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Old Nov 27, 2013, 9:05 AM   #11
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Greg,

....I will be getting a Wacom tab/pen; I keep promising myself as I've told you often.
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The over-make of the image is quite well done IMO though I would like a tiny-bit more sharpness.

The whole series (seen on Smugmug) is super sharp, like you said the detail is DETAILED.
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Old Nov 27, 2013, 12:43 PM   #12
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A couple of comments regarding the hood for the 12-40 and the snap ring operation, I'm not necessarily a fan of the "locking" system used on the hood. I say that because about 50% of the time I pull the outfit from my bag the hood has been loosened and is half-way off the lens.

I use a Think Tank City Walker 10 bag and the body/lens combination sits in there face down and the hood can either be fixed in shooting position or reversed for storage, but the outfit obviously moves around as I am walking and bumps into the bag dividers on either side, triggering the locking tabs. It's not a tight fit by any imagination as the dividers are moveable and I have them set to quite a spacious opening for the camera/lens outfit.

The problem is, the tabs are way too easily pressed. The spring tension needs to be substantially tighter for a really secure fit. As it is, the bayonet mount used on other Micro Zuikos is more secure, and as much as I have seen some complain about the thumb screw-type lock used on the hoods for the 75mm f1.8, 12mm f2 and 17mm f1.8, one things' for sure....those hoods are not going anywhere once locked on.

The snap ring is too cool. You can set it on infinity and zoom anywhere from 12mm to 40mm and you capture the subject focussed at infinity. Even better, you can manually focus on a subject, say, 10 feet away, then zoom anywhere and the focus stays locked at 10 feet. With most zooms today, once you zoom you have to refocus but the snap ring locks in the distance no matter where you zoom the lens.

Last edited by Greg Chappell; Nov 27, 2013 at 2:04 PM.
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Old Nov 27, 2013, 4:19 PM   #13
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Thanks for the insight on the lens Greg. I am certainly considering one after seeing your work.

I suppose the competition is the Panasonic LUMIX G X VARIO 12-35mm. Also f2.8. Anyone out there have images to share from the 12-35 lens?

Either way I've got time. I just blew my budget on a new PC.

PS - I use the Tenba Mini Messenger bag. It's narrower than yours so may help keep the hood from coming loose. Of course because it's narrower it likely holds less overall. Having said that, Tenba does have larger sizes. I love mine.

BTW- I've used additional dividers from an old bag laying around. If you have some maybe you can create a more custom fit that won't allow the locking tabs to hit anything as the camera shifts in the bag.

Last edited by chiPersei; Nov 27, 2013 at 4:47 PM. Reason: Added info
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Old Nov 27, 2013, 7:32 PM   #14
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I've actually been test shooting both. I have not taken them out at the same time and shot exactly the same images to compare, but I do have a folder for both.

The Panasonic 12-35..

http://gmchappell.smugmug.com/Other/...4602&k=f8wrTnB

And the Olympus 12-40..

http://gmchappell.smugmug.com/Other/...2685&k=GS6gDG2

Here's what they look like next to each other..



Corner-to-corner and edge-to-edge, the 12-40 Zuiko is more consistently sharp if you pick out any image, but especially the 12mm images from both lenses and look closely. Besides the constant f2.8, the 12mm wide setting is one of the primary reasons for wanting these lenses and the Zuiko is just flat sharp everywhere and at every focal length.

With bodies other than the E-M1, the Zuiko is also much more resistant to fringing. Below is an image I shot this evening, straight into the sun and next to the tree branch as I was looking for the biggest flare-producing scene I could find and there was none. This was captured raw and I did check the "Remove Chromatic Aberration" box as I always do with every raw file I process in Adobe Camera raw, but usually in an extreme case like this with other lenses, especially the Panasonic 12-35, I also have to move the purple bar several increments to remove extra fringing just checking the box does not fix. I even like the look of the specular highlights in the water.

In the end....probably a year or so from now I can see myself shooting with primarily two lenses, this 12-40 Zuiko and the 40-150mm f2.8 M. Zuiko that's supposed to hit shelves at some point during 2014.



Shots at 12mm with the Zuiko. You can click on these to open at my website and view at 100% if you want to look closer..






Last edited by Greg Chappell; Nov 27, 2013 at 7:44 PM.
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Old Nov 27, 2013, 9:18 PM   #15
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Thanks Greg. I really appreciate your effort putting this together. I jumped to smug-mug and compared your images from both lenses. First - they're all really nice work. Kudos.

After looking at full size images from both lenses I concur the Zuiko is the sharper lens. Interestingly this is the case even though the exif data indicates the in-camera sharpness setting was a notch higher with the Panasonic.

A goal of mine is to take some wide-angle shots of a starry night sky (without star trails). Stars being points of light I'm afraid the panny will show fuzzy stars in the corners. That won't do.

Again, thanks for the comparison. I would have leaned toward the panny because it's a tad smaller and lighter. But with the difference in IQ, that's a trade-off I wont make.
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Old Nov 28, 2013, 10:55 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Chappell View Post
... Even better, you can manually focus on a subject, say, 10 feet away, then zoom anywhere and the focus stays locked at 10 feet. With most zooms today, once you zoom you have to refocus but the snap ring locks in the distance no matter where you zoom the lens.
Read this and it got me thinking back to my motion film days when zooming in for focus then zooming out for framing was the standard operating procedure. Never used the practice when I moved to stills as never shot with zooms. Now that I shoot with zooms, think I will explore this. Just read on the Ask Olympus site about a manual focusing trick where it suggested this very practice.
"Since all Zuiko Digital lenses in the E-System are true zoom lenses, the focus does not change when zooming back from the closeup view. Not all “zoom” lenses are true zoom lenses, but rather variable focal length lenses whose focus changes when the zoom is changed. With such lenses zooming in for critical focus and zooming back to shoot is not a reliable practice."
Will be curious to see if the earlier m.zuikos are "true" zooms...

Thanks for the images Greg, was curious to see/hear your reactions to this lens
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Old Nov 28, 2013, 12:25 PM   #17
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Just tried it with the 75-300 M. Zuiko and it worked. Zoomed in on a subject at 300mm and shot, then changed to manual focus so the focused distance would not change, zoomed back to 150mm, took another shot and it was perfectly focused.
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Old Nov 30, 2013, 11:15 AM   #18
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Mmmm, where does the water go entering that large round hole?
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Old Nov 30, 2013, 9:59 PM   #19
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There's a street directly behind where I was standing to take that picture, and a creek that flows beyond. There is a drain at the bottom of the hole that empties the water into the creek to continue flowing.
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