Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Olympus

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Nov 26, 2002, 9:36 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 93
Default Olympus digicam for Graphic Design Photography

Hi, folks. This is my first post, and I need some recommendations. I'm looking to get into graphic design photography, and I would appreciate recommendations on which Olympus C-series (or E-series?) camera would suit this purpose. Two big considerations: I need to be able to make dioptric adjustments because I wear bi-focals; and, I'm not 'made of money.'

Thanks.
Owlz
Owlz is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Nov 26, 2002, 11:54 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 76
Default

I know the C-2100 has dioptic adjustment on the viewfinder. You can find them for aroung $450 for a refurb, either through ebay or online dealers. It's a great camera if you look through some of the posts around here, and read the reviews on it.

The E-10 looks like a great camera and I would love to try one out, but it costs twice as much as the C-2100.
MIDACL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 26, 2002, 11:59 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
marokero's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 769
Default

What kind of work will you be doing with the camera? I've done some business cards and websites with images from an E-10. For me it was a no brainer because I came from using an SLR, and really wanted the manual controls on most everything w/o accessing menus.

It does have a diopter adjustment ring on its viewfinder so you can adjust it to your own needs But so do many other digicams. I've provided my pluses for the E-10, maybe other users can provide you with their own alternatives. The E-10, even though can be found cheap is still more expensive than many digicams out there.
marokero is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 26, 2002, 12:19 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 93
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by marokero
What kind of work will you be doing with the camera? I've done some business cards and websites with images from an E-10. For me it was a no brainer because I came from using an SLR, and really wanted the manual controls on most everything w/o accessing menus.
To be honest, I'm just at the 'getting my feet wet'/researching stage with regards to graphic design. I haven't found anything yet that identifies how digital photography can be used in graphic design. I do know, however, that I've always enjoyed looking at examples of macro-photography and photo-microscopy (though I'm not sure that would fall under the category of graphic design).
Owlz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 26, 2002, 12:58 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 128
Default

Quote:
macro-photography and photo-microscopy
I would think for this kind of work you would want an SLR so you see exactly what the lens is seeing. The E10 or E20 would be my suggestion. The E20 is higher resolution (5 MP vs. 4 for the E10) but it's more money. I have an E20 and love it!
Bert Bigelow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 26, 2002, 1:27 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 292
Default

I have used digital photography this year at our office for everything from graphic design (printing images up to 44"X36") as well as digital movie animation (product input) etc. I did all this with my c-3000 (yes!! 3mps only) and did not need any higher resolution. Photoshop tools have allowed me to "fake" higher resolutions. I think you can pick one up for a very good price.
By the way, i have entered (and been nominated), a photo competition where my 8"X10" print could not be identified as digital.
I believe a lot of people may be persuaded by the media to inadequacies on lesser mp's that the current max.
geof is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 26, 2002, 1:46 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 128
Default

Geof

Quote:
Photoshop tools have allowed me to "fake" higher resolutions
How do you do that in PS? Unsharp mask?

I still think for what he wants to do, an SLR would be better.
Bert Bigelow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 26, 2002, 3:35 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 3,585
Default

"I need to be able to make dioptric adjustments because I wear bi-focals; and, I'm not 'made of money."

The olympus C4040 has dioptric adjustments. I also wear bi-focals and need to adjust after someone else in the family has used the camera. The C4040 has great optics and you can purchase over the web for about $500. Check www.dealtime.com. The C4040 is 4mp with 3X optical zoom, check Steve's review.

The C4000 is another Olympus camera that has dioptric adjustment and is also 4mp. The optics are very good but not as good as the C4040. The cost should be less than $400 at dealtime.com.

The E10 and E20, DSLR cameras, also have the dioptric adjustments. The cost on the E10 is under $750 and the E20 is under $1000. I would like for Santa to deposit the E20 under my Christmas tree, but he told me I have not been that good.
gibsonpd3620 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 26, 2002, 4:36 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 292
Default

hey Bert
I will ephasize trial and error, but the two most effective methods i found were unsharp mask (just like you said) as well as creating a second layer, copying the image and applying a gaussian blur at a partial opacity. It does not give more resolution, but the blurring effect shows much more pleasing pixelation.
geof is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 26, 2002, 8:11 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 128
Default

geof,
I've read about the Gaussian blur...but never tried it. Thanks for the tip.
Bert Bigelow is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 3:29 PM.