Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Olympus

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Feb 5, 2004, 1:32 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 9
Default C750 or FZ10?

Hi

I've only ever used a 35mm film camera for taking point-and-shoot photos. I'd like to experiment with digital photography and I'm seriously considering purchasing either a C750 or a Panasonic FZ10. My primary intention is to use the camera for wildlife and landscape photography. I expect most of my pictures to be taken during the day in sunlight or overcast skies (thanks to the great British weather).

I think the C750 would probably be sufficient for my needs and I know it is less expensive than the FZ10, but the one thing that draws me to the FZ10 is the image stabilisation. I'd prefer not to have to lug around a monopod or a tripod when doing my photography and image stabilisation appears to suggest I probably wouldn't need to do this. However, I was wondering how much of an issue camera shake really is. Do you manage to take long zoom pictures without the aid of a monopod/tripod? Or is this essential equipment when using the C750 for long zoom wildlife photography?

I know the C750 supports panoramic photography and I like the sound of this, but is there anything else you think I would need to consider when comparing the C750 and the FZ10?

Many thanks for any help you can give.
mileswaterson is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Feb 5, 2004, 9:30 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 53
Default

Image stabilization is very important for zoom shots. You may get usable pics from the 750 at full zoom if you use burst mode or brace yourself against a tree, or use a tripod/monopod.

You will get a higher percentage of sharp pictures with image stablization. IMO

The FZ10 or any camera can do panorama shots. You just need to overlap pictures, use a tripod to keep level and lock exposure so it doesn't vary shot to shot. The Olympus panorama feature just shows brackets that assist in overlapping images.(Not sure if it locks exposure) There is better software to do panorama than what ships with the olympus.

Further considerations.
Batteries FZ10 - proprietary but work well. Non OEM batteries can be found for $22-$25 US. 200+ shots, 90 minute recharge
FZ10 - To add lenses you either buy 72 mm that screw into the lens hood or buy an adapter to use smaller 62 or 55 lenses
FZ10 - seems to be a well built solid feeling camera. I can't comment on the 750
FZ10 - Panasonic 256mb and > SD cards are have a fast 10mb transfer rate. Very good burst mode.
FZ10 - amazing macro ability 5cm
FZ10 - Manual focusing ring

I still have my Oly C5050, but I'm sure not using it much since I got the FZ10.

No one camera is perfect. You just have to decide which shortcomings would bug you the most, which features you can't live without and finally do you like the image quality.
Ramblin_mo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 6, 2004, 2:42 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Indian Rocks Beach, FL
Posts: 4,036
Default

The panorama mode is nice on the Oly. It locks everything on the first shot and keeps track of the panoramas in order for easy stitching in the Camedia software Ė the only thing I find the Oly software even slightly useful for. You can take panoramas with the FZ10 but it is a lot more hassle.

The 750 is also considerably more compact.

The FZ10 not only gives you 2 f stops throughout the range with the stabilization but it is almost an f stop faster at full zoom, as it maintains f2.8 throughout the range. You can get a lot more shots without a tripod. You canít shoot in all outdoor lighting situations without a tripod though at 12X. With a heavy overcast or deep shade in the woods you have to crank the ISO up or find a way to steady the camera. And even ISO 400 can be problematic with really poor light. At lower zoom settings you can handhold in just about any outdoor light though with a decent ISO.

I just ordered an Ultrapod II. I have a small original Ultrapod for my pocket camera but it isnít sufficient for the FZ10. It is a tabletop tripod but has angled legs and a Velcro strap that allows you to attach it to anything when folded. Any stick you can find becomes a monopod. And I find all sorts of things like benches and poles I can attach it to for night shots. The Ultrapod II is 4 oz and fits in your pocket Ė about $20 online.

The stabilization isnít only for long telephoto shots. At lower zoom settings you can handhold to amazingly low shutter speeds. That gives a lot of versatility. In a well-lit room you can handhold without a flash for instance. Some people are better than others at steadying the camera and I think I am at the lower end of the spectrum looking at some 1/4 second shots others have taken. My best has been 1/6 second for a sharp image and I canít even do that consistently.
slipe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 6, 2004, 2:56 PM   #4
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 11
Default

The FZ10 and C-750 are almost identical when it comes to picture quality.. and features...

The Image stabilisation is a handy feature, but it is rather big!.. and I think thats the fundamental difference here, the C-750 is very small for its zoom size, and easily fits in a coat pocket.. the FZ10 is rather large...

If 'size' is not an issue, then it makes sense to get the FZ10, especially if you are always at the 12X zoom setting in low light, although IS is no guarantee of pin sharp photo's..

If you have good technique, and some practise, you can get excellent results with the C-750.. I had a chance to try the C2100 and FZ2 (Brother in law's camera's, He's waiting for the FZ10 himself), And interestingly, on a dull day, @ full zoom, about 6-7 out of 50 shots on the C-750 suffered from camera shake, the FZ2 and the C2100 still suffered 3-4... an improvement, but not a massive one..
To be fair, I am use to shooting with a non IS large zoom, and always use shutter priority in low light, ensuring its sufficient to hand hold..

From the tests we did, I would have said on the C-750 1/200th is the limit for perfect focus, and 1/100 on the FZ2 (similar to FZ10), if you don't mind a slightly softer image then I found the FZ2 would be 'ok' down to about 1/60th.. not bad at all (The C-750 in the same conditions could only manage 1/160th)..

