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Old Jan 7, 2003, 8:18 PM   #141
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This thread is really very informative. I just purchased my C-4000Z last week and I haven't stopped taking photos with it since I got it. I really enjoy this camera, and it is sure full of features and options that are found on higher priced digicams. Since the topic is about the focusing issues with the C-4000Z, I would like you all to review my pics to see if my C-4000Z seems okay.

I'm a total newbie with photography, and I need your opinions.

Look at my pics












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Old Jan 8, 2003, 9:24 AM   #142
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jasm and gm, I think both of your pictures are great. Since they are trimmed down, it's kind of hard to really tell the quality of it, but they look in focus and the important thing, the colors look good and without too much noise. I'm going up to Cleveland, OH this weekend, maybe I'll see some snow, or more importantly, something interesting to take a picture of...heh
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Old Jan 8, 2003, 2:51 PM   #143
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Guys, the pics look really fine, but I've only managed a quick look. I'm pretty much out of circulation this week as I'm travelling to London daily to enjoy the delights of a 4-day course on SQL Server 2000, then coming home in the evening and keeping the company website ticking over.

Today it snowed in London. For those who live in some better-organised part of the world and don't know how we British run our transport, that means that chaos ruled on road and rail.

Come Saturday, I'll get a good look and get back to you.

All the best,

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Old Jan 8, 2003, 5:28 PM   #144
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Fenlander
Ta I do feel guilty for my nuisance value I do know see the broader picture and after this I will go away and practice.
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Old Jan 11, 2003, 11:11 AM   #145
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James,

I'd say you're getting well on top of the C4000 now. I'm glad you've switched to Aperture priority - the improvement in these pics is very clear. As you asked for comments, a few specifics:

small waterfall
A crisp picture and I like the movement in the water due to the slow shutter speed. Taken with a tripod? I suspect the picture does not reveal all the charm of the original scene as it can't record the smell of the air!

cart bridge
I think we've seen this before, but you've done a little post processing. I think you've lost some dynamic range - the blacks have been lost and it looks a little wishy-washy. If you restore the shadows and then raise the gamma a little, you get this:
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/fenlander/cb.jpg
I also rotated 1 degree clockwise to set the top of the weir horizontal.

iced duck
A problem scene. The river was shaded and the bank in brilliant sunshine. Result: the highlights on the bank and on some of the ducks are blown. You can crop the bank out of the picture, but the result is not a particularly pleasing composition.
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/fenlander/id.jpg

sawmill waterdriven
I like this one. Again, I think a small improvement is possible by playing with curves in PS or PSP, putting a little more depth into the shadows and nudging the gamma up a little. It's tempting to try cropping so that the mill is on the intersection point of the upper third and left third (rule of thirds), but unfortunately, that means losing the tree on the right. As a composition I think it works better this way - our attention is distracted from the mill by the presence of the tree - but as a record of the scene it loses something.
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/fenlander/sw.jpg

white cart
Nice picture, framing, focus, exposure spot on.

at peace
Much better framed than the earlier version, plus this one is sharp and well exposed. I might crop it a little tighter, but it would be nice to catch the reflection of the face in the water (I assume that there is water there?) if the light is ever right to make that possible.

custodians
Using f6.3 has ensured plenty of depth of field so both lions are sharp. Compositionally, I wonder what the result would have been of taking a couple of steps to the left and zooming out a little so that a) the gateway was fully visible and b) the tree on the left was out of shot. Like the sawmill, a more radical crop makes a different picture which conforms more to the rule of thirds but may not be what you intended when you took the pic. What do you think?
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/fenlander/cus.jpg

rosey
Interesting try at a still life. I'm no expert here, but the version I'm looking at is showing some fairly severe jpeg artifacts, probably from being compressed for the web. To really get the texture in the lace and all the rest of the fine detail, I'd suggest using TIFF for shots like this and shooting lots of variations of lighting and exposure. You really set yourself a challenge by including the candle!

kitchen
Super shot - room shots can be so difficult. By using the low viewpoint, you've avoided perspective problems. Depth of field includes everything from the table left to the dresser in the far corner and exposure is just about spot on. There's just a hint of blown highlights on the jug and the chair on the left: this might perhaps have been avoided by tweaking the C4000's contrast setting down and giving .3 stop less exposure - worth a try, anyway.

