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Old Jan 13, 2004, 10:21 AM   #11
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I think the price difference is primarily explained by: grey markey products (e.g., intended for Asia, but sold in US); cameras sold w/o warranties, USB cables, chargers, and other standard accessories; etc. But I think it's also possible that some of these unscrupulous heels are trying to unload cameras previously returned for some defect or other.

I think these shady dealers are more prevalent online, but they are easily avoided by looking them up at resellerratings.com. (Many of these guys go so far as to claim that they have been "certified" by any number of online consumer groups. Do your own homework by checking resellerratings). You can buy yourself alot of hassle with that $30 you're trying to save.
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Old Jan 13, 2004, 2:05 PM   #12
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I chose to buy from Amazon because they are an established brand. I can't see them selling faulty products knowingly although there have been allegations about them parallel importing other products, such as CDs, in the UK press recently.

Regardless, the issue seems to be Olympus. The NZ retailers are willing/obliged to take back the faulty products but the manufacturer is claiming that the fault is tolerable and refuses to compensate them. I find it quite amazing that a manufacturer believes that it decides what a consumer should find acceptable rather than the consumer himself. Someone in customer relations in Olympus needs a wake-up slap with a big , wet, cold fish, I think.

Also, I noticed on the Olympus website that a new camera has been released - the C-760. Guess what the big difference between the 760 and 750 is ..... you'r right.... new LCDs.
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Old Apr 17, 2004, 4:23 PM   #13
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Hello,

I'm new to this board, as I'm new to digital photography. I looked around for quite awhile and after reading Steve's and other helpful reviews, decided to purchase the Olympus C-740. I was lucky enough to find it for $249 at a local retail chain, even cheaper than most online stores.

I was using the camera and noticed a few specs on the LCD viewer. I wiped it clean with a cotton cloth and realized that a few of the pixels are dead (2 to be exact). I then took a few test picks, (random subjects, dark, light, with lens cap) and so far havenít noticed an issue with the actual photographs.

Has anyone tried exchanging a camera with a few bad LCD pixels?

Thx in advance, and I hope to get much more valuable info from this forum.

^_^_^
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Old Apr 19, 2004, 4:47 AM   #14
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Olympus New Zealand for one was refusing to take back from Retailers camera's affected with the dead LCD pixels, as far as Olympus was concerned, there wasno problem leaving the retailer stuck with stock that was faulty and having to bear the cost of refunding or replacement with same or other model.

Real good PR and a excellent endorsement to buy Olympus. When I left NZ, some retailers were declining to stock or limiting there stock of the Olympus Digital Camera's as they were not prepared to carry the can on behalf of Olympus. Whether this attitude and refusal to aknowledge faulty products is limited to just New Zealand or else where I don't know.
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Old Apr 19, 2004, 11:51 PM   #15
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As noted I have a C-740 (purchased in the US). I took some more test shots and haven't noticed any issue in normal shots (during the day, good lighting, in the house decent lighting).

I have also reviewed the lens cap shots again. I now notice some specs I hadn't scene before. I'm shooting in HQ 2048x1536 and can pick up specs scattered on the pic. I'm normally looking at it at 55%, but when I go to 100% I can clearly see these specs. I have also taken some shots with the lens covered with a small paper pad, and more specs are prevalent. This may be the paper texture showing up in the shot.

I'm a little disappointed, and will be taking more shots tomorrow. I'm probably going to exchange this for a new one, but not sure if I will get a similar quality or better.

I have only seen this topic in discussions. I haven't scene it come up in any reviews. I may have waited before purchasing, if I would have known of this possible issue.
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Old Apr 20, 2004, 6:51 AM   #16
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This thread has begun to mix all the different pixel issues;

1. There are "dead pixels" that can occur in the sensor or in the LCD or the EVF. They remain constant.

2. There are "hot pixels" which show up as bright dots in long exposure photos. Noise reduction can help to hide these.

Now will pixel mapping help a "dead" sensor pixel or a "hot" pixel or only a very hot pixel?

Will NR help hide dead pixels?
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Old Apr 22, 2004, 5:27 PM   #17
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Well, I went to the store to exchange the camera. They did a naked exchange, and what do you know...The new camera had hot pixels also. It had a blue one right in the middle of the display. :-(

They let me return it at no charge. After finding out about companies not taking returns for hot/dead pixels, I'm not sure what to do???

Thanks for the responses.

^_^_^
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Old Apr 22, 2004, 5:52 PM   #18
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I've heard reports about "dead pixels" on the C750's LCD - but, given the evident confusion amongst posters re: hot pixels on the sensor, dead pixels on the sensor and dead pixels on the LCD, I'm not sure what weight these reports deserve. I've had my C750 for some 6 months and have no dead pixels to report on the LCD.

All consumer digicams will produce noise that sometimes can resemble a "hot" or stuck pixel when shooting at higher ISO or at longer shutter speeds. Don't like it, shell out more $ for a dSLR w/ a larger image sensor and better signal:noise ratio.

When one or more of the sensor's pixels really do(es) go bad, you can run the pixel mapping utility - the camera will identify the bad pixel(s) and substitute via interpolation. Some pixels will inevitable fail - but I have yet to notice any on my C750.

Perhaps those cameras w/ problems as reported are manufactured in a particular country? Mine is from Korea - others are made in Japan and China...
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Old Apr 23, 2004, 12:55 AM   #19
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I'm sorry for the general hot/dead pixel posts. :-/ Also this was for a C-740, not the 750.

My first camera had 2 dead pixels on the LCD. As far as I saw, I never had any issues with the accual pictures themselves. I was able to take great pics, without issue.

The second camera they gave me in store had one hot (blue) pixel, right smack in the middle of the LCD. I didn't get to take any pics, so I'm unsure of any issues with the LCD.

This is one of the reasons I like buying stuff like this at a local retailer, although the price is always more, sometimes a lot more. :-(

It's good to see not everyone has had issues with their Oly's.

^_^_^
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Old May 6, 2004, 12:36 PM   #20
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Usually a digital camera isn't considered "defective" until it has at least 10 problem pixels...that's why Oly won't take them back. To be honest they can replace the "defective" component (CCD or LCD) and the replacement could be worse.

That's why the newer cameras have pixel mapping to fix these problems.

It's just like hard drives...there's no such thing as an error free hard drive...the bad sectors are just mapped out and you never see them. In the old days, you had a sticker on the hard drive showing you every sector that has an error and had to be mapped out (this was done because the installer had to do it). Today hard drives have non-volatile memory that stores the map and even adds to it with use.

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