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Old Aug 1, 2004, 9:13 PM   #1
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Hello, I have been a member for a while, but this is my first post.

My C750 will focus on a subject and a beautiful image will appear on my viewfinder/screen, but when I go to take the photo the image shifts and becomes much lighter.. Grrr.. I go from a *great* photo to trash!

I thought this problem was being caused by taking pictures while standing in the sunlight b/c it seemed to be much less noticable if I was in the shade, however, in trying to take photos at night of light subjects (moon, fireworks) I get the same shift.

Does anyone have a suggestion or solution to this problem they are willing to share with me? Thanks for your time.
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Old Aug 2, 2004, 12:43 AM   #2
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can't quite understand what youre trying to say about "shift."Are you getting blurred pictures? If so, try using a tripod oruse faster shutter speeds.

As with the image becoming lighter, I think its normal. The camera is giving you a preview of the image on the lcd at a certain f.p.s. This I think can'tshow you the exactbrightness of the final shot of the image when its taken.
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Old Aug 2, 2004, 1:22 AM   #3
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staracer wrote:
[quote]can't quite understand what youre trying to say about "shift." Are you getting blurred pictures? If so, try using a tripod or use faster shutter speeds.

Thank you for your reply, staracer.

The image in the viewfinder looks perfect, correct light and in focus when the button is partially depressed. When I completely depress the button to take the photo, the image will become very bright and washed out... and the photo is the same. The image becomes so much lighter(or would you say brighter?) that it is basically unusable.

I do not have a lot of experience with editing photos in software, but these files are so washed out that I think they are hopeless.

This particular problem is not blur from camera movement.. at least, I don't think it is.
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Old Aug 2, 2004, 1:52 AM   #4
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There's a few issues here. The "colour shift" has to do with the camera changing exposure for the scene...the fact that the viewfinder changes means it is showing you what it will take.

You have to learn some realities about photography how auto-exposure works and why it might be too bright or too dark:

http://www.outdooreyes.com/photo40.php3

The meter is trying to find 18% grey, and if your subject is too dark or too light it will be fooled.

And as for focusing, there's a few things that are needed to obtain a focus lock:

http://www.howstuffworks.com/autofocus3.htm

The only real way to get around this issue is to learn how to use manual exposure, and manual focusing. There are other ways, like using the AutoExposureLock button, you point at something that's roughly 18%grey and lock the exposure with the AEL button, and you can lock focus by half pressing the shutter and tapping OK.

Note that these issues aren't limited to the C-750 or Olympus cameras...it's the reality with most digital cameras.
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Old Aug 2, 2004, 2:02 AM   #5
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Mikefellh wrote:
[quote]There's a few issues here. The "colour shift" has to do with the camera changing exposure for the scene...the fact that the viewfinder changes means it is showing you what it will take.

Thank you, Mikefellh, for the info and the links. I will try the suggestions and see if that is the answer. It certainly makes sense, and seems to explain why it happens only on occasion.

I agree that I need to learn how to use the manual mode, that could make a difference, too.
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Old Aug 2, 2004, 4:20 PM   #6
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A tip for using this message forum, only the text you're quoting should be between the QUOTE /QUOTE tags...your reply should be after the /QUOTE.
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Old Aug 3, 2004, 5:47 AM   #7
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What settings are you using on your c750?

If you are using Full-Time Autofocus then the camera could possibly have shifted it's focus. I'm not too sure about this - I never use Full-Time AF but it is a possibility.

What Mode do you normally use your camera in? Auto, Sport, Program? Try changing the mode you normally use to something else. I find Program the best as you can tweak the Exposure Values +/- if you want to.

What is your EV set to? In my experience with the c750 you almost never need to go into the positive values, if you do shots tend to be horribly washed out and hugely over-exposed. Try making sure that your settings are for 0.0 on the EV or -0.3 which is the setting I use most often.

The only other things I can think of to say is to make use of the "Live Histogram" feature on the camera as it will provide a proper measure of your scene. If you get large peaks on either end of the histogram it means the shot is badly under- or over-exposed (a peak to the right of the histogram means over-exposed and under-exposed if the peak is on the left side).A simplistic way of looking at it is to try and get the "peaks" in the centre of the histogram. You can make adjustments by using the +/- EV feature and you can see directly how these changes affect your shot with the histogram enabled.
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Old Aug 8, 2004, 1:38 PM   #8
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Thank you for your suggestions, redundo. I was taking pictures after a college graduation this weekend in full sun, and watching all the settings to see could be causing the problem.

The exposure compensation is set at +2. Nothing I could find to change in the camera would change this number, which I suspect from your post could be the cause of the problem.

I set the live histogram to show what was going on and sure enough, all the peaks were at one end of the spectrum.

I was using the action mode, and began changing modes to see if another one would give me center peaks.. *finally* I came to "auto", and there the camera gave me the pictures I knew it was capable of.. great color and sharp clear photos... and the exposure compensation was set at +0.

Thanks to all for the great suggestions and help in working out this problem.

What can I do to change the exposure compensation from +2?
Any ideas? There doesn't seem to be a direct adjustment for this number.. at least, I haven't been able to find it.
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Old Aug 8, 2004, 4:36 PM   #9
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redundo wrote:
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What is your EV set to? In my experience with the c750 you almost never need to go into the positive values, if you do shots tend to be horribly washed out and hugely over-exposed. Try making sure that your settings are for 0.0 on the EV or -0.3 which is the setting I use most often.
It all depends on the scene, if it's overly light or overly dark...you should start at 0 and then decide how to compensate for the scene. There's no set rule about not going positive or you should be at -0.3...and that goes for ANY camera setting...yes there are guidelines, but you can break them.
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Old Aug 10, 2004, 6:19 AM   #10
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If you leave your camera set in Program mode you will be able to adjust the EV yourself by using the < and > buttons on the 4-way keypad. If you keep an eye on the Live Histogram before and after you make an exposure correction you will be able to see it move quite noticeably. I only say that you rarely need go into the positive EV numbers out of personal experience, I have used +0.3 once or twice but I take the majority of my shots in either 0.0, -0.3 or -0.7.

Like I said before, keep an eye on the Live Histogram when the majority of the peaks are close to the centre it is a good indication of a well-exposed shot.


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