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Old Oct 16, 2014, 2:51 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Greg Chappell View Post
haha! MFing hard, indeed.

Does the Rokinon 12mm f2 have a hard stop on infinity? If it doesn't you may be no better off than someone with a 12mm f2 M. Zuiko using the distance scale on the snap ring. I don't find centering the infinity mark over the index with these newer lenses actually gets you on infinity like one used to be able to do in the all-manual focus days.
Yeah I have no idea, but I imagine you could turn it on (in the daytime) and set it, and just take the lens off until the evening.

Does the Olympus "remember" where it is set? I guess it probably does the more I think about it.
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Old Oct 16, 2014, 2:57 PM   #22
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If you have the lens reset turned off, the lens will stay where it was when powered down if it's in AF mode. Using a lens with the snap ring, you can set a distance, then move the snap ring back to AF mode and, at any time re-engage the snap ring and go back to manual focus and the distance set, assuming you don't move the snap ring right or left when you pull it back.
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Old Oct 17, 2014, 12:27 AM   #23
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Man, this is my kind of thread. Sorry I've been out for a few days. Looks like everything has been said so I'll just expand a bit on focus assist mentioned earlier. I found in a dark sky with some bright stars I could manually focus on the stars using the magnify focus assist. Looking through the EVF everything is black when out of focus. Spinning the ring the few brighter stars will start to appear when they come into focus. You still won't see dim stars but when the few bright ones are points of light you're pretty much there. If you're fortunate enough to have a bright object above the horizon (such as Saturn or Jupiter) all the better.
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Old Oct 18, 2014, 11:15 PM   #24
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Man, this is my kind of thread. Sorry I've been out for a few days. Looks like everything has been said so I'll just expand a bit on focus assist mentioned earlier. I found in a dark sky with some bright stars I could manually focus on the stars using the magnify focus assist. Looking through the EVF everything is black when out of focus. Spinning the ring the few brighter stars will start to appear when they come into focus. You still won't see dim stars but when the few bright ones are points of light you're pretty much there. If you're fortunate enough to have a bright object above the horizon (such as Saturn or Jupiter) all the better.
WHAT..!!???

I didn't know this is possible with the OMD-E5..!! Thank you so much Alan for this tip, it will help me to achieve sharp tack focus...!!

Weather is not helping this weekend in NYC so I postponed my visit to Bear Mountain to shoot the Milky Way.

Thank you, thank you, thank you..!!
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Old Oct 19, 2014, 2:27 AM   #25
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WHAT..!!???

I didn't know this is possible with the OMD-E5..!! Thank you so much Alan for this tip, it will help me to achieve sharp tack focus...!!

Weather is not helping this weekend in NYC so I postponed my visit to Bear Mountain to shoot the Milky Way.

Thank you, thank you, thank you..!!
It worked for me using the EM1 with latest firmware and the 12-40 f2.8. I'll be interested to hear if it works using the EM5.
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Old Oct 19, 2014, 11:25 AM   #26
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I don't have the EM-1, but on other web sites I have seen astro photos taken by the EM-1. One guy even hooked the EM-1 to a telescope and captured the International Space Station silhouette as it crossed in front of the sun.
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Old Oct 19, 2014, 11:52 AM   #27
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It worked for me using the EM1 with latest firmware and the 12-40 f2.8. I'll be interested to hear if it works using the EM5.
I tried yesterday and the OMD-E5 has the MF assistant magnification...!! Thank you.
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Old Oct 21, 2014, 11:58 PM   #28
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I went through this a year ago had some fun, but our night sky is now just too bright. And the humidity just accentuates the bright sky. But what I learned was it pays to do some planning. You seem to have your exposure values tuned in, now to work on the depth of field. I found www.dofmaster.com very handy for the planning. If you can, first try to focus on anything you can see. Say it is 10 feet away, at f5.6 with a 25mm focal lenght you have a dof between 7 and 17 feet. At this setting, your stars will not be sharp. But following the calculator, focusing at the "hyperfocal" distance of 24 feet, your dof now extends from 12 feet to infinity.
Like I say, a lot of preplanning. A red lensed flashlight and a tape measure come in handy.
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Old Oct 23, 2014, 10:02 PM   #29
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I went through this a year ago had some fun, but our night sky is now just too bright. And the humidity just accentuates the bright sky. But what I learned was it pays to do some planning. You seem to have your exposure values tuned in, now to work on the depth of field. I found www.dofmaster.com very handy for the planning. If you can, first try to focus on anything you can see. Say it is 10 feet away, at f5.6 with a 25mm focal lenght you have a dof between 7 and 17 feet. At this setting, your stars will not be sharp. But following the calculator, focusing at the "hyperfocal" distance of 24 feet, your dof now extends from 12 feet to infinity.
Like I say, a lot of preplanning. A red lensed flashlight and a tape measure come in handy.
Thank you so much Kula for the tips and the link.

I'm just waiting for a better weather in NYC to try it again.
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