shots because I just didn't go high enough with the shutter speed, for example). You live and learn, I guess.



How often do you find yourself needing/wanting something this wide, Greg? I used to think I'd use something like that a lot but now I'm not so sure.
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Old Feb 21, 2013, 2:52 PM   #8
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....Greg, you know my feelings for the FT 9-18 so I suggest you do take the mini 9-18. I can't take the FT 9-18 off any of my Olys, whichever camera I head out the door with has the lens already attached (unless I am hunting butterflies). One day I may do m43 lenses and the m9-18 would be among the first I would consider.
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Old Feb 21, 2013, 3:11 PM   #9
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As kids I remember going to the roundhouse often and we would watch the steamers take on water and coal. I lived those days but even then there was a mix of the new diesel locomotives and steamers. A few years later they were all diesel. Here is an old shot of that yard and most of those buildings are still used but for other purposes. I can hear everyone now, "that guy must be older than dirt".


MCRRWenonaYardBackshop100556[ELNovakPhotoCharlieWhippCollection] by James Gasta, on Flickr

Quote:
Originally Posted by SammyKhalifa View Post
I'll take your word for it. I thought the technical term for it was "Old Timey Train."

Thanks. The mentions of trains caused me to go back and look at these shots for the first time in months, and the first things I notice are things I'd do differently now than I did then (I lost a lot of shots because I just didn't go high enough with the shutter speed, for example). You live and learn, I guess.



How often do you find yourself needing/wanting something this wide, Greg? I used to think I'd use something like that a lot but now I'm not so sure.
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Old Feb 21, 2013, 3:50 PM   #10
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How often do you find yourself needing/wanting something this wide, Greg? I used to think I'd use something like that a lot but now I'm not so sure.
Not tons, but at times I do. That's why I have usually just carried the 12mm f2. The first time we went to Paris I took the Olympus 7-14mm f4 tank-of-a-lens, used it alot at 7mm and captured some shots where I was super glad I had it. Ditto at White Sands back in 2011 when I was using the much lighter and easier to carry 9-18 four-thirds Zuiko.

I can imagine some places in Washington and New York where the much wider view could be a benefit. Depending on where I am allowed to use it, also at McGuire AFB when Kelsey gives me the tour. The penalty will be, having to maybe up the ISO to 800-1600 with the 9-18 instead of being able to stay at ISO 200-400 with the 12mm f2.

The thing that used to make you think twice about packing a superwide....the extra space required in the bag....no longer applies with the tiny 9-18 M. Zuiko. The times I have chosen not to carry it have been more a matter of, not having to think about what lens to use. I'd just grab for the 12mm f2 because that was my wide angle option.

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