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Old Oct 30, 2014, 9:07 AM   #1
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Default Very Good Article on "Digital Optimum Exposure"

Saw this earlier this week...

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/es...exposure.shtml

I think I'm going to work on calibrating my in-camera overexposure warning (red bars in histogram or red blinkies if one uses that view) as I have noticed as mentioned in this article, images that show overexposure warnings on the cameras back LCD often open in Photoshop's Camera raw showing no overexposure at all, especially after I apply the Adobe-created E-M1 profile.

Of course, this would be a crazy thing to do if you are a jpeg shooter since the out-of-camera file will look very overexposed, to the point of, but not quite clipped. Strictly a raw process.
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Old Oct 30, 2014, 9:45 AM   #2
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I like it (though I'm not sure I'm going to take a bracket of every shot). I try to do this to a much lesser extent, but am always worried about how much of the orange part is going to be recoverable.
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Old Oct 30, 2014, 12:07 PM   #3
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Yeah, bracketing is a little over-the-top in my opinion too.

Shooting manually and using the histogram like I do to judge how far to take the highlights, I've figured out I can let the overexposure (red) warning of the histogram go anywhere from one-half to two-thirds up the end of the right-hand side of the graph, easily, and all the detail is still there when I open the file up in Adobe Camera raw.

In fact, much of the time the histogram in ACR, after I apply the camera profile, shows nothing being clipped at all despite what the cameras histogram was saying, and nothing needs to be recovered at all, so I know there's more "room" to expose to the right. The question is, how much more room is there? That's where I need to do some testing to see how far I can push what I'm doing. From the article, it sounds like at least half a stop to one stop. Looking at the histogram settings on my E-M1, it looks like I already have the overexposure end of the histogram maxed out so there may be no way to adjust the cameras histogram to get it to match what I see in Photoshop. It may just be a matter of me having to make a mental note to myself how much overexposure indication in-camera is still OK.
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Old Oct 30, 2014, 5:31 PM   #4
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I gave the article a quick read on break but I have to read it again when I can give it more thought. It seems the article promotes Exposing to the Right while I was just getting my head wrapped around pushing my histogram left and exposing for the highlights (ETTL). I'll give anything a try to improve output though.
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Old Oct 30, 2014, 8:17 PM   #5
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thanks for the link, I will give it a read. I used to bracket all the time, but found I ended up going with the middle image so often it wasn't worth the extra shutter actuations.
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