Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Olympus

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Feb 14, 2004, 8:11 AM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 41
Default

i have a c700 and hate it indoors . can not get a good pic to save my life . i called olympus and they say to change the settings , i have tried everything . next thing i try will be buying a nikon!!!!
hdshp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 15, 2004, 7:07 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 170
Default

See;

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Olympu...rry_Photos.txt
Pooperdog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 15, 2004, 7:17 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 824
Default

Poopdog,
You're going to have to post that message here if you want people to see it. Yahoo doesn't let you in without membership.
Norm in Fujino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 15, 2004, 8:52 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 170
Default

Coping with the poor auto-focus (especially in low light)
=============================================
Avoid using much zoom in poor light.
Use iESP focus rather than spot focus. It seems to be more successful.
Watch that green dot. If it keeps blinking Auto-Focus failed and the
shot will probably be out of focus.
Use the highest ISO you can tolerate from a noise standpoint.
Auto-focus on a vertical edge or a dotted pattern. Placing a white
straw in someone's shirt pocket can help.
Turn the camera so that the brightest sharpest edges on your subject
appear vertical to the camera.
After a successful auto-focus is achieved with a half-press of the
shutter button; lock the focus by pressing OK (which enters manual
focus mode). This will even work in Macro mode.
Use Macro mode if the subject is closer than 25 feet.
Use the double-push Quick View to review the last
photo. You can zoom in on it 4x and examine the focus.
A pattern-head laser pointer can enable you to focus in low or
no light if you are zoomed in on the pattern. Do not use this
approach with people and do not shine the laser into anyone's eyes.


Coping with Camera Shake or motion blur
=============================================
Remember that any motion at all will require 1/10 sec or better or the flash to avoid motion blur
The optimum shutter speed to avoid motion blur depends on the speed of the moving subject.
For basic shots the recommended minimums are 1/30 sec for wide angle and 1/300 sec for telephoto.
Beware the slow EVF. The display becomes very slow in low light.
Press the camera against your face for better stability.
Use a tripod or a monopod like a pro does.
Pooperdog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 16, 2004, 12:34 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 824
Default

I haven't tried the first technique, but in general sounds like good advice.
Norm in Fujino is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:13 PM.