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Old Aug 11, 2014, 1:35 AM   #1
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West Salem farmland as the sun went behind the clouds. E-M1, M Zuiko 12-40 with CPL, 3 image HDR processed in Photomatix, Photoshop, Lightroom and Define 2 for noise reduction.
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Old Aug 11, 2014, 8:33 AM   #2
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I like the detail and color saturation in this, just right for my HDR taste.

One of my challenges still is to make some HDR results other than a few cars photos I've put through Photomatix as single files.
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Old Aug 11, 2014, 10:48 AM   #3
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The E-M1 makes it very easy Bob. Push the HDR button on the on-off switch and spin the front dial to 3F 2.0EV. Squeeze the shutter and boom, boom, boom you've got your three frames. In this light I was able to hand-hold but in anything much dimmer a tripod is handy.
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Old Aug 11, 2014, 10:54 AM   #4
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Very nice. Colors are really pretty. I've started using AWB on my E-M1 all the time vs. what I was doing, which was using the in-camera daylight WB setting for all outdoor shooting. The E-M1's auto white balance controls seems to be spot on in everything from regular to dramatic lighting.

I'm guessing your HDR method is probably much faster over my process of taking one raw file and maximizing the output using gradient filters and the adjustment brush to dodge and burn as needed in Adobe Camera raw like in the image below, and you are utilizing HDR in a much better way than so many, who turn out flat-looking images all the name of capturing every inch of dynamic range. That time of the day, there are shadows and actual dark places in any image (!). It's nice to see someone utilizing HDR sensibly for a change.

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Old Aug 11, 2014, 4:36 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Chappell View Post
Very nice. Colors are really pretty. I've started using AWB on my E-M1 all the time vs. what I was doing, which was using the in-camera daylight WB setting for all outdoor shooting. The E-M1's auto white balance controls seems to be spot on in everything from regular to dramatic lighting.
I tried being mindful of white balance but usually made things worse by forgetting to change it along with changing shooting conditions. I'm sold on the EM1 AWB and will likely only set it to something other than Auto when wanting consistency while switching different filters.

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I'm guessing your HDR method is probably much faster over my process of taking one raw file and maximizing the output using gradient filters and the adjustment brush to dodge and burn as needed in Adobe Camera raw like in the image below...
I love how much dynamic range you pull while keeping the image natural and realistic. It's almost like medium format. Not sure which method is quicker though. I try several different presets in Photomatix trying to find one that will work. Often, as in the case above, there wasn't one that worked for the whole image. I saved two copies of the image from Photomatix, one in which I liked the sky and another in which I liked the field. Then I opened the two images as layers in PhotoShop, used a layer mask and gradient tool to blend the sky I liked with the field I liked.

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... and you are utilizing HDR in a much better way than so many, who turn out flat-looking images all the name of capturing every inch of dynamic range.That time of the day, there are shadows and actual dark places in any image (!). It's nice to see someone utilizing HDR sensibly for a change.
Funny you should say that. I actually starting dodging the trees to the right of the barn but I didn't like the look. Back to flat black.
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Old Aug 11, 2014, 9:20 PM   #6
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I really like that shot, Alan. Well done. You captured a nice range of color and detail and avoided that "plastic" look that so many photographers seem to favor.
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Old Aug 11, 2014, 11:15 PM   #7
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Nice shot, I wish the barn doors had been closed because now I really want to see what's inside.

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Old Aug 11, 2014, 11:54 PM   #8
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Thanks Steven, I appreciate your comment. For anyone interested in making realistic HDR images here's a seven minute how-to video from the B&H pro series. It will be too beginner for many of you but I always learn something from watching these.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TmRFpM_j8RY#t=10
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Old Aug 12, 2014, 12:02 AM   #9
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Nice shot, I wish the barn doors had been closed because now I really want to see what's inside.

Mike
My pleasure. One of the benefits of taking multiple images at different exposures is you can usually find one that contains the detail you want. This is a near 100% crop of the +2 EV image exposed at 1/80, f2.8 and ISO500. Maybe it was better we didn't know.
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Old Aug 12, 2014, 5:51 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiPersei View Post
My pleasure. One of the benefits of taking multiple images at different exposures is you can usually find one that contains the detail you want. This is a near 100% crop of the +2 EV image exposed at 1/80, f2.8 and ISO500. Maybe it was better we didn't know.
Thank you that is excellent!
Though maybe my imagination had something more exotic inside.
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