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Old Mar 29, 2005, 7:19 PM   #1
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I have been trying for roughly a year now to decide which camera to buy and as you can guess in that time models have come and gone, but hey are they getting better ~ you bet. If I could afford it it would obviously be a digital SLR or as a compromise a Nikon 8800, but I keep on coming back to good old Olympus and with the specs' of the 770UZ well what more could you want, even the dinky remote, I must have read more reports than a retiring headmaster, albeit mine all related to cameras, almost every time it comes back to the picture quality of Olympus and the added benefit of the 2 year warranty. I have just found a site that has the 770 at £224 ~ they have just dropped the price 2 weeks ago ~ by £70 ~ must be a NEW model due out.
Anyway ~ any of you proud 770 owners out there can tell me the pros' and cons 1st hand ! THON ~ you out there, I know you've got one ~ lol ?
Help guys ~ please.
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Old Mar 29, 2005, 10:53 PM   #2
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The only real cons I can see are no image stabilization, noautofocus assist lamp,and proprietary battery. If the cheapy remote bothers you, you can purchase an RM-1 (with the zoom buttons) separately as both work fine with the 770. I have the predecessor (C-750) and love it, but I shoot mostly outdoors in daylight. What little shooting I do indoors is with adequate lighting for the autofocus to work. I also have found some workarounds for low light situations which work.
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Old Mar 30, 2005, 5:46 AM   #3
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Thanks for that, it is appreciated, surely a camera such as Olympus cannot be all that bad in low light situations and indoors, this assumption is based on numerous reports which almost all come up with the findings that the images of Olympus invariably are sharper than virtually all it's competitors.
That zoom must come in soooo handy, all the immages I have checked out with virtually all the other manufacturers are no where near as sharp or have various different problems and at the end of the day anything with Olympus is trouble free for 2 years with that warranty.
I was going to buy the 750uz, a nice little camera, just as I was about to place the order they discontinued it.
One of the main things I want the camera for is dare i say it ~ Eb*y ~ yeh right sad isn't it, but obviously it can double up as an outdoor do it all camera, your comments regarding your little tricks to get around low light situations would be appreciated.
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Old Mar 31, 2005, 11:17 PM   #4
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I traded my Oly 740 for the Pany FZ3. The main reasons were much faster operation and focus of the Pany, plus of course the IS.

However, I have to say that I have *some* buyer's remorse. The pictures from the Oly looked quite a bit better, though the Pany is more consistent. It just seems that if I had a tripod and decent light and took 100 shots with each camera, 7 of the top 10 shots would be Oly's. Also, 9 of the bottom 10 as well.

I'm a little disappointed with the amount of noise in the FZ3, and I liked the colors better from the Oly as well. However, considering that I (and moreso, my wife) hated that I had to lug around my tripod, and the time it took to set it up, I still feel I made the right decision.

Your indoor shooting woes can be helped by buying an external flash. I believe on one or two of the Oly flashes the AF-assist light actually works with the 770, though it isn't mentioned in the manual.
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Old Apr 1, 2005, 6:31 AM   #5
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Thank you for those comments, most useful, I have heard similar tales from other folk in the forums and it always points back to the sharpness/clarity of the Olympus, whilst the 740 is apparently a cracking little camera surely they must have made some progress with the 770. As regards the tripod issue, I am not a happy snapper so I don't think the tripod will be an issue, {I hope} I would imagine the only time when I need the tripod would be for specific pictures, so hopefully it would be set on a lower zoom, most of the time, perhaps you are able to answer that one better, anyway I thank you for your advice.
[align=center][U][b]Can you tell me what the Olys are like for inside work with Macro, ie; loading items onto the like of eBay ?[/align]
You have me a bit confused with this note, does it mean that 7 of the top 10 would be Olys and the bottom 2 would be Olys ?
Quote;
[align=center]"Also, 9 of the bottom 10 as well ???"[/align]
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Old Apr 1, 2005, 10:12 PM   #6
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smokeydeadlegs wrote:
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[align=center]Can you tell me what the Olys are like for inside work with Macro, ie; loading items onto the like of eBay ?[/align]
You have me a bit confused with this note, does it mean that 7 of the top 10 would be Olys and the bottom 2 would be Olys ?
Quote;



[align=center]"Also, 9 of the bottom 10 as well ???"[/align]

The Olys really shine when it comes to macro. There is even a super macro setting allowing even closer shots. I have experimented with it and it is amazing.

