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Old Dec 11, 2002, 6:46 AM   #1
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Default olympus C-720 finer points

hello, I have recently purchased an Oly C-720 which I consider the
best thing since sliced bread. Now that I have got a few decent basic shots I want to get a bit arty. I would like to know if there is a web site out there dealing with the finer points of this camera ie contrast, appature, WB, shutter speed ect as I find the manual a little limited. Thanks. BD.
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Old Dec 11, 2002, 8:25 AM   #2
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Well, there's the PDF reference manual on the CD which is more detailed, but to learn about photography settings in general head to http://www.photocourse.com/ which has a free online "book" about digital photography with examples.

Olympus also has a free online course about the C-720 at http://www.olympusamerica.com/cpg_se...efault=1&val=5

Also, there's a Yahoo group dedicated to the C-7x0 series of cameras (700/720/730) at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Oly_C-700/ where they discuss various aspects of the cameras and they have bi-weekly photo assignments to encourage you to go out and shoot the particular subject given and people then vote on the ones they like.

Mike (Oly C-700 user for 4 months)
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Old Dec 11, 2002, 10:02 AM   #3
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I am considering an Olympus 720 or 730 but am leery of the delay which many digital cameras have between the time you push the shutter and the formation of the image. I am used to a high end Nikon SLR but do not want to put out $2000 or so to get a Nikon which would use my SLR lenses.
Any comments on this? I know that earlier Olympus digital cameras did have a half second or so delay which I found very aggravating.
Also, how is the quality of the 8 or 10 x zoom?
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Old Dec 11, 2002, 10:57 AM   #4
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Re: godspeedwsa's comments...

What you're referring to is called "Shutter Lag" and all digital and autofocus film cameras have it...it's the time it takes to auto focus, set the exposure, and other things like white balance...before it can take the picture.

You can reduce that time by pressing the shutter button halfway down which sets the autofocus, etc...and then press fully when you want to take the picture.

Also, you can use the manual features to reduce the time even more.

Note that you may not be as happy with the 720 as with the 730...the 720 lacks many features like manual focus, external flash connector, and other things.
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Old Dec 12, 2002, 2:46 AM   #5
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Thanks Mike thats shit hot!!
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Old Dec 12, 2002, 4:28 PM   #6
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Does the 720 suffer from a lot of noise like the 730?

I have the 730 and find it quite noisey for indoor shots. Yes I've read all the threads.
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Old Dec 15, 2002, 8:33 AM   #7
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If you think your indoor shots are too noisy--do you have ISO set to AUTO? This could account for it, as the light level goes down, it will keep upping the ISO. On a camera like these, 400 is worthless. Set the ISO to 100 instead of AUTO, and let the flash do its work. Don't have SLOW SYNCH set unless you know how to deal with very slow shutterspeeds, or you will trade noisy for blurred. You should now get beautiful shots.

About shutter lag---as suggested, anticipation is the first line of defense. I can shoot daylight sports with my C3000 by simply locking on the player and tracking, or lock onto the anticipated point of drama, such as a soccer goal, home plate, whatever. At night, I found that no matter what, that damn pre-flash is going to kill the shot. So I ALWAYS use a NON-dedicated flash for indoor sports like volleyball and basketball. Set camera to manual exposure, white balance preset to daylight, internal flash OFF, and the NON-Olympus flash (I use my Nikon SB24) set to AUTO or MNUAL, your choice, but I recommend AUTO. Now you can track the player, and fire instantly at the peak of action. Photography still takes a little technique and practice, if you want to get the most out of it!

BTW, I used to use a generic flash bracket and Olympus FLCB-04 to hook up a flash. After I got my C4040, FL40, and Olympus bracket, I found it much easier to just remove the FL40 from the bracket and slide on another flash for this type of shooting. The Olympus hotshoe is standard size for NON-dedicated use, so I can just slide in the Nikon flash with no cable to attach, since the cable runs from camera to bracket. Even if you don't have the Olympus flash, I would now recommend the bracket and FLcb-01 cable if you are going to do a lot of action flash photography. The cost will be higher than the generic bracket and FLCB04, but it is a much more efficient solution. I now leave my C4040 and bracket coupled continuously. If I want to use off-camera flash, I use a hotshoe adapter (in my case, a Nikon AS15) to the flash. Heck, I think a Nikon 35mm user can get more utility from Olympus non-SLR digicams than from Nikon non-SLR digicams.
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