Happy clicking

fenlander
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Old Jan 11, 2003, 3:24 PM   #146
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Fenlander,
Thanks once more you have opened a door which tempts me past the pc add on even tho it asks for attempted levels of quality not easily met.I posted one image on sg without realizing what it entailed.I posted a civil question on dpreview Iwas close to buying a c 700 for its 10x lens still keeping the c4000 but it was an intrusion.took 30 exposures today with only 2 any good.Well thanks again for your time and patience I will now carry on trying.
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Old Jan 16, 2003, 7:58 AM   #147
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I have a question regarding what would be the best mode to use for Landscape shots to get sharp well exposed photos. I just received my new c4000 and hope to use it Saturday the 18th when I go Hiking in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Here is a link to my Hiking photo site so you can see the type of conditions I will be taking photos in. http://community.webshots.com/user/casavpa
Most of these were taken by my friend using a casio qv3000 digital camera. I read through all the threads and in one you said you use Manual mode and another Aperature priority mode(could you clear this up for me). I feel comfortable using the AP mode . I have set default metering to spot and changed contrast to -3 in this mode. Do you take all photos at F5.6? How do you know what is the best Aperature to use . Do you use the Highest Aperature that the camera tells you is permissable for a particular scene? If you have any tips on taking photos in winter conditions to get sharp well exposed photos it would be appreciated. I am still reading the manual and have a lot to learn but hope to at least get some decent photos this weekend. I have read the Landscape mode does not give ideal results.
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Old Jan 16, 2003, 11:49 AM   #148
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pacman

To achieve a given exposure, there is a huge range of combinations of aperture and shutter speed. Although these all pass the same amount of light, they may give very different results.

Shutter speeds - the larger the number, the shorter the exposure
Aperture - the larger the number the less light gets through

So 1/100 sec at f5.6 and 1/50 sec at f8 and 1/25 sec at f11 all pass the same amount of light through to the sensor. The actual numbers used for apertures do have a logical explanation, but it's less important to understand it with digital cameras where the range of apertures is continuous rather than based on these fixed "stops".

The classic range of aperture stops is f2.8 - f4 - f5.6 - f8 - f11 - f16. Each time you move one stop to the right, you HALVE the amount of light passing through the lens. To compensate, you would have to DOUBLE the exposure (e.g. 1/50 instead of 1/100 - it can be confusing).

Any time you take a picture, you have to decide what balance of aperture and shutter speed you want to use. Factors to consider are:

1) Almost all lenses perform less well when wide open. The optimum performance of a lens is usually somewhere around f5.6 - f8. At very small apertures, resolution can fall away again.

2) If the subject is moving, you will need a fast shutter speed to freeze the movement.

3) If you're using a telephoto setting, you will need a faster shutter speed to avoid camera shake.

4) If you want maximum depth of field, you need to set a small aperture. Conversely, if you want to throw a background out of focus, use a wide aperture.

Serious landscape photographers always use a tripod, set a small aperture for maximum definition and depth of field and let the tripod take care of the slow shutter speed. If you can't use a tripod, try for a shutter speed of around 1/150 and let the camera take care of the aperture. For wide angle, you can use 1/100 or 1/60.

Sports and wildlife photographers use fast shutter speeds, wide apertures and get very good at focusing accurately because they don't have much depth of field to play with.

If you leave the camera in Program, you shift responsibility for these choices to the camera. In the case of the C4000, the camera seems to believe that every photographer has a shaky hand and doesn't care about depth of field, so it sets a wide aperture (usually f2.8) and a fast shutter speed. This is fine for sports but not what you want for landscapes!

I don't always use f5.6. However, when shooting outdoors in daylight, f5.6 usually combines with a reasonably fast shutter speed and gives a good result, so I tend to leave my cam set to f5.6 in A mode. In bright or dim lighting, the aperture has to be adjusted to suit.

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Old Jan 16, 2003, 12:21 PM   #149
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Default Camera Settings.

Fenlander , thanks for the quick reply. I am getting good results while Using F 5.6 which I have set up in MY mode 1. I have preset SHQ , Iso 100, contrast -3, spot metering. I will also set one up for a manual MY mode 2 and play with that, adjusting Aperature and Shutter speed. Another question, Under MY mode setup there is a selection for AF/MF (default off) and Fulltime AF(default off) Do you recommend keeping the defaults for AF or setting them both on. Finally I have set Iso to 100 as opposed to Auto. Any thoughts on whether auto might be better.
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Old Jan 16, 2003, 1:40 PM   #150
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Pac, if you're going to be shooting snow, then check this out:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...ing_snow.shtml
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