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Old Mar 18, 2003, 8:03 PM   #1
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Old Mar 18, 2003, 9:57 PM   #2
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I've got two of those...

Still like my old AE-1!
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Old Mar 19, 2003, 12:13 AM   #3
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Yup, those Canon AE-1 are great!!! To this day, they still take great photos. I'm looking for a dedicated 35mm slide/film scanner to allow me to transfer some 35mm slides and negatives taken with my Canon AE-1 cameras.

Any suggestions? Flatbed scanners, I heard do not work well with scanning slides and negatives. Must use a dedicated 35mm slide/film scanner that are designed only to scan slide and films.
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Old Mar 19, 2003, 12:26 AM   #4
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I can't help you...I'm a newbie at the digital stuff and need to get better at it before I start trying to scan in my old shoeboxes full of negatives and slides.

But in the future I'll probably be in the market for one of those scanners as well.
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Old Mar 19, 2003, 3:03 AM   #5
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Flatbed scanners don't work for scanning slides unless you have a transparancy lid/device. There are dedicated slide scanners, but most are expensive. One of the more affordable ones is the Primefilm 1800i/u/silver series (you can usually find one of these models at Costco) which scan at 1800dpi optical, or one of Primefilm's more expensive models like the 3600Pro (scans at 3600x3600dpi optical). Check out http://www.scanace.com/en/product/product.php
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Old Mar 19, 2003, 4:34 AM   #6
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Thanks for the info...pretty expensive...do you think that they'll drop in price over time, as most things do?...I would think that there'd be a pretty good demand as dig photography continues to grow.

Do you have any info on hardware that will sort out my shoeboxes full of negatives? :lol:
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Old Mar 19, 2003, 5:58 AM   #7
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Default Scanning Slides

For scanning slides I found a surprising solution:

Using the Super Macro feature, the 4000z camera turned out to be a perfect high resolution slide scanner.

I own a little box with a small low voltage incandescent lamp in it and a top of opaque glass. I once built this little box for adjusting and mounting stereo slides. Secondly, I am using a plastic cap of a spraycan, a hole cut in the cap, wide enough for the inner lens tube of the camera.

When I want to copy a slide, I put the slide on top of the opaque glass, put the plastic cap over it and finally put the camera on top, pointing down, the inner lens tube inside hole of the the plasic cap, the camera resting on the cap with the front of the outer lens tube. This way the camera has a good support. I hope that this description makes sense to you.

Camera settings:

WB incandescent, ISO 400 (depends on lamp brightness), Super Macro, Aperture Mode f=5.6, Autofocus=iESP.

The results were very satisfactory. Of cause you have to experiment with the length of the plastic cap, and of cause you have to rotate and center the setup again and again. There is a lot of room for improvement, if you want to do this more often and if you have the time.

I was already thinking of modifying a simple slide viewer by cutting off the viewer lens and most of the lens tube. What you get from the slide viewer is the opaque back and an exact positioning of the slide or even the uncut film. This way you can also scan your negatives. Again, the camera itself is a superb scanner.

You should be aware that the resulting pictures will have a considerable barrel distortion, though. This distortion is not lens-related but is for geometrical reasons. I am using a customized setting of the "remap" feature of PANORAMA TOOLS to correct this distortion.

I am sorry that there is no easy way to attach sample pictures in this forum.

Regards, Herbert
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Old Mar 19, 2003, 7:17 AM   #8
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Herbert...that's fascinating...you must really be a tinkerer! :lol:

Quote:
This way you can also scan your negatives.
What software will read the scanned negatives and convert them?
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Old Mar 19, 2003, 4:53 PM   #9
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Default Scanning Negatives

Rych,

Scanning negatives with the C4000z is no problem. You get a correct digital image. But converting from negative to positive is not so easy. You have to subtract the orange mask from the negative first.

I am still using Paintshop 5.3, which is not so suited for this task. I understand that it can be done best with Photoshop. Maybe somebody else has more information.

Regards, Herbert
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Old Mar 19, 2003, 7:54 PM   #10
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Great tip HerbertRD, but wouldn't setting the iso to 400 increase noise? I will go try this tip out. Thanks for posting it.
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