However, if you use a tripod, the pictures take an air of perfect focus, and the Oly, with its IR remote is excellent for ensuring zero camera shake..

Enough waffle, all I am saying is that IS does work, but its no guarantee, and for dedicated shooting, a tripod is always preferable, I use teh Velbon VTP815 travel tripod, miniature in size when folded, but extends to full size..

If you don't mind the size, the Panny with the IS is going to be slightly better, but if you want a take anywhere camera with the same PQ (but without IS) the C-750 is a worthy choice...
phil-t is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 7, 2004, 11:29 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Indian Rocks Beach, FL
Posts: 4,036
Default

Shooting in shutter priority gives no advantage in most prosumer cameras. Once you get to the reciprocal of the focal length in shutter speed the lens is wide open and the camera is giving you the best shutter speed it can for the available light. You can force the picture without enough light in either shutter priority or manual planning to bring things back in post processing. That isnít a bad plan if the alternative is to miss the shot, but photo editing software isnít magic and the shadow detail is going to suffer in the resurrected image.

I canít speak for the FZ1/2 because Iíve never used one, but the stabilization on the FZ10 gives a conservative 2 f stops Ė maybe a little better but certainly no worse. If you can successfully handhold at 1/200 without stabilization you can go down to at least 1/50 with mode 2 stabilization and get the same or better percentage of sharp shots viewed at 100%. And the difference in f2.8 and 3.7 at full telephoto means you are able to get almost twice the light to the CCD, which you can use for better ISO or faster shutter speed. The FZ10 will take sharp handheld pictures in about 1/8 the light that the 750 would require Ė there isnít any voodoo, 3 f stops is 8 times the light. And the stabilization plus faster lens is 3 f stops. I donít agree that 3 f stops is ďslightĒ.

I agree that IS is no guarantee you will be able to shoot long telephoto shots handheld in all lighting conditions. It isnít true and you should own a good tripod for either camera if you are into nature photography. A good point that can be made for the Oly is that if you are going to have to carry a tripod anyway when you go off on a nature shoot, why not carry the lighter and less expensive camera? The Oly is at least as good as the FZ10 on a tripod and a lot more convenient to carry. But there are shots you are going to miss if you have to set up a tripod, and the FZ10 would get a decent percentage of those.
slipe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 25, 2004, 10:33 AM   #6
Member
 
zoegy73's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 56
Default

Which one you choose :

Panasonic FZ10 with nothingexcept those in the box and cost at KRW 540000

and

Olympus C750 with 256 Meg of xD, Tripod, 52 mm lens adapter, and UV lensat KRW 520000.

Sorryfor using KRW instead of USD because I am in South Korea right now. So far I do not decide to buy either of them yet.

Thanx

Sugiharto
zoegy73 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 25, 2004, 3:46 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 51
Default

I have a 750 (Actually a Fry's 755) and have played with the FZ15 at Frys.
Manual focus is MUCH easier on the FZ.

With the 750, focus adjustments are buttons on the back, and the "magnified" focus assist is VERY pixelated. It looks like they merely blew up the normal EVF pixels so one pixel gets enlarged to a 3x3 block, without increasing the actual resolution displayed.

On the FZ, focus adjustment is a ring around the lens. It is still motorized, but much more familiar for old film SLR users. Also, the magnified focus assist area is MUCH better. The enlarged area makes full use of the EVF LCD, and shows more detail than when non magnified.

If you are planning on doing much low light shooting where the AF is not working, the FZ will be much easier to manually focus.
segbert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 1, 2004, 4:43 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 141
Default

I fully agree that manually focussing with a ring is much more pleasant. But the C-750 does have one important thing that the jerks at Panasonic omitted: a distance scale in Manual Focus. That can be very helpful in dark conditions.
EOS RT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 28, 2004, 5:21 AM   #9
Member
 
zoegy73's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 56
Default

EOS RT wrote:
Quote:
I fully agree that manually focussing with a ring is much more pleasant. But the C-750 does have one important thing that the jerks at Panasonic omitted: a distance scale in Manual Focus. That can be very helpful in dark conditions.Though
Though FZ10/15/20 said as have circular ring for focusing, It is actually electronic. The processor calculate angular speed and convert it into linear speed of objective lens. Oftenly, if you turn the ring too fast, camera can be "headache".

I agree with EOS, distance scale can be useful for lowlight condition and even in good light it is useful forplaying Depth of Field.:|
zoegy73 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 2, 2004, 7:45 PM   #10
Member
 
dalick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 69
Default

zoegy73 wrote:
Quote:
EOS RT wrote:
Quote:
I fully agree that manually focussing with a ring is much more pleasant. But the C-750 does have one important thing that the jerks at Panasonic omitted: a distance scale in Manual Focus. That can be very helpful in dark conditions.Though
Though FZ10/15/20 said as have circular ring for focusing, It is actually electronic. The processor calculate angular speed and convert it into linear speed of objective lens. Oftenly, if you turn the ring too fast, camera can be "headache".

I agree with EOS, distance scale can be useful for lowlight condition and even in good light it is useful forplaying Depth of Field.:|

The distnace scalesettingis an option that I have just found out about on my 765. It works a treat as before If I was going to shoot in low light areas Iused to find a place were light was good,focus lockso I had the shutter release half way downthen pressed it down to take a photo in the low light area.
dalick is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:33 AM.