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Old Nov 2, 2014, 1:27 PM   #1
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Default ISS captured with the 9-18mm

Last Monday I went close to the water to capture the launching of the Antares rocket from the Virgina NASA facility.

Unfortunately they cancelled the launching to the following day and it resulted in a detonation of the rocket because of a malfunction.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/30/us/ant...ion/index.html

I didn't have the chance to capture it with my camera but at least I had two shoots of the International Space Station.

Notice the light track that has no tilting or blinking lights on it.

You can track the ISS in the following links:

http://iss.astroviewer.net/observation.php

http://www.isstracker.com

1.




2. Going South East and high in the sky.



Have a great weekend everyone.

Last edited by MarceloLI; Nov 3, 2014 at 3:28 PM.
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Old Nov 2, 2014, 2:33 PM   #2
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http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Hu..._Space_Station
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Old Nov 2, 2014, 6:30 PM   #3
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Very nice photos Marcelo. I've always enjoyed watching the ISS go overhead. Another good site to help spot the ISS is Heavens Above. http://www.heavens-above.com/
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Old Nov 3, 2014, 1:31 PM   #4
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Nice shots Marcelo. I have photographed it several times as just a spot in the sky. Don't know why I haven't tried a long term exposure using a tripod. You certainly proved how well that works.

Here is another excellent site to find sighting times at your location.
http://spotthestation.nasa.gov/home.cfm

Last edited by Steven R; Nov 3, 2014 at 1:39 PM.
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Old Nov 3, 2014, 3:56 PM   #5
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Thank you Steven,

I really like the link you posted because you can plan with anticipation when the ISS will be available to shoot in your area.

Marcelo
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Old Nov 3, 2014, 5:43 PM   #6
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How long were those exposures? 3-5 seconds? I guess it might take a 25-30 second exposure to get a line all the way across the sky.
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Old Nov 3, 2014, 9:14 PM   #7
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Greg,

Those are 30 seconds exposure, it takes only 1 or 2 minutes for the ISS to cross the sky depending your location. Sometimes you can see it for 3 minutes.
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Old Nov 3, 2014, 9:44 PM   #8
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Thanks Marcelo. I used to own a big Cat telescope to view stars, planets and nebulaes, but never did much astrophotography. Those two phases of my life/hobbies never collided
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