Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Olympus Micro Four Thirds

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 26, 2013, 9:52 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: New England, USA
Posts: 2,069
Default

Great series Greg! What a place to shoot, how on earth did you achieve proper metering? I imagine it must have been like the challenges I had shooting with a snow background.
__________________
in my bag: e-m1, 7-14mm pro, 14-54mm mk ii, 50-200mm mk i, 70-300mm
in my pocket: e-pm2 lumix 12-32
ramcewan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 26, 2013, 11:25 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 6,521
Default

Yes, it is a very fun place to shoot.

The hardest part of shooting there is your eyes, as in you cannot wear sunglasses and see the EVF (or back LCD for that matter). I had sunblock on all over and a hat to protect my head, but after 2-3 hours at a time on that surface without protection your eyes start really bothering you. Make it 2-3 hours twice a day for three days and I actually came home a day early I had had enough.

Exposure-wise, manually set your white balance to daylight. Auto white balance will mess with the coloration at the end of the day when the low sun creates the warm glow on the sand and daylight white balance will capture that. AWB will balance it out and take away what you're looking to achieve. As far as actual exposure goes, the live finder plus the live histogram makes that relatively easy, especially when you manually set your ISO. I was also using manual exposure, so if I wanted the scene brighter, it was just a matter of setting a longer shutter speed, or making the shutter speed faster to make the scene darker, all while watching the histogram. The slow zooms made manipulation via aperture a little difficult since they are slow to start with. Like any landscape, I exposed the scenes to not overexpose and blow highlights, relying on what I saw more looking at the histogram instead of the EVF itself which becomes quite contrasty in light like that (you really cannot judge shadow detail at all), then did what I needed with the shadows in post-processing since the E-M5 files are so good.
Greg Chappell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 27, 2013, 8:04 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
boBBrennan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Arlington, Texas USA
Posts: 3,566
Default

..........very good class on exposure Greg, thank you for that detailed and understandable explanation
__________________
.
boBBrennan .. FB=> http://tinyurl.com/dxlwxfz

.......he likes Olympus, Apple MAC & SmugMug best of the choices; he likes that he has choices

boBBrennan.smugmug.com
boBBrennan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 27, 2013, 6:25 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Steven R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Tampa, Florida
Posts: 5,910
Default

Excellent photos Greg. thanks for the photos and the narratives.
Steven R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 28, 2013, 9:02 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Beaver, PA
Posts: 903
Default

Awesome! Though to me the sand in the first few should be a bit "brighter," must just be either me or my monitor as everyone else seems to thing the exposure is dead on.
SammyKhalifa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 28, 2013, 9:21 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 6,521
Default

Hi Sammy. Thanks.

Early in the morning and late afternoon/early evening when the sun is down low, the sand takes on a whole new texture with a brownish glow and the shadows build up in the channels the wind creates. Most folks out shooting avoid the middle part of the day when the sand is solid white as there is little definition to capture. The sand surfers control the grounds during that time of the day one typically has to hike out a mile or two from the road to find "clean", un-messed up dunes to shoot.

That creates the other problem while shooting in dunes like these....finding you way back to your car. I use a GPS app on my phone and track my way out and back. Otherwise, everything looks the same a couple of miles out there and it can be easy to lose your sense of direction.

Last edited by Greg Chappell; May 28, 2013 at 9:23 AM.
Greg Chappell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 29, 2013, 9:54 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
folob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 856
Default

We have some sand dunes somewhere here in Alberta and I was thinking about going there ... now I am not thining ... I want to go !

Good work !
__________________
Portfolio: http://agilephotography.deviantart.com/

Gears: OM-D E-M5 Mark II and E-M1 MK 1 with 14-150mm Mark II, 12-40mm f2.8, 15mm f8 cap lens, 60mm Macro, 75-300mm, Olympus Trinity -> 25/45/75mm f1.8. On the 4/3 side: 9-18mm and 50-200SWD with the MMF-2 4/3 adapter, FL-36R and FL-50. Also Rokinon mFT 7.5mm f3.5 Fisheye, Pentax 50mm f1.7 with K to m4/3 adapter, Olympus OM 200mm with OM to m4/3 adapter.
folob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 3, 2013, 11:57 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 6,521
Default

A few late additions..











Greg Chappell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 4, 2013, 8:09 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
James Emory's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Bay City, MI
Posts: 2,380
Default

oooooohh, I love the first pic but all are very nice.
__________________
Olympus OMD-M5, HLG6 grip, Olympus 4/3rd 35mm macro lens, Panny/Leica 25mm, f1.4, Olympus 17mm, Canon Pro 9000 Mk II Printer, Canon MP990 Printer, Slik U212 Tripod, Manfrotto monopod, MMF3 converter.
James Emory is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 1:35 PM.