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Old Oct 5, 2004, 5:31 PM   #1
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Sorry if this sounds daft, what setting produces 300ppi shots on the olympus 5060? I tried what I thought was the highest setting and I keep getting 72ppi - is there something I am doing wrong? Regards, and thanks! Avi:?
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Old Oct 5, 2004, 7:20 PM   #2
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I think you must be referring to the default resolution you get when you first opena file with Photoshop. What you should be looking at (at the camera end) is the number of pixels of widthx height (2592 x 1944 for the 5060) and the lowest compression (highest quality). You can change the resolution to 300 inPhotoshopwhen you are ready to print. Adjust the image size so that the overall number of pixels stays the same. Remember that when you save a jpeg fileyou are in fact adding compression and therefore losing data so try to limit the number of edits. Always make a copy of important original files and edit the copy not the original.
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Old Oct 6, 2004, 12:03 AM   #3
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SydneyIsHome wrote:
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I tried what I thought was the highest setting and I keep getting 72ppi - is there something I am doing wrong?
There's nothing you're doing wrong...72dpi is hard coded and can't be changed. Every resolution on the cameras is 72dpi...unfortunately it's a leftover from the Mac days.

The DPI only becomes an issue when you want to print, and at that point you'd be adjusting the image size anyway depending on whether you want a 4x5, 4x6, 8x10, or whatever...and at that point the DPI would change anyway depending on what print size you choose.

If you're just looking at pictures on the monitor, a 1600x1200 picture would look the same on the screen whether it's 10dpi, 100dpi, or 1000dpi.
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Old Oct 6, 2004, 8:25 PM   #4
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Thanks so much Riva, does that mean every time I save an image when working on it in photoshop it loses compression? Greetings to all, Avi
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Old Oct 6, 2004, 8:27 PM   #5
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Thanks Mike, you are all so nice and helpful! In my work I have to save two sets of images, one for web use and one for printing brochures - web use I know is fine at 72ppi but now at least I will stop agonising over why my camera wont take shots at 300ppi. Signed, obviously still a learner!
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Old Oct 7, 2004, 10:11 AM   #6
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Avi, JPEG is a compression scheme that operates by discarting some image information to reduce file size (TIF preserves all the detail in the original, discarting only redundant data). You can apply various degrees of compression to a JPEG file by selecting the image quality in your camera menu (i.e. - SHQ, HQ, SQ1, etc.) and also while saving to JPEG with your editing software (Photoshop, I am assuming) (MAXIMUM, HIGH, MEDIUM, LOW). Assuming you are editing an uncompressed (TIF or RAW) file, when you save as a JPEG in your editor you will be losing a certain amount of information. You probably will not notice on the first save (at MAXIMUM setting). However as you save many many times, the image will noticibly deteriorate, especially if you are selecting HIGH, MEDIUM or LOW settings (higher compression). That is why it is wise to archive the original file and work with a copy. Try to limit the number of saves and always save in MAXIMUM mode (least compression).
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Old Oct 7, 2004, 2:05 PM   #7
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SydneyIsHome wrote:
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Thanks so much Riva, does that mean every time I save an image when working on it in photoshop it loses compression?
I'll take the photo in JPG format, but when editing a work in progress, I'll save it in the proram's native format (Photoshop's PSD, Corel's CPT)...that way there's no loss with every save, but as well any masks, layers, etc. are not lost. That way if I made a layer in the middle that I didn't like I could still remove the layer without disturbing the rest of the picture.

It's only when I'm done and satisified that I'll flatten the image and save it again as a JPG.
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