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Old Jun 27, 2016, 9:56 PM   #1
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Default A plague.

The 17 year locusts are invading my parents' place in Eastern Ohio. If you have never experienced it or if it's been a while, take my word for it that it's a truly disgusting event.

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Old Jun 27, 2016, 10:47 PM   #2
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They emerge from these holes in the ground by the thousands.
untitled-104.jpg by sammykhalifa, on Flickr

The larvae climb the trees, bushes, houses, etc., usually at night.

untitled-115.jpg by sammykhalifa, on Flickr

Leaving their shells behind, everywhere.

untitled-108.jpg by sammykhalifa, on Flickr

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Old Jun 28, 2016, 12:18 AM   #3
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Interesting post. This phenomena must occur locally, because I have not witnessed anything like this here in the panhandle of Florida. We did, however have these critters in Wichita Falls Texas when I was growing up there. I will never forget the shrill song they sang late every evening. The sounds of summer!
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Old Jun 28, 2016, 8:19 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawgwild View Post
Interesting post. This phenomena must occur locally, because I have not witnessed anything like this here in the panhandle of Florida. We did, however have these critters in Wichita Falls Texas when I was growing up there. I will never forget the shrill song they sang late every evening. The sounds of summer!
Yeah, I think they may be a Northeast thing. They happen a lot of places, but on local/regional schedules. Here where I live, for example, they don't come out until like 2019 or something (then 17 years after that), even though not 30 miles from here they everywhere.

You talk about the sound, haha. I didn't remember how LOUD they were at their peak. You could literally not hold on a conversation outside mid-afternoon.

They're almost done now, though. Now they only have to deal with millions upon millions of dead insects falling everywhere. It smells like garbage outside there right now. Blah. They're a stupidest insects I've ever seen (the only thing they know how to do is fly forward in a straight line, no matter what might be in their way). Their only defense mechanism is that there are so many of them that come at one time that all of the birds and other predators get tired of eating them. Well now people have to spray the dead insects from their houses and sidewalks with a garden hose.

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Old Jun 28, 2016, 5:55 PM   #5
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G'day Sammy

Interesting that you call them 'locusts' - In Oz we call them Cicadas
Locusts to us are oversized grasshoppers

These locusts are the farmer's worst nightmare, as they eat their way thru crops until total devastation occurs. I remember a time maybe 8-10 yrs ago when we had a bad time with them. I was in a shopping centre carpark, and the locusts were covering the surface - about 40 locusts per sq-yard/sq-metre. When driving and they splattered onto the windscreen, I needed to stop the vehicle every 1/2-mile / kilometre to wash the windscreen ... the regular screen washers failed abysmally - but all this is getting off-topic

Cicadas come out in summertime, their shrill / buzzing / noise is a welcome part of the summer scene around Oz and we welcome it every summer. The insect makes its way to the tops of the trees and sings itself into a trance, such that some birds will hop along the branch, find a cicada, eat the soft abdomen, and the first we know about it, is the falling to the ground of a dead half-cicada

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Old Jun 28, 2016, 8:34 PM   #6
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'Cicada' is the name I have always heard them called, as well, here in the Northeastern US. I don't recall any infestations locally, and always thought of them as occurring from Pennsylvania, West and South. I recall visiting in Maryland during a hatching year, though, and finding my car completely covered in the mornings.
We have our own periodic infestations of Gypsy Moth caterpillars, which at times, fall from the trees like rain, and have been known to make the roads dangerously slippery.
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Old Jun 28, 2016, 9:28 PM   #7
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You're all correct . . . "locusts" is sort of an older, vernacular, incorrect term I fell into for a moment there. Probably my Pennsylvania Dutch family history sneaking up on me. Ha.

They're not TOO damaging, certainly not as devastating as actual locusts . . .do damage some trees but they have 17 years to recover after all.
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Old Jul 4, 2016, 11:54 AM   #8
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eww I do remember these from some time ago as a kid and they can wreak havoc on a farmers crop and leave those dang shells just about everywhere. Your macro shots are very nice although I must say seeing them up close doesn't make it any better.
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