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-   -   Flip the Wolf Spider (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/panasonic-leica-29/flip-wolf-spider-61582/)

fmoore Jul 18, 2005 8:46 PM

FZ5 with bmacro at ~8x zoom; f8, 1/250s, -2ev, -2 onboard flash

http://www.artmags.com/fz5/spidertop.jpg

http://www.artmags.com/fz5/spiderbottomy.jpg

oprakitas Jul 18, 2005 9:25 PM

I love #1.

pappy Jul 19, 2005 5:35 AM

These are great flash pics fmoore :cool:i like them both #2 shows the many different colors and desighns spiders have developed over time .

Stoney79 Jul 19, 2005 11:46 AM

Good pictures!

But this is not a wolf spider. Wolf spiders are hunting spiders. They don't build webs. This is an orb web spider (which I cannot specify more precisely as I don't know the american spiders).

fmoore Jul 19, 2005 12:32 PM

Stoney79 wrote:
Quote:

But this is not a wolf spider. Wolf spiders are hunting spiders. They don't build webs. This is an orb web spider (which I cannot specify more precisely as I don't know the american spiders).
Stoney - I'm going to check with you from now on regarding spider shots. My knowledge of spiders is very limited. I was basinga quess on your reply to an earlier spider at http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...mp;forum_id=23 This current one has what appears to be a cross on its back. Is there a Jesus spider? (No offence intended.)



Stoney79 Jul 19, 2005 1:19 PM

There are some orb web spiders in europe which are called "Kreuzspinnen". Translated to english it would be "cross spiders".

If you're interested in spiders maybe it's the best to get some literature.

fmoore Jul 19, 2005 1:39 PM

Right again, Stoney.





Garden Spider (Araneus diadematus)
(aka Cross Spider)


http://www.arthurgrosset.com/mammals...aradia3363.jpg
Edinburgh, Scotland
September 2001
These are common spiders found in gardens and also known as Cross Spiders because of the white cross pattern on the back.
They belong to a group known as Orb Spiders because of the large orb webs that they spin which can be up to one metre in diameter.




The webs are built by the larger females who usually lie head down on the web, as in this photo, waiting for prey to get entangled in the web. The prey is then quickly captured and wrapped in silk before being eaten. Orb Spiders are said to eat their webs each night along with many of the small insects stuck to it. They have been observed doing this within a couple of minutes. A new web is then spun in the morning.
The much smaller male will approach the female cautiously in order to mate. If not careful, he could end up being eaten by her.




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