Regarding thebac's comments about the best and worst pics being Olympus, it just means that when conditions are right, it will take excellent shots, but if it misfocused or your hands shook too much, or if you were shooting something moving very fast, the Olympus can miss. The moreyou zoom in, the more light you need, and the faster shutter setting you need for certain shots, and without image stabilization, sometimes the shot will be blurry. Also when zooming in, the depth of field narrows, and autofocus will sometimes focus on something closer that's in the way, like a tree branch or a pole, so the subject you're actually after will appear out of focus. Like anything else, once you develop expertise, you can work around these problems.

You asked for low-light workarounds. First, if you use an external flash (usable only on the C-730, C-750, C-755and C-770) such as the Olympus FL-50, there is a built in AF lamp. Barring that, I have used both a flashlight and a laser pointer which projects a geometric shape to enable the autofocus to get a fix. Another method is to set the camera on manual focus, set your focal distance to the approximate distance of the subject, and set aperture priority to around F4.5. Turn on the flash (or use a tripod with available light) and shoot. I haveachieved perfectly focused shots in total darkness using this method. Only problem is that you have to hope your camera is aimed in the right direction. Usually there will be enough light to see something in the viewfinder.

It's amazing, though that the autofocus in the old digitals worked so well in low light. I have an old, old Fuji and Kodak--obsolete for any practical use today, but they focus instantly and easily in complete darkness.

The improvements of the 770 over the 750/755 are stronger built-in flash, higher resolution video and in .avi rather than quicktime, improved zoom speed, supposedly improved shutter lag and recycle times, higher resolution viewfinder.

BTW, the remotes work with the 730, 750, 755, 770. That's something the Olys have over the Panasonics.
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Old Apr 2, 2005, 2:33 AM   #7
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hakaplan explained what I meant better than I did.

The Oly would take both the best and the worst pictures.

AF was sometimes an issue (especially indoors), it seems the FZ3 is more consistent. However, under ideal conditions, the Oly pictures were just better. I'm hoping to figure out a workaround as I haven't had the FZ3 for very long yet, but it's frustrating because with the Oly the pictures already came out just right. Of course, what frustrated me with the Oly were occasional bad focus and camera shake, so you win some, you lose some. I just wish Oly came out with a successor to the UZI.

And as hakaplan already said, it does macro quite well. I used mine for eBay as well.
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Old Apr 2, 2005, 3:33 PM   #8
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thebac wrote:
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Of course, what frustrated me with the Oly were occasional bad focus and camera shake, so you win some, you lose some. I just wish Oly came out with a successor to the UZI.
I read somewhere, maybe on this board, that the last Olympus to have IS was the C-2100, and the technology they used belonged to Canon, meaning they had to pay a lot for the rights to use it. Unless they develop their own IS, I doubt you'll see it anytime soon. I think Olympus sees the UZ cameras as novelties, which they market to less serious users. They do have lots of features, but that's a function of the firmware--basically you write one program and then just cut and paste aaccordingly based on the particular camera. But when it came to things like the tripod mount, they used plastic. The rotary selector has a setting for each "scene" mode, but A, S, and M have to share a single position--they're the only manufacturer to do that on their high zoom. Theirconcentration has been on making them smaller, meaning the sensor has to stay small. They're still great cameras, but it's almost by accident, andI think it's the end of the line for them--there's really nowhere to go.

