Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Olympus

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jan 7, 2005, 12:33 PM   #11
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 7
Default

I have had my c8080 for 3 weeks now... some focusing issues but nothing more than other cameras. Avoid taking pictures of people with strong patterns in the background. It will almost always focus on the background- this is true for most cameras.
mconheady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 19, 2005, 11:22 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
John G.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 248
Default

hittnrunn wrote:
Quote:
I recently purchase an Olympus 8080WZ. So far, most of my photos are just unacceptable for a camera in this price range, and frankly I am getting frustrated with the camera. Ebay is looking better everyday. I have been tweaking settings trying to learn the camera, but everytime I think I got the settings right, the pictures come out either blurry, dark, or just plain awful. I like the camera, and I am trying to tough it out, but it shouldn't be this difficult to take a decent picture, should it?! <p>Here are my settings:</p>AF,ESP,ISO-50,Digital Zoom-off, Frame Assist-On,<p>Now in M,S,A, mode all of my picture come out super dark, almost like I'm shooting in a dark room, it evens happens outdoor in broad daylight.........
There is nothing wrong with the camera.

FACT...If you set the ISO at 50 it will remain at 50 no matter what " Mode " you have it on "P", "A", "S", "M". YOU must go into the menu>ISO and put it in "AUTO" mode or what ever setting to shoot indoor shots.

If you have your " ALL REST " mode " OFF " this will keep certain settings created by you saved when you turn off and on your camera.
If that mode is "ON" it will put the camera to factory settings every time you power up the camera.
John G. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 19, 2005, 11:37 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
John G.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 248
Default

Think about it this way driving an "automatic " car since day one and then one decides to buy a Jeep with a stick shift.
What will happen ????????????????????????????????????
Well get out the MANUAL and take a few lesson courtesy of the dealer.
John G. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 24, 2005, 6:45 PM   #14
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 4
Default

hitnrun,

I am experiencing the same issues.

And to respond to other comments made, I know alot about computers and I am working my way into digital camera, but know I need to learn more. But I am not a beginner.

The focusing has been unpredictable. The firmware was sent out to deal with the focusing issue. Rarely in computers (and digital cameras are computers) does a firmware patch completely fix something.

Also I find the shutter speeds indoors in quite bright rooms are always very slow, and at a shutter speed of 1/2 or 1/5 I would expect a warning, but that rarely occurs.

I am working on the shutter lock, but getting my fingers used to that requires more experience.

In any event I expected that in P mode, aimed at new users, that the camera should not be alowed a shutter speed below 1/15, and the automatic settings should be almost full proofwith the manual modes are there for the better photographers. This is not the case with this camera.

This is a pro-sumer camera, not a professional camera.

In addition I find the camera slow at storing pictures ... in 8 mp mode it is a turtle.

I should have paid more attention to the review that said this.

I expected that what I saw in the LCD panel would be the picture I got but this isn't true, except in P mode. In manual modes it is way off.

I will keep working at since my 30 day exchnage period is past, but I am frustrated, and I do believe there is something wrong and I also admit I have alot to learn.

I have got some good pictures as well ... it is just the consistency and the shutter speeds.

Should I remove the ultra violet filter ..

Do florescent lights, especially the new compact florescent mess up the meters?

Thanks for the help and the patience




computerman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 25, 2005, 10:25 AM   #15
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

computerman wrote:
Quote:
Also I find the shutter speeds indoors in quite bright rooms are always very slow, and at a shutter speed of 1/2 or 1/5 I would expect a warning, but that rarely occurs.

I am working on the shutter lock, but getting my fingers used to that requires more experience.

In any event I expected that in P mode, aimed at new users, that the camera should not be alowed a shutter speed below 1/15, and the automatic settings should be almost full proofwith the manual modes are there for the better photographers. This is not the case with this camera.
What you think is bright is not (i.e., indoor lighting). The human eye adjusts well to low light (and a well lit interior is low light).But, a camera does not. It must keep the shutter open long enough for proper exposure.

One of the most common mistakes a new user makes is thinking that they can take photos indoors without a flash or tripod.

Sorry, but you'll have motion blur from camera and/or subject movement with virtually all newer non-DSLR cameras without a flash or tripod indoors, unless you set ISO speeds higher (which will increase noise levels).

The "rule of thumb" is that you'll need shutter speeds of 1/focal length or faster. So, if you're at your cameras' full wide angle lens setting (equivalent to a 28mm focal length on a 35mm camera), you'll want shutter speeds of 1/28 or faster. If you're at full zoom (equivalent to 140mm on your model), you'll want shutter speeds of 1/140 or faster (because motion bur from camera shake is greatly magnified as more zoom is used).

This is only a rule of thumb, as some users can hold a camera steadier than others, and other users may require even faster shutter speeds. Now, this "rule of thumb" only applies to motion blur from camera shake, not from subject movement. So, for rapidly moving subjects, faster shutter speeds may be required (or simply use the flash).

Now, lets look at the lighting you have indoors. A well lit interior usually has an EV (Exposure Value, which is a way of measuring light) of around 6 (MUCH darker than you'll have outdoors in daytime, even under overcast skies).

