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Old Nov 3, 2004, 9:39 PM   #1
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Does the C-750 have a night time flash mode?
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Old Nov 3, 2004, 10:20 PM   #2
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It depends on what you mean by night time flash mode.

There is a night setting on the Mode dial. This extends the non-flash part of the exposure so that background city lights and the like show up better.

The actual flash settings, via a quick select button, are:
  • No Flash (flash closed)
    Auto
    Red Eye
    Fill in (always flash)
    Slow
Slow can be set in the menus to be:
  • Slow1
    Red Eye Slow
    Slow2
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Old Nov 4, 2004, 3:07 PM   #3
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By using the night mode, do I need to use the built in flash or any flash.
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Old Nov 5, 2004, 1:33 AM   #4
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I have just tested this with my C-755, which is a black C-750

With the mode dial in the Night setting, it will fire the built in flash or a DEDICATED flash, such as an Olympus FL20 or FL40 or a Promaster 5750 with the proper dedicated module.

It WILL NOT work with a generic, single contact hot shoe flash, or any other non dedicated standard flash. These flashes only work in the A or M mode. This is because when using any non-dedicated flash, you will need to set the camera to a specific F-stop, and the A or M modes are the only ones that let you do this. Unless the camera can communicate exposure information with the flash (internal or dedicated external) it will simply not fire it in any other mode.

IMPORTANT: If you use a flash that is not dedicated for your specific model on any digital camera, you must make sure it has a safe trigger voltage. Some battery powered flashes may have several hundred volts on the flash sync contacts. This is especially true of older ones you may have lying around, or studio flashes, but it may be a problem with any flash. This will fry the flash triggering circuitry in the camera, which may be rated as low as 6 volts maximum. This has been discussed extensively in these forums. Search for "sync voltage"
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Old Nov 5, 2004, 1:59 AM   #5
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Normally, when you taka a picture outdoors at night, the flash properly illuminates the foreground subject, but the background objects, say the city lights, don't get any flash, and appear as a big black nothingness.

The Night mode fires the flash normally to properly illuminate the foreground subjects, but it keeps the shutter open much longer than is needed for the flash, to allow the background's own light to make enough exposure to be seen.

You get Grandma standing in front of a lit up night city skyline instead of Grandma in a big black void.

I suggest you download the C-750 basic and reference manuals from the Olympus web site. They contain pictures explaining this much better, as well as a wealth of other information on the capabilities of this camera.
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Old Nov 6, 2004, 10:11 AM   #6
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I mostly use the night scene mode with the flash forced OFF. This has given me some great results witha more natural look. Keep in mind that a keeping the camera perfectly still is key for any night shots, and use the remote or self-timer to trigger the shutter.
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Old Nov 8, 2004, 4:31 AM   #7
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Why use night mode when you can use Manual Exposure instead? I don't get it.

In Night Mode, you are at the mercy of the camera's 'decisions'. In Manual, you decide yourself.

Learn how to use theManual mode, guys - it's pretty simple - and you'll be happier with your photos.
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Old Nov 8, 2004, 1:04 PM   #8
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EOS RT wrote:
Quote:
Why use night mode when you can use Manual Exposure instead? I don't get it.

Learn how to use theĀ*Manual mode, guys - it's pretty simple - and you'll be happier with your photos.
Well, not everyone knows, or wants to bother with manual settings. The camera has point and shoot scene settings, and people who don't know the technicalities of photography want to use them. They don't want to be bothered with knowing.

I'm sure there has been at least one time you have used Program or one of the "priority" modes on your camera rather than full manual. I admit I have, even though on the previous camera I had didn't have any of those modes, it was fully manual and I had to set the shutter and aperture for every shot, and I loved it. But I won't deny the automatic scene modes to those who don't want to get into all that.

BTW, have you ever used a C-7xx or other Olympus C-Series camera?
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Old Nov 9, 2004, 3:12 AM   #9
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In the few weeks I've been coming to these Forums, I've noticed that you seem to have a particular attitude in several of your posts, Mike. Kind of like you enjoy opportunities to spew your 'superior knowledge' in a rather condescending manner.

I've no doubt you know more than I do about digital cameras, and I'm grateful for anything you can help me learn. You seem to know your stuff. But I can do without the attitude. I can't stop it, of course - that's your decision. All I can say is that if it continues, I'll keep mentioning my disapproval of it when I'm involved.

Now, as for my previous post, I was merely trying to encourage the posters to expand beyond the automatic settings, and get into more creative photography, which is often concurrent with more fulfilling photography. They write in their posts that they are impressed with the effects which can be achieved in 'Night Mode'. I figured that they'd be even more impressed if they venture beyond this automatic mode, and looked into using the Manual Exposure option. I am well aware that some people are content to use Automatic modes - your mini-lecture on the subject did nothing to enlighten me. I did not attack the other posters.I was not "denying the automatic scene modes" to them. Quite simply, in my view, based on their posts, these posters might enjoy the additional options, as well as the personal touches,which Manual mode offers, and I merely wished to encourage them to explore this option.Your post, then, had no practical value, other than to 'butt in' to 'save' the other posters from what you conveniently - and erroneously - felt was my inappropriate conduct.

Please consider this a mere pre-emptive move on my part, Mike. I'd simply like to enjoy posting without the resident self-proclaimed expertinspecting and dissecting my posts, and adding condescending, 'peanutgallery' type comments.

Thanks.

I have used the Olympus C-740 - taken perhaps 150 photos with it.


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Old Nov 9, 2004, 8:18 AM   #10
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I agree with EOS RT on this one. The forums are for people seeking advice, not for show-offs.

I've not have that much photography experience, and only gotten really active last year when I was given a Oly mju400 for Christmas. And the little fellow has no manual controls whatsoever.:?

The only thing I learnt from the mju-400 is how to learn to compose based on different situations, sort of like cheating the camera into giving you the picture you want.

I've since upgraded to a C770UZ, too many controls available on this one. Still feeling my way around and reading a lot online on photography techniques, composing, focus, aperture, shutter speed, depth of field, etc.

The only advice that I'll give is to put the camera through as many different settings as possible and view the different effects. You never know what you might find till you tried. The "film" is already paid for and reusable over and over again, so just shoot away.

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