Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Olympus Micro Four Thirds

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Apr 22, 2013, 9:23 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: oakville, on
Posts: 491
Wink

Bobs1444
Zig's suggestions are bang on for the money. The 40-150 M.Zuiko will give you the range you currently have with your 4/3s, but with much less weight and size. I can carry mine in a jacket pocket, ever so handy.
The 12-50 just gives you that bit more than your current kit lens. It's wider, longer and focuses closer and as Greg shows, nicely sharp. I'm about to pick one up for myself, though would prefer to go with the 12 f2 or even the 17 F1.8. But for some mysterious reason, neither of these two seem to be available in the same price range as a gently used 12-50 ;-)
KulaCube is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 2013, 4:58 PM   #12
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: mountains of northern New Mexico
Posts: 1
Default kinda have the same question

I haven't used a camera professionally since my trusty OM-4 got stolen many years ago. I seem to recall that the lens I couldn't live without was a very fast Zuiko 35-70mm or so.

I have a new job that requires good sharp photos in extremely variable and sometimes tough situations. I like what I have read about the four thirds technology and I am looking at perhaps the E M-5 I have enough stuff to lug up hills like body bags, GPS, an office full of forms so I don't want the old camera bag full of lens that I carried in the old days. I want light weight but highly functional. I am looking for one lens that will do a sharp closeup of a bullet hole and do a good job of the entire scene. It needs to handle low light conditions and whatever I use needs to be weather sealed because...well...rain and snow happens and I can't wait for the weather to clear up. Any comments, suggestions recommendations would be appreciated..
cougar2shoes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 2013, 11:25 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Biro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 835
Default

Do you shoot portraits of people much? If so, the Zuiko 45mm f1.8 is a lovely prime lens (no zoom) and costs about $350 new. And the new 17mm f/1.8 is a great all-around "normal" prime that's perfect for general shooting and low-light work without flash. If primes don't interest you, I'd probably advise saving up a bit more money and getting the Zuiko 9-18 wide angle zoom. When mounted on the camera, it's about as big as your 14-42 - while still collapsed.
Biro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 3, 2013, 1:14 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 294
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cougar2shoes View Post
I haven't used a camera professionally since my trusty OM-4 got stolen many years ago. I seem to recall that the lens I couldn't live without was a very fast Zuiko 35-70mm or so.

I have a new job that requires good sharp photos in extremely variable and sometimes tough situations. I like what I have read about the four thirds technology and I am looking at perhaps the E M-5 I have enough stuff to lug up hills like body bags, GPS, an office full of forms so I don't want the old camera bag full of lens that I carried in the old days. I want light weight but highly functional. I am looking for one lens that will do a sharp closeup of a bullet hole and do a good job of the entire scene. It needs to handle low light conditions and whatever I use needs to be weather sealed because...well...rain and snow happens and I can't wait for the weather to clear up. Any comments, suggestions recommendations would be appreciated..
You might want to start your own thread or this will get awkward.

It sounds like you're a game warden or park ranger taking reference shots related to poaching?
BBbuilder467 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 3, 2013, 5:49 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: New England, USA
Posts: 2,069
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cougar2shoes View Post
I haven't used a camera professionally since my trusty OM-4 got stolen many years ago. I seem to recall that the lens I couldn't live without was a very fast Zuiko 35-70mm or so.

I have a new job that requires good sharp photos in extremely variable and sometimes tough situations. I like what I have read about the four thirds technology and I am looking at perhaps the E M-5 I have enough stuff to lug up hills like body bags, GPS, an office full of forms so I don't want the old camera bag full of lens that I carried in the old days. I want light weight but highly functional. I am looking for one lens that will do a sharp closeup of a bullet hole and do a good job of the entire scene. It needs to handle low light conditions and whatever I use needs to be weather sealed because...well...rain and snow happens and I can't wait for the weather to clear up. Any comments, suggestions recommendations would be appreciated..

The OM-D EM-5 plus one of the following;

Panasonic Lumix X 12-35mm f2.8 ($1000)
Olympus M. Zuiko 12-50mm f3.5-6.3 ($300 with the OM-D)
Olympus Zuiko 14-54mm f2.8-3.5 + MMF-3 weather sealed adapter ($600 for lens and you might be able to get the MMF-3 for free with the OM-D)

All three options are weather sealed. All three cover the same 35-70mm field of view you loved on your OM-4.

In order of preference I would go with the Lumix 12-35mm f2.8 if you can afford it.

