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Old Sep 17, 2014, 11:47 PM   #1
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Default Belt of Venus

An interesting atmospheric phenomenon that can be photographed is the Belt of Venus. In this photo, if you could follow the fence-line to the rear (left) it would point at the spot where the sun just set below the western horizon. The dark part of the sky, just above the horizon in the east, is the shadow of the earth being cast by the sun into space. The same shadow that creates a lunar eclipse when the moon passes through it. The pale band of color above the shadow is back-scattering of light from the sun. There are better photos of the Belt of Venus out there but I like to grab it if I recognize it while holding a camera. This was taken at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge south of Salem, Oregon.

Single frame, E-M1, m.Z 12-40 at 12mm, 1/60, f4, ISO 800.
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Old Sep 18, 2014, 10:24 AM   #2
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And here I thought I was going to see a neat shot of a crescent Venus through a telescope or something.

That shadow creates a great filtering of the sun during sunsets. I've captured some of my favorite sunsets with the 75-300 using that feature.
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Old Sep 18, 2014, 10:40 AM   #3
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I learn something new from you guys almost every day.
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Old Sep 18, 2014, 3:28 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Greg Chappell View Post
And here I thought I was going to see a neat shot of a crescent Venus through a telescope or something.
I never learned why they call it that. Maybe someone with a better grasp of Greek Mythology can fill us in. Interestingly, this particular shadow is 180º from the sun. Here's a neat 360º pano on Wikipedia that illustrates it's position in relation to the sunset. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belt_of_Venus
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Old Sep 18, 2014, 3:29 PM   #5
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I learn something new from you guys almost every day.
It may not have anything to do with photography but, what the heck?
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Old Sep 18, 2014, 6:48 PM   #6
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.......hmmmmmmmm, so that is what that is.

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Maybe someone with a better grasp of Greek Mythology can fill us in.


I'm old but I wasn't around when that stuff was being tossed about .... consequently I don't know either, besides I was born under the sign of Pisces if that counts.

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Old Sep 18, 2014, 7:46 PM   #7
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Phil Plait of the Bad Astronomy blog has this to say about the name:

...."There’s an irony here, too. Technically, the Belt of Venus is the pinkish band just above the top of the Earth's shadow line, and not the dark band itself. It’s name may come from that glow, referring to the girdle worn by the goddess Venus—I’ve seen that etymology bandied about, but I’m not sure it’s true. Anyway, the irony is that the planet Venus can never be in that part of the sky. Venus orbits the Sun closer than the Earth, so, due to geometry, can never appear more than about 45° away from the Sun. Since the Belt is opposite the Sun, 180° away, Venus can never be in it."

It's a short post with a great photo of the full moon rising in the shadow below the Belt of Venus. Be sure to click through to the SmugMug wider version of the photo.

http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astro..._s_shadow.html
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Old Sep 18, 2014, 8:35 PM   #8
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Well, I also have learned something new. Good shot Alan, and thanks to everyone for all the info.
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Old Sep 19, 2014, 10:19 AM   #9
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Well, I also have learned something new. Good shot Alan, and thanks to everyone for all the info.
Thanks Steven- I went back in last night (after your comment) and lightened it up a little and generally made it a bit more presentable rather than leave it as a documentary photo.
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