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Old Dec 29, 2004, 2:05 PM   #1
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I recently purchase an Olympus 8080WZ. So far, most of my photos are just unacceptable for a camera in this price range, and frankly I am getting frustrated with the camera. Ebay is looking better everyday. I have been tweaking settings trying to learn the camera, but everytime I think I got the settings right, the pictures come out either blurry, dark, or just plain awful. I like the camera, and I am trying to tough it out, but it shouldn't be this difficult to take a decent picture, should it?! <p>Here are my settings:</p>AF,ESP,ISO-50,Digital Zoom-off, Frame Assist-On,<p>Now in M,S,A, mode all of my picture come out super dark, almost like I'm shooting in a dark room, it evens happens outdoor in broad daylight. <p>Like I said, I really like this camera, and I am willing to put out the effort to learn it, but I'm getting to the point of no return and the Nikon D70 and Nikon 8800 are starting to look like gold to me. <p>Please help me with my ongoing Olympus 8080 dillemma. <p>Also note: I am new to the digital world and this is my first "High-End" digital camera. I also own a SONY-PSC72, and taking picture with that isn't nearly a headache as it is with the 8080.<p> I almost forgot to mention I have recently updated the firmware for the 8080, and if that doesn't help anything, I may decide to throw this thing off the highway overpass.
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Old Dec 29, 2004, 3:31 PM   #2
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Just to make sure you haven't changed anything that could be impacting exposure, I'd sugget resetting the camera back to factory defaults.

It looks like you'll find an All Reset menu choice to do this under the Setup menu:

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2004_...c8080_pg5.html


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Old Dec 29, 2004, 4:18 PM   #3
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Just did the All Reset thing and also updated the firmware, took it out today, and snapped some test photos. Picutes were a little better, but still on the dark side.
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Old Dec 29, 2004, 4:23 PM   #4
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You may want to make sure you're monitor calibration isn't the problem, too. Here's a site that explains monitor calibration, with links to software to help:

http://www.normankoren.com/makingfineprints1A.html


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Old Dec 30, 2004, 1:04 PM   #5
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I think its the camera and nothing else. I mean the ongoing saga of the camera's inability to focus properly should be proof enough.

I have the same camera. And find it frustrating that a camera of this caliber, can be so unreliable when it come to taking decent, focused, shots.

I took it to a Xmas party recently, and although everyone was impressed by its physical looks and build, 50% of the photographs that were taken were out of focus. So with the Olympus 8080, I think its a toss of the coin as to whether or not your picture will come out clear or not. And you really won't know until you upload the images onto your PC and take a look. The built in LCD can sometimes fool you, thinking you have a clear shot, only to find out later that you photo looks like shit. Good going Olympus. You should have named this camera 5050, because those are the odds that you pictures will "be in focus."

Weren't cameras built to capture memories instead of ruining them.
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Old Dec 30, 2004, 2:07 PM   #6
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Guys... Chances are, you're doing something wrong.

One common mistake is not insuring you have Autofocus Lock before taking a photo. I'd suggest you try half pressing the Shutter Button first, making sureto get a focus lock. Then,press the Shutter Button the rest of the way down to take the photo. This becomes "second nature" after a while.

Another common mistake with newer cameras is using the wrong focus point (since many models have a multi-point focus system built in). Personally, I prefer to use a singe focus point in the center of an image (half pressing the shutter button to get focus lock, reframing if necessary, then pressing the shutter button the rest of the way down). Your Olympus has the ability to use a Single Focus Point (settable as Spot Focus).

Yet another common mistake is trying to take photos indoors without a flash or tripod. This results in shutter speeds that are too slow, so you'll get motion blur from camera shake.

I'd suggest posting some sample photos so users can see what you're talking about (preferrably downsized with an editor like irfanview from http://www.irfanview.com that won't strip out the camera settings from the EXIF header).


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Old Jan 1, 2005, 6:31 PM   #7
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I am sure that you are right JimC. Taking a picture quickly will result in an unacceptably sharp picture. I have had a 8080 about a month and love it. If you have come from the world of SLRs as I have you will know that there are ways to get better pics. I learnt pretty quickly in that respect but there's still a lot to the camaera that I have to get to grips with.
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Old Jan 1, 2005, 7:35 PM   #8
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hittnrunn wrote:
Quote:
Just did the All Reset thing and also updated the firmware, took it out today, and snapped some test photos. Picutes were a little better, but still on the dark side.
there's an easy way to test for the metering and exposure accuracy using the old "sunny 16" rule. For any given film iso speed, the correct exposure, for an average subject,on a sunny day is 1/iso at an aperture off16. So, for an iso of 64, the correct exposurewould be 1/60 at f16, 1/125 at f11, 1/250 at f8, 1/500 at f5.6, etc..

So, on a sunny day, go outside and take a picture of an "average" scene...ie no large sections of pure white or black, with the iso set to 64, the camera set to manual with an aperture of 5.6, and a shutter speed of 1/500. This picture should be properly exposed.

Leave the iso at 64, and repeat this in aperture priority mode with the aperture set to f5.6 and take note of the shutter speed the camera selects.

Likewise, repeat this in shutter priortiy mode with the shutter speed set to 1/500 and take note of the aperture the camera selects.

If the camera is working properly, all the pictures should all be properly exposed.

One final thougt, I know you reset all the settings, but I'd still check to make sure that you don't have the exposure compensation set to a -EV number. Also, don't have a polarizing filter on the camera for this test, it'll throw the numbers out by 2 fstops.

Hope this helps...

Santos


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Old Jan 4, 2005, 4:16 PM   #9
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I haven't had any problems with my 8080 - have you enabled the phase detection system, which will provide for quicker and more accurate AF - particularly for interior shots? Are you using a flash, or trying to handhold at 1/5 or 1/2 sec/ exposures? Have you tried taking pics in Program mode? How are those? Are you sure you're using proper settings in A,S and M (see Santos' post re: the sunny 16 rule)?




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Old Jan 5, 2005, 11:59 AM   #10
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I was curious as to what type of camera a DSC-P72 was, and was surprised to learn that it is a true point-and-shoot, with no user selectable control over aperture, shutter speed, or anything else.

I don't mean to offend, but perhaps you should actually learn something about photography before you criticize the 8080. Do you know what the A/S/M modes are? Have you even taken the time to read the 8080 manual to learn how to adjust aperture and shutter settings, let alone consult other resources to learn WHY you need to adjust them? The pics you took in A/S/M are probably dark because you're using a really fast shutter speed and really small aperture, hence very little light is reaching the imaging sensor.

Switching to a Nikon 8800 or D70 won't help, as they will offer - respectively - as many or more manual controls as does the 8080.

I really don't mean to sound like a jerk, but it sounds as if the root of your problem is that you don't know anything about photography - which is a bit of a problem for a feature-rich camera with full manual controls like the 8080. I would suggest that you set flash to auto/red-eye, set mode dial to "P," and leave the other settings alone while you study your manual - and take a course or read a book on basic photography. Else, I'd suggest trading down to a simpler, point-and-shoot camera, not up to a dSLR.


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