Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Olympus

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 24, 2003, 12:19 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 12
Default Tips & Tricks for C-4000Z

COuld anyone tell me the tips and tricks for c4000z?? I just bought one...few days ago...been wondering about the features....hehehe! Thanxx!
ambientscape is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Mar 24, 2003, 12:22 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 240
Default

Well, two things come to mind:

- there is an undocumented control mode, where you can control the camera--including taking time-lapsed photos--via the USB cable attached to the computer. Do a web search for "Cam2Com".

- learn to use the "My Modes" settings--they are very flexible and powerful. I've got three programmed so far and the one I use the most is Super Macro with Continuous Auto Focus. Very handy for taking close-up pictures.

Have fun with it!
Hyun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 25, 2003, 8:42 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 1
Default

New C-4000 owner too. Any useful "My Modes' settings?
I got all my informs from this forums, thanks all
zfc6e is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 25, 2003, 11:31 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 1,910
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by zfc6e
New C-4000 owner too. Any useful "My Modes' settings?
I got all my informs from this forums, thanks all
The My Modes settings you use depends on what you want to shoot...for instance one person may use one of them for the defaults they want to use while shooting super macro if they do a lot of closeup work...another may go to a lot of concerts and have it set the defaults best for that...a third may do a lot of landscape photography and have a My Mode for that. It all depends on what YOU shoot...that's why they call it MY Modes.
Mike_PEAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 26, 2003, 12:27 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
fenlander's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 251
Default

Many of the settings on the C4000 are not self-cancelling. If you turn flash on or set autofocus to ESP or whatever, the setting remains like that until you remember to change it back. This can catch you out and you find you've taken 40 outdoor pix on incandescent white balance because you happened to use it the previous evening or shot an unrepeatable series at 640x480 by mistake.

I keep MyMode 1 set to my most standard setup, as follows:

Mode: aperture priority
Fno: f5.6
Exp compensation: 0
Zoom: 50mm
Flash: off
Spot/macro: off
Timer: off
Drive: single shot
AF/MF: AF
ISO: 100
Flash compensation: 0
Flash: IN
Flash curtain: Slow
N/R: off
Digital zoom: off
Fulltime AF: off
AF mode: Spot
Supermacro: off
2 in 1: off
Function: off
Info: on
Histogram: off
Picture mode: SHQ
WB: auto
WB+/-: 0
Sharpness: -3
Contrast: -3
Saturation: 0

This is my standard shooting mode. Whatever strange and unusual settings I might have been using in any other mode, shifting to MyMode 1 switches everything back to default. No more flashes at evening matches on the Centre Court or other embarrassments.

fenlander
fenlander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 27, 2003, 8:47 AM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 18
Default

fenlander: Your "MyMode 1" settings are ideal for what type of conditions? v/r
jag147 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2003, 12:37 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
fenlander's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 251
Default

Outdoor shots in good light where you don't want the flash to fire and want good depth of field.

You're in Aperture priority, so you can vary exposure via the aperture to suit different light levels or depth of field requirements. You can select any settings you want while you're in this mode - turn the flash on, set supermacro, whetever.

The point is, whenever you re-enter this mode, all the odd settings are reset to OFF. That means you're not going to snap a quick series of the bank heist across the street, race off to the local TV station to sell your scoop and find that they were all in supermacro 2-in-1 or whiteboard. Neither is the flash going to go off unexpectedly and attract unwelcome attention your way. Unlikely, I know, but you get the idea...

fenlander
fenlander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2003, 2:36 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 116
Default

Fenlander,

I really enjoy your informative and authoritative posts...

You go to a lot of work, even to the point of working on other's problem pics to help them and I must compliment you for it.

My MyMode1 settings are nearly the same as yours...I only cut the sharpness and contrast setttings down to -1, though...still trying to learn where I like them set the best.

One thing that I do, and I wonder if this makes sense, is that I have the White Balance set on "sunlight"...I do this because often I am attracted to unusual lighting and am actually kind of trying to capture the tone/color of it and the auto white balance will throw that off by trying to "correct" it...I think of the the "sunlight" setting for white balance as kind of like using "daylight" film in a chemical camera...it will see light closest to what it really is (sees incandescent ligh as yellow, fluorescent light as blueish, etc.)

Most of the rest of my shots are either outdoors or are using a flash anyhow, which should be balanced for daylight or sunlight.

And I can always quickly change it to auto if needed.

I took a picture of an indoor carousel...it isn't a real effective shot, but was even less so when the auto white balance killed what I thought was the interesting incandescent lighting it had. (I wish I had saved the one I took on Auto to show you, but I deleted it)...when I set the WB to sunlight, it took it exactly as I thought I was seeing it.

http://www.pbase.com/image/15544257

Does this make any sense?

BTW...sorry the picture file is so large...I'm going to reload them all as smaller files when I get a bit of time...I'm still learning this stuff.
rych26 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2003, 4:32 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
fenlander's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 251
Default

rych,

Yes, that makes complete sense. Your photo has a really nice sense of movement and colour: I can see how auto WB would have killed it.

It may be the English climate, but sunshine is not usually a daily event here. A sunny day is when the sun appears occasionally between clouds and showers. In those conditions, you either have to keep changing the WB or if you leave it on sunny, many of the pics will be too blue. Now, if I lived in California...

Paint Shop Pro has a very useful one-click function to change a picture's colour balance and I find that most of my pics pass through this stage when I process them. Just as an example, here is your pic adjusted (from the top down) for 2500 Kelvin, 4100 Kelvin (as original) and 9300 Kelvin.

fenlander



fenlander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 29, 2003, 1:02 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 116
Default

Thanks, Fenlander...

The bottom picture (9300 kelvin) is, if I remember right, pretty close to what I got with Auto WB.

You can't be serious...I know by looking at Steve6's pictures that the sun is always shining in the UK.
rych26 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 3:59 PM.