If that's out of the budget then you would need to consider whether you needed the fast aperture of the Olympus Zuiko 14-54mm. Sounds like you will be shooting in the forest and the much faster Zuiko 14-54mm f2.8-3.5 will give you better low light capability, especially if you forget the clip on flash for the OM-D. The downside is you will be carrying a bigger heavier lens than the M. Zuiko 12-50mm f3.5-6.3, plus side is the 14-54mm is sharper and faster.


So overall preference follows price, higher price, better lens;


1. Panasonic Lumix X 12-35mm f2.8 ($1000)
2. Olympus Zuiko 14-54mm f2.8-3.5 + MMF-3 weather sealed adapter ($600 for lens and you might be able to get the MMF-3 for free with the OM-D)
3. Olympus M. Zuiko 12-50mm f3.5-6.3 ($300 with the OM-D)
__________________
in my bag: e-m1, 7-14mm pro, 14-54mm mk ii, 50-200mm mk i, 70-300mm
in my pocket: e-pm2 lumix 12-32
ramcewan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 3, 2013, 9:46 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: New England, USA
Posts: 2,069
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ramcewan View Post
The OM-D EM-5 plus one of the following;

Panasonic Lumix X 12-35mm f2.8 ($1000)
Olympus M. Zuiko 12-50mm f3.5-6.3 ($300 with the OM-D)
Olympus Zuiko 14-54mm f2.8-3.5 + MMF-3 weather sealed adapter ($600 for lens and you might be able to get the MMF-3 for free with the OM-D)

All three options are weather sealed. All three cover the same 35-70mm field of view you loved on your OM-4.

In order of preference I would go with the Lumix 12-35mm f2.8 if you can afford it.

If that's out of the budget then you would need to consider whether you needed the fast aperture of the Olympus Zuiko 14-54mm. Sounds like you will be shooting in the forest and the much faster Zuiko 14-54mm f2.8-3.5 will give you better low light capability, especially if you forget the clip on flash for the OM-D. The downside is you will be carrying a bigger heavier lens than the M. Zuiko 12-50mm f3.5-6.3, plus side is the 14-54mm is sharper and faster.


So overall preference follows price, higher price, better lens;


1. Panasonic Lumix X 12-35mm f2.8 ($1000)
2. Olympus Zuiko 14-54mm f2.8-3.5 + MMF-3 weather sealed adapter ($600 for lens and you might be able to get the MMF-3 for free with the OM-D)
3. Olympus M. Zuiko 12-50mm f3.5-6.3 ($300 with the OM-D)
p.s. I don't own any of these lenses myself. I am just explaining what is available that meets your needs for weatherproofing and field of view equivalent to 35-70mm in film. My statements as to which is sharper are based on what I have seen other people who own these lenses have been able to produce.

If I had the money to blow I'd go out tomorrow and purchase the OM-D EM-5, Panasonic Lumix X 12-35mm and Panasonic Lumix X 35-100mm. Everything I have seen from people who are using this setup is very positive.
__________________
in my bag: e-m1, 7-14mm pro, 14-54mm mk ii, 50-200mm mk i, 70-300mm
in my pocket: e-pm2 lumix 12-32
ramcewan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 3, 2013, 1:06 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
James Emory's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Bay City, MI
Posts: 2,378
Default

Sounds like he shoots portraits of dead people by the way his post reads.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Biro View Post
Do you shoot portraits of people much? If so, the Zuiko 45mm f1.8 is a lovely prime lens (no zoom) and costs about $350 new. And the new 17mm f/1.8 is a great all-around "normal" prime that's perfect for general shooting and low-light work without flash. If primes don't interest you, I'd probably advise saving up a bit more money and getting the Zuiko 9-18 wide angle zoom. When mounted on the camera, it's about as big as your 14-42 - while still collapsed.
__________________
Olympus OMD-M5, HLG6 grip, Olympus 4/3rd 35mm macro lens, Panny/Leica 25mm, f1.4, Olympus 17mm, Canon Pro 9000 Mk II Printer, Canon MP990 Printer, Slik U212 Tripod, Manfrotto monopod, MMF3 converter.
James Emory is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 3, 2013, 4:05 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 6,483
Default

The requirements are certainly intriguing to say the least. Crime scene investigating-like.

Last edited by Greg Chappell; May 3, 2013 at 4:07 PM.
Greg Chappell is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 9:53 PM.