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Old Apr 6, 2006, 1:19 AM   #21
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True, it only raises the ISO and thus, the shutter speed. It also disables changing the ISO and most other settings. You can change the flash mode but thats about it. It does not have real image stabilization. It is however, the best camera on the market for the money.
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Old Apr 6, 2006, 11:26 PM   #22
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so i did indeed go out and buy the stylus sw and -- so far -- am very happy with it. For what i wanted -- a small camera that i could carry around in my pocket and quickly snap pictures with -- it fits the bill perfectly. As an added bonus, the viewfinder in the far corner means that you don't have to hold the camera with a lot of finesse -- no worry about accidentally touching the lens -- which has allowed me to carry a coffee in one hand, take the camera out, turn it on and take a picture with the other. now, that's impressive.

picture quality has also been good so far. still trying out all the various modes and options to find the optimal settings though. which leads me to my question: is there anywhere to go to find out exactly how the 28 scene modes are programmed? i rather miss the manual settings on my larger camera, and am wondering whether -- if i knew the shutter speed / aperture size/range etc that the various modes are preset to -- i could fake some manual controls by choosing the right mode setting.

not sure if the question even makes sense, but welcome any comments!
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Old Apr 7, 2006, 2:16 PM   #23
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Good question arhcadia. I too like the camera despite my disappointment with the, so called, digital image stabilization. The closest I've come to deciphering the pre-programmed scene modes is taking photos of the exact same scene using different modes and then looking at the camera settings by viewing the photo "properties" on my computer - usually a right click option when clicking on the image file. Hope this helps a little.
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Old Apr 13, 2006, 7:14 PM   #24
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I initially found this forum because of the lack of reviews of the olympus stylus 720 SW camera, I read the comments here and just decided to buy the camera. I'm no pro but I love taking pictures, I do a lot of biological field work and I require a durable camera that can keep up with my rugged routine. I had the olympus stylus 400 and liked pretty much everything about it except for the fact that I couldn't take action shots and that it wasn't water proof.
Anyhow, I've only used the 720SW a few times but I must say it takes decent pictures. I feel like the flash works a greater distance in this camera than the 400 and action shots come out typically clearer. The autofocus is sometimes annoying but that would be the case in any camera I think. The zoom to me is amazing-- probably because of my naivete in terms of today's digital cameras.
Today I put it under water for the first time to take pictures of fish going up a ladder. In low light, using the under water wide 1 setting it took really cool pictures. I thought it was incredible. They came out clear and bright. I wanted to write this review based on this experience however. I'm very excited about this camera's under water capabilities and the quality of pictures it produces in this environment but a warning: the window area where the lense is is covered by glass and has a metal door over all of that that opens and closes, even after shaking the camera off and carefully wiping it, for a few hours afterwords there was still water on the inside of the metal door so when I went to take landscape pictures they were blurred. I didn't have a microfiber cloth with me so I left it alone---I'd hate to scratch the window. Eventually, the water seemed to go away and the camera's performance was never affected.
My advice: if you know you're going to be shooting under water, bring a microfiber cloth with you and some packets of dessicant. I haven't read any other reviews covering this matter but if you have any advice for me I'd love to hear it. For example, the dessicants will get rid of the water and condensate but will they effect the gasgets inside? Is it safe to use this microfiber cloth on the glass over the lense? What if it's still spotty should I use eyeglass cleaner on the glass?

I know this is lengthy for my first post, but this may help someone??
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Old Apr 15, 2006, 1:34 PM   #25
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I have also been looking for reviews on the camera with little luck. I was almost sold on Casio's EX Z-850 until I read the reviews re: jaggies when taking video. Could somebody who has the 720 SW please comment on the video product. If there are not jaggies present, I think I've found a winner.


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Old Apr 23, 2006, 1:03 AM   #26
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The "Image Stabilization" is not optical or mechanical, but is the ISO version dreamed up by the marketing department.

I just picked up my 720 SW four days ago. I had been holding off going digital because after switching from film SLRs to range finders, I refused to retreat to the digital SLRs and the non SLR digitals were of too poor a build quality. Also, my Ricoh GR1v gave me a new standard for compact cameras. The 720 SW specs convinced me to take the plunge.

The camea has met all my expectation. Some observations:
1)The camea tends to over expose slightly. I find setting exposure compensation at -.7 corrects most of the problems.
2)The LCD is hard to read in sunlight. I hope a Delkin hood wll fit and solve the problem.
3)The underwater snapshot mode has an autofocus lock. Why did Olympus not make this available in all modes is beyond comprehension!
4) ISO 200 and 400 are very useable with noise reduction applied. 800 may make it for B&W because the noise looks like grain and may not be so objectionable particularly after applying noise reduction.

Some things that keep the camera from being almost perfect:
1) Aperture and Shutter preferred modes
2) Full manual modes for aperture and shutter speed
3) Manual focus settings like the Ricoh GR1v. Wth such short focal length lens {at full zoon only 20mm) 4 or 5 zones between infinity and normal minmum distantce work better and faster that an electornic drive.

As time permits I will post some images on my mac.com web site.

David
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Old Apr 23, 2006, 1:07 AM   #27
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Correction to my previous post.

The next to the last paragraph should start:

Some of the MISSING...........

David
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Old Mar 24, 2009, 1:58 PM   #28
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Its been a while since the last post to this topic. My 720 SW never leaves the screen "One Moment" after plugging it into a computer and pressing the PC option. Has anyone had ths experience. Is there a solution? I have tried it in 4 different computers (2 Macs, 2 WinXPs). Everything else seems to work. Any help out there?
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