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Old Feb 11, 2003, 9:30 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gmlasam
Incredible pics the_oz!!! Where you using any filters for those night pics?? Also, what telephoto lense do you use, if any?
Thanks GMLASAM. To answer your questions, I wasn't using any filters or any telephoto lenses, and the photos were not corrected by Photoshop or Camedia. So, what you see is what my C-4000 saw while mounted on a tripod. "Rue Dollard" was captured at the wide angle setting to capture the vehicle lights, and "Outside..." was captured using maximum Optical zoom (but not digital zoom) to capture the factory smoke.

Do you carry a true-white card around? That's what I use all the time to measure the white balance, especially during night shots (hate that yellow tinge from the street lights). In very low light like "Outside...", you'll achieve that blue tinge without adding extra blue. And, I find it more accurate than using the Presets.

The only thing I don't like about the C-4000 is the 16sec. max shutter speed. I would have preferred 30 or 60 seconds. Olympus America does not have any future firmware updates for the C-4000 when I last e-mailed them.

Regards,

Oz
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Old Feb 11, 2003, 10:33 PM   #12
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Hmmm..you know I read somewhere about adjusting the white balance using plain white printing paper to adjust the white balance somewhere. How do you do that with the C-4000Z? I sometimes get yellow tints in my night pics, specially if I'm doing a macro shot in a very low light situation.
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Old Feb 11, 2003, 11:01 PM   #13
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GM,

I think you just go menu>mode>pic>white balance>spot balance (or whatever it's called)...select it, point the camera at something white, push "ok" again, and your camera is white balanced...

I'm doin' this by memory...don't have the camera or manual with me tonight.
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Old Feb 11, 2003, 11:18 PM   #14
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Quote:
Thanks GMLASAM. To answer your questions, I wasn't using any filters or any telephoto lenses, and the photos were not corrected by Photoshop or Camedia.
For a moment there I thought for sure that you used some sort of star effects filters, by the looks of the street lights. :shock:
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Old Feb 12, 2003, 5:24 AM   #15
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Here are a few I took the other week - comments welcome.

http://www.pbase.com/jabats/night_shots

Tim
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Old Feb 12, 2003, 11:23 AM   #16
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Hyun -> I think longer exposures are the cause for the star effect. I also thought for a minute that it could also be the aperture, but after looking at JABTAS' stuff, I ruled it out. I thought that the star effect is normal on unfiltered cameras anyway. :?

Gmlasam -> As RYCH26 said, it's under Picture->WB->One-touch when you hit your menu screen. I recommend a truly white card of course. Certain types of paper are not exactly 100% white. I had to had help from a fellow Olympus owner to tell me what's white. When manually adjusting White Balance, adjust it under your main light source. For example, my friend showed (literally) me two different light sources. One was the sunlight penetrating the office window, and the other was an overhead fixture in the office. If my subject was heavily exposed using sunlight, then I should adjust my WB using that sunlight, and vice versa. This is what I was taught to do if I wanted to capture the right colours in any condition. Also, I do not use the flash when adjusting the white balance if I am not using the flash for my shot (yes, the flash will activate if the light is too low if you're adjusting WB).

Hope that helps,

Oz
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Old Feb 12, 2003, 7:57 PM   #17
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Thanks OZ and RYCH26,

I found it, but where did you get that white card you speak of OZ?
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Old Feb 12, 2003, 10:34 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gmlasam
I found it, but where did you get that white card you speak of OZ?
I'm sure regular 8x11 plain white printer paper would do the trick. You just need a big enough size to fill the LCD frame when you hold out the paper to set the WB. I seriously needed help in determining what actually is true white. I thought our office walls were white, but I was told it had a hint of grey. So, if you're in doubt, you might want to ask a fellow photographer for a second opinion.

Regards,

Oz
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