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Old Jan 22, 2005, 1:03 PM   #1
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I like this camera except for the purple haze I get "sometimes" especially when I have shots that involve chrome items as found on my motorcycle. Some areas more than others in the same picture. Is there any help for me other replacing or is this a common problem.

Thanks in advance,

Bigdog
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Old Jan 22, 2005, 9:54 PM   #2
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You haven't told us the model of the camera! Also, it would help us to know what settings you're using, and in what kind of lighting; there are a lot of factors that determine the outcome of an exposure. It would also be nice to see an image exhibiting the phenomenon.

Glad to help, but need more info.

RH
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Old Jan 22, 2005, 10:38 PM   #3
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Thanks for the reply, it's a C-4040 and my shots were usually in the shade or overcast days, early or late before the sun was a factor. As far as settings, it was what the camera wanted not anythingI set. I think ISO at 100 and shots were from a tripod. It also will do this when using a flash. Another weird thing is the pictures of the christmas tree when the lights were on always looked out of focus. I will post some pics tomorrow when I figure out how.

Thanks
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Old Jan 23, 2005, 8:38 AM   #4
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With flash
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Old Jan 23, 2005, 10:49 PM   #5
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Well, it looks like a classic example of purple fringing, and rather pronounced at that. The newer Oly's use high-density lenses that limit purple fringing, but in your case there's really not much you can do about it. I checked around for some other example pics taken with the 4040 (including the review here at Steve's), and found the pronounced fringing in all examples featuring bright highlights.

You can edit out the effect to some degree in your image editor, though you'll need to start with a very high-quality image to avoid posterization and other unsatisfying side-effects. Editing out chromatic aberration also gets tricky when the image has tones that are naturally similar to the color of the fringe.

Perhaps other users of the 4040 can offer their own tips on how they combat purple fringing.

RH
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Old Jan 24, 2005, 7:51 PM   #6
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R_Hyde wrote:
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Well, it looks like a classic example of purple fringing, and rather pronounced at that. The newer Oly's use high-density lenses that limit purple fringing, but in your case there's really not much you can do about it. I checked around for some other example pics taken with the 4040 (including the review here at Steve's), and found the pronounced fringing in all examples featuring bright highlights.

You can edit out the effect to some degree in your image editor, though you'll need to start with a very high-quality image to avoid posterization and other unsatisfying side-effects. Editing out chromatic aberration also gets tricky when the image has tones that are naturally similar to the color of the fringe.

Perhaps other users of the 4040 can offer their own tips on how they combat purple fringing.

RH
After a little investigation of this site and searching other places it looks like I just got a lemon of a camera. It's a shame because this camera cost a bundle when it first came out and now it just seems to be not quite average. Now the next task is trying to decide what to buy next and I'm not really looking forward to it. This is my second oly digital and I have owned two slr's back in the film days that were excellent cameras. I thank you for your help.

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Old Jan 31, 2005, 11:38 AM   #7
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Don't hurry up to discard your 4040. It was one of the best cams in its days and IMO is still a strong competitor. The images you posted are too low in resolution to be judged properly, but they don't appear to be that bad. You can do two things. First shoot in aperture priority mode and if light level permits close down the aperture to around f 5,6. This should reduce purple fringing. Second, the new Paint Shop Pro 9 has a speciall chromatic abberation (purple fringing) removal tool that works very well. You can download a fully functional trial version of PSP9 from JASC website. The filter takses some time to adjust properly, but once its done it is very effective at removing purple fringing without image deterioration. The whole package costs around 100 USD which IMO is a killer dealcompared to PhotoShop. It is better than PS elements.
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Old Jan 31, 2005, 6:26 PM   #8
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Thanks for your reply. I will try your method and see how much we can improve. I have never done either aperture or shutter priority with this camera but did a lot with film cameras when I only shot B&W years ago and only used a hand held meter with everything manual. I do have photoshop on my computer and through the wonders of the internet also found this site with some instructions for purple fringing using photoshop. When I get some time I will try this on my original image to see the difference and also some new shots with your idea. Thanks again for your help.

http://www.bytephoto.com/tutorials/c...berrations.php
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Old Feb 1, 2005, 4:59 AM   #9
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Bigdog wrote:
Quote:
Thanks for your reply. I will try your method and see how much we can improve. I have never done either aperture or shutter priorty with this camera but did a lot with film camers when I only shot B&W years ago and only used a hand held meter with everything manual. I do have photoshop on my computer and through the wonders of the internet also found this site with some instructions for purple fringing using photoshop. When I get some time I will try this on my original image to see the difference and also some new shots with your idea. Thanks again for your help.

http://www.bytephoto.com/tutorials/c...berrations.php
The method described in this site works to a limited extent, but the problem is that it affects the colour of the whole image. The filter in PaintShop Pro9 is better because it removes only a very narrow colour band corresponding to the fringe colour and the rest of the colours are unaffectected. Here is a quick and dirty example of before and after filtration. Mind that these are 100% crops from a 4 MP image.
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