At this light level, at ISO 100, you'd need a shutter speed of around 1/10 second for proper exposure at f/2.4 (the largest available aperture on your model, at it's wide angle lens setting). ISO 64 (where your model starts out) would require even slower shutter speeds. This is far too slow for most users to hand hold a camera. Even if you can hold it steady enough, you'd have motion blur from subject movement with shutter speeds this slow.

So, you'd need to increase ISO speed to get faster shutter speeds (each time you double the ISO speed, the camera can use shutter speeds twice as fast). This will increase noise levels.

If you use any zoom, even slower shutter speeds will be needed for proper exposure (less light reaches the sensor when using zoom with most models).

Bottom line -- indoor lighting is not bright enough to take photos without a flash or tripod, unless you are willling to increase ISO speed (which will increase noise).

See this handy online exposure calculator to get a better idea how EV, Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO speed work together to insure proper exposure of an image -- keeping in mind that the largest available aperture on your model is f/2.4 at wide angle, stopping down to f/3.5 at full zoom. This is actually brighter than most (f/2.4 at wide angle).

http://www.robert-barrett.com/photo/...alculator.html

My advise: use the flash for non-stationary subjects. If you don't like flash, and your subjects are not moving, use a tripod.

Otherwise, you'll need to increase ISO speed (which will result in more noise/grain). If you do decide to increase ISO speed, use a tool like Neat Image or Noiseware to reduce the appearance of noise later.


Ifshooting indoors without without a flash or tripod is a high priority, then you'll want to buy a DSLR (these can shoot at higherISO speeds compared to non-DSLR models) -- making sure to buy a bright lens (es) to go with it. A 50mm f/1.8 lens is a popular low cost lens forthis purpose.


JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 25, 2005, 12:55 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 162
Default

P isn't "aimed at new users," professionals will use P if they find that it provides the correct exposure. I don't meant to sound like a jerk, but I'm tired of reading complaints and criticism re: the 8080 (or any other camera, for that matter) from people who obviously don't know anything about photography and haven't taken the time to learn. The 8080 has the same limitations found in any pro-sumer digicam. Any other problems are your own.

Buya tripod, use a flash, learn something about shutter speeds, or sell your camera and get a true point-and-shoot.






jkusmier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 25, 2005, 7:04 PM   #17
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 4
Default

Thanks Jimc for taking the time to give me the advice.

Some great ideas!!!!

Regarding the comment following yours... forums are a place for people like myself to learn and hopefully one day share. If iwere an expert already I wouldn't need to comment or ask questions in this arena and hopefully be helpful like Jimc was.

The P mode on the Olympus isn't for beginners, as my dealer told me. I only hoped it would be. I believe they could have set the programming for P modeto help beginners a bit more, like automatically adjusting the ISO and shutter speed more conservatively, but they didn't and I need to deal with thisand learn how to make it work.

Cannon he said dealt with this by also adding an automatic choice on some of their cameras.

This forum has set me straight in terms of what have to do!

I now use flash indoors always though will be a problem in some museums and art gallaries where flash is prohibited. I suspect I will manually up the ISO or bring a tripod.

I clearly need to practice the lock and shoot technique.

Does the full time auto focus help when idoors?

Thanks To All






computerman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 25, 2005, 9:48 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
John G.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 248
Default

computerman wrote:
Quote:
In addition I find the camera slow at storing pictures ... in 8 mp mode it is a turtle.


*

*
By your comment you must be shooting in Tiff or Raw.
If that is your preference ...but....
For what it's worth......
I have made side by side comparison of a jpg and Tiff of the same shot. Magnified @ 500 percent in photoshop.

Both pics were so similar that I decided only to use jpg.

What speed card are you using ?
For those who don't know.........
The higher the speed, the faster a camera writes images to the card<<<up-to the max. speed of the camera>>>.


John G. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 26, 2005, 2:46 AM   #19
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 4
Default

A highspeed card is useless in the 8080.. they say.. here are the stats for 8080.
Quoted from myolympus.org..
  • It appears that the 8080 writes with a maximum of 0.9 MByte/s (sustained) to CF cards. [/*]
  • There is no advantage in using CF cards faster than 30x (actually the camera is write-limited to 6x, but we didn't test the write speed with slow CF cards).
    [/*]
  • The maximum write speed to xD cards is 0.8 MByte/s (sustained) . Since xD cards are more expensive than CF cards, the only reason to use xD cards is if you want to use the 8080's inbuilt panorama function. [/*]
  • These write speeds are painfully low. The Olympus 5050 for instance is capable of writing at 2.5MByte/s (sustained) to fast CF cards and manages to write a RAW image to CF in about 3 seconds. The 8080 needs at least 12 seconds to write a RAW image to a memory card. [/*]
geaclaesson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 26, 2005, 12:02 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
John G.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 248
Default

The bottom line for me is image quality. The C8080WZ is by far superior to any 8 megapixel non DSLR that was produced around the same time.
Anyone that shoots in RAW will get " Turtle" speeds with any non DSLR.
Here is what Steve said about The K.M. A200 8 megapixel which he reveiwed in Dec. 2004.
QUOTE[STEVE] " Fine mode imposed a 6-second wait before capturing more shots at 2.3 second intervals, Extra fine imposed a 6.3 second wait then captured an image every 2.6 seconds, and RAW mode captured subsequent shots at 8 second intervals following a wait of 20 seconds. RAW & JPEG quality could not be used in any of the A200's Continuous advance modes."
John G. is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:46 PM.