My guess is that Olympus will focus on their higher megapixel cameras and possibly extend their zoom capabilities, but not to the point of needing IS.
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Old Apr 2, 2005, 5:57 PM   #9
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hakaplan wrote:
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thebac wrote:
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Of course, what frustrated me with the Oly were occasional bad focus and camera shake, so you win some, you lose some. I just wish Oly came out with a successor to the UZI.
I read somewhere, maybe on this board, that the last Olympus to have IS was the C-2100, and the technology they used belonged to Canon, meaning they had to pay a lot for the rights to use it. Unless they develop their own IS, I doubt you'll see it anytime soon. I think Olympus sees the UZ cameras as novelties, which they market to less serious users. They do have lots of features, but that's a function of the firmware--basically you write one program and then just cut and paste aaccordingly based on the particular camera. But when it came to things like the tripod mount, they used plastic. The rotary selector has a setting for each "scene" mode, but A, S, and M have to share a single position--they're the only manufacturer to do that on their high zoom. Their concentration has been on making them smaller, meaning the sensor has to stay small. They're still great cameras, but it's almost by accident, and I think it's the end of the line for them--there's really nowhere to go.

My guess is that Olympus will focus on their higher megapixel cameras and possibly extend their zoom capabilities, but not to the point of needing IS.
Technically, I think the last one was the EZI, the E-100RS, which was an incredible camera for its own reasons (15FPS, are you kidding me?). I read the same thing you did, though, that Oly actually doesn't have the IS technology and actually got it from Canon (used the same lens as the one on the Pro90 IS).

I agree that the Oly has a bunch of other little things I dislike (like the fact that A/S/M share one spot on the knob--why do you have to access it through a menu?--I see that you share the same frustration) and the plastic tripod mount (I have much cheaper cameras that have a metal mount)--I didn't break it, but I was always concerned that I would.

I did like the build quality of my 740 though (though my 700, not as much).

I'm just disappointed since they were one of the early leaders in the consumer digicam UZ market, but you're probably right, they never developed their own IS, I think even their SLR lenses don't have IS.

As far as making them smaller, the biggest limitation is actually the lens, I believe. Whether you put a 1/1.8" sensor or a 1/2.5" sensor in doesn't make much of a difference in-camera, it's just that you can cut the length of the lens by 20%.
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Old Apr 2, 2005, 6:26 PM   #10
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thebac wrote:
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I did like the build quality of my 740 though (though my 700, not as much).

I'm just disappointed since they were one of the early leaders in the consumer digicam UZ market, but you're probably right, they never developed their own IS, I think even their SLR lenses don't have IS.

As far as making them smaller, the biggest limitation is actually the lens, I believe. Whether you put a 1/1.8" sensor or a 1/2.5" sensor in doesn't make much of a difference in-camera, it's just that you can cut the length of the lens by 20%.
Yes, but for the same number of megapixels, doesn't a smaller sensor produce more noise? And if Olympus were going to move up to 5MP wouldn't they have to increase the size of the sensor?

And, yes, I definitely like the build quality of my 755. And one thing I will say about Olympus, and I don't know if it was accidental or they actually put thought into it, but I think their cameras are some of the most ergonomic and universally operable cameras. I wear glasses all the time and use my left eye to shoot. Try doing that with a Fujiwhile trying to operate the zoom button. Your thumb is caught between the back of the camera and your glasses. Olympus almost always puts their viewfinder on the far left side and keeps the zoom lever around the shutter button or on top of the smaller cameras. You can use your thumb to actually hold the camera and therefore don't have to keep shifting hand position to operate the zoom. And you can easily use either eye in the viewfinder. I had to narrow down my choices to Olympus, Panasonic and Canon for these reasons, andamong the three, when I pick upthe Olympus it feelsthe mostnatural in my hands. For this reason more than any other, it's likely I'll continue to use it until it dies.
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