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Old Oct 4, 2013, 9:10 AM   #1
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Default ND filter for my Zuiko 9-18mm

I want to do some long exposure shots with my Zuiko 9-18mm, do you know any kind of filter that I should buy?

I was thinking to buy a filter bigger than 52mm to avoid vignetting, any advice?

Marcelo
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Old Oct 4, 2013, 10:29 AM   #2
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Hi Marcello, I found this link to be helpful.
http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...ns-filters.htm
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Old Oct 6, 2013, 8:22 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarceloLI View Post
I want to do some long exposure shots with my Zuiko 9-18mm, do you know any kind of filter that I should buy?

I was thinking to buy a filter bigger than 52mm to avoid vignetting, any advice?

Marcelo

What makes you think that a 52mm will cause vignetting? I'm not familiar with the 9-18 but I have noticed that Olympus tends to make the filter ring far enough separated from the front element to avoid vignetting from a single filter.

you have two options;

- screw in type filters, these tend to get fairly expensive if you want more than a ND8. Stacking is not worth the bother as I have found from personal experience. IF you go this route get the filters as big as your biggest lens if you can afford it and then get step up rings for your smaller filter diameter lenses

- cokin type. these are square filters and you buy a holder that sits on the lens. Clearly the most flexible and capable but can be rather expensive to assemble a full kit.

I bought a couple Hoya ND filters last year (ND4, ND8) and find them to be okay, as I said stacking didn't work well, and by themselves even the darkest doesn't give a ton of extra room to play with (3 f stops).... in retrospect I would have been better going with a cokin type filter kit with a few bigger ND rating filters.
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Old Oct 6, 2013, 10:15 PM   #4
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Though I have no experience with them, I would caution going for a "variable" ND filter. I was looking into these, one filter, many stops, what's not to like? But the more I read the more apparent a possible problem with an X pattern appearing as the density is increased. Even Schneider with their $500 True-Match Vari ND warn of this.
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Old Oct 7, 2013, 1:30 AM   #5
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You'll probably want something like the Hoya ND400X, 9 stops, to get long exposures of 15, 30, 60 seconds or more.
 
I don't think ND's create that shading/vignette that you get with a CPL on a wide angle lens, if that's your concern. But, you might keep in mind that adding a CPL to an ND is common in landscape/nature, so both the physical and visual vignetting are a possibility.
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Old Oct 7, 2013, 11:58 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Emory View Post
Hi Marcello, I found this link to be helpful.
http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...ns-filters.htm
Thank you Jamjes for the link, very interesting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ramcewan View Post
What makes you think that a 52mm will cause vignetting? I'm not familiar with the 9-18 but I have noticed that Olympus tends to make the filter ring far enough separated from the front element to avoid vignetting from a single filter.

you have two options;

- screw in type filters, these tend to get fairly expensive if you want more than a ND8. Stacking is not worth the bother as I have found from personal experience. IF you go this route get the filters as big as your biggest lens if you can afford it and then get step up rings for your smaller filter diameter lenses

- cokin type. these are square filters and you buy a holder that sits on the lens. Clearly the most flexible and capable but can be rather expensive to assemble a full kit.

I bought a couple Hoya ND filters last year (ND4, ND8) and find them to be okay, as I said stacking didn't work well, and by themselves even the darkest doesn't give a ton of extra room to play with (3 f stops).... in retrospect I would have been better going with a cokin type filter kit with a few bigger ND rating filters.
Thank you Ramcewan for the info, I use to shoot with the Zuiko 11-22mm on my E5 and I noticed the vignetting using ND filters and worst if I you stack two on the lens. I had experience with some Hoya ND and ND9 but I noticed some red color cast those filters produce.

Thank you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KulaCube View Post
Though I have no experience with them, I would caution going for a "variable" ND filter. I was looking into these, one filter, many stops, what's not to like? But the more I read the more apparent a possible problem with an X pattern appearing as the density is increased. Even Schneider with their $500 True-Match Vari ND warn of this.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBbuilder467 View Post
You'll probably want something like the Hoya ND400X, 9 stops, to get long exposures of 15, 30, 60 seconds or more.
 
I don't think ND's create that shading/vignette that you get with a CPL on a wide angle lens, if that's your concern. But, you might keep in mind that adding a CPL to an ND is common in landscape/nature, so both the physical and visual vignetting are a possibility.
Thank you for the info, I had experience with ND filters on my old Olympus E3 and E5 with great results, this is with the Hoya ND9 and the Olympus E3 ( I fixed the vigneting in PP)

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