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-   -   Peaceful; Alone in a crowd (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/panasonic-leica-29/peaceful%3B-alone-crowd-55439/)

nooner May 13, 2005 11:31 AM

Nice shot. The crane could be cropped out.

willow1 May 13, 2005 2:48 PM

i like this shot suze:G

HarjTT May 13, 2005 3:50 PM

nooner wrote:
Quote:

Nice shot. The crane could be cropped out.
Suze

I like the shot .. agree with Noons on may be cropping teh crane out. Also any close ups from the gang way ?

Harj

PS

Where in the Uk did you take the pic suze ?

Stoney79 May 13, 2005 4:12 PM

Nice idea, but I wouldn't have centered the boat.

NickTrop May 13, 2005 7:47 PM

Ready for a left-field comment? This shot made me think of the movie Psycho by Alfred Hitchcock. The production designer, Saul Bass, worked with Hitch for a visual motif that is used in most scenes in the film. That visual motif was to have narrow verticle lines, intersecting larger horizontal planes. It was done to subliminally suggest the visual of the human body being stabbed. Such "criss-crossing" indeed results in a "violent" composition and psycholgical turbulence.

Two obvious examples of this motif in action were the opening title sequence (obviously), and the long narrow house on the hill where Norman/Norman's "mother" lived, and the long flat Bates Motel itself. The house was deliberately shaped thin, "pointy" narrow, suggestive of a knife, which in many scenes, was composed to "penetrate" the long flat horizontal line of the Bates Motel, which was a visual metaphore for the human body. Insane Norman "lived" (or was the soul) of the house/knife. The victim's "soul" occupied the motel/body.

Your composition has these identicle elements, intended or otherwise, it is oddly unsettling in that it is a tranquil scene, but the criss-crossing horizontal and verticle lines are suggestive of violence.

Interesting composition, regardless if it was intended or a happy accident. There is a lot going on in this picture - in your subconscious decision to consider it suitable subject matter, and take it in the first place, and your decisions in how it was composed, that speaks about its author. Often our "art" - and our choices when we make it, engages all the mind's components - conscious and otherwise, and puts more of our inner-self on display than we intend it to. ;)

Peaceful, alone in a crowd, but with a lot on her mind. The viewer hopes she finds peace and tranquility.

Thanks for sharing.

Hiroshi May 13, 2005 9:45 PM

NickTrop wrote:
Quote:

Ready for a left-field comment? This shot made me think of the movie Psycho by Alfred Hitchcock. The production designer, Saul Bass, worked with Hitch for a visual motif that is used in most scenes in the film. That visual motif was to have narrow verticle lines, intersecting larger horizontal planes. It was done to subliminally suggest the visual of the human body being stabbed. Such "criss-crossing" indeed results in a "violent" composition and psycholgical turbulence.

Two obvious examples of this motif in action were the opening title sequence (obviously), and the long narrow house on the hill where Norman/Norman's "mother" lived, and the long flat Bates Motel itself. The house was deliberately shaped thin, "pointy" narrow, suggestive of a knife, which in many scenes, was composed to "penetrate" the long flat horizontal line of the Bates Motel, which was a visual metaphore for the human body. Insane Norman "lived" (or was the soul) of the house/knife. The victim's "soul" occupied the motel/body.

Your composition has these identicle elements, intended or otherwise, it is oddly unsettling in that it is a tranquil scene, but the criss-crossing horizontal and verticle lines are suggestive of violence.

Interesting composition, regardless if it was intended or a happy accident. There is a lot going on in this picture - in your subconscious decision to consider it suitable subject matter, and take it in the first place, and your decisions in how it was composed, that speaks about its author. Often our "art" - and our choices when we make it, engages all the mind's components - conscious and otherwise, and puts more of our inner-self on display than we intend it to. ;)

Peaceful, alone in a crowd, but with a lot on her mind. The viewer hopes she finds peace and tranquility.

Thanks for sharing.
Thanks Nick! Now I know why Greta's (Suze) pic gave me the creeps. You're right, there was something unsettling about it, butI couldn't but my knife (er, finger) on it.;)

suze May 14, 2005 9:28 AM

Hopefully this crop works a bit better in terms of removing the crane and changing the centre on the photo. Harjj, it was taken on Torquay by the way - I can't get enough of the seaside so was there every spare second when I visited. I think I do have a few close ups somewhere - will have a look to see if there are any quitable for posting :-)

And Nick, well, what can I say LOL. I liked the juxtaposition . . quiet/busy, old/new, alone/crowded, fast/slow,take your pick - scads of them to be had here. Anything else will have to be taken with a few grains of salt and a bottle of tequila I'm afraid! (Hmmm, does look a bit like the boat from Dead Calm though doesn't it? :evil:)

http://-suze-.smugmug.com/photos/21974158-L-1.jpg

Stoney79 May 14, 2005 11:16 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Here's my suggestion: The boat is on the right side, because it "looks" to the left. The footbridge shouldn't divide the picture in two halfs. So I decided to give the calm lower part more room than the turbulent upper part.

Charlie46227 May 14, 2005 11:20 AM

Well, it looks a little 'happier' now. Perhaps it was just the crane.;) Personally, I'd rather see the image 'landscape' without the water reflection of the lone boat. (please take this opinion with a grain of salt however, since I have NO photography background at all, not even a'intro' class.) Charlie

suze wrote:
Quote:

Hopefully this crop works a bit better in terms of removing the crane and changing the centre on the photo. Harjj, it was taken on Torquay by the way - I can't get enough of the seaside so was there every spare second when I visited. I think I do have a few close ups somewhere - will have a look to see if there are any quitable for posting :-)

And Nick, well, what can I say LOL. I liked the juxtaposition . . quiet/busy, old/new, alone/crowded, fast/slow,take your pick - scads of them to be had here. Anything else will have to be taken with a few grains of salt and a bottle of tequila I'm afraid! (Hmmm, does look a bit like the boat from Dead Calm though doesn't it? :evil:)

http://-suze-.smugmug.com/photos/21974158-L-1.jpg

Ian48Harry May 14, 2005 3:22 PM

Stoney79 wrote:
Quote:

The boat is on the right side, because it "looks" to the left.
Stoney I'm worried - the bow (sharp-end) is to the right, the stern (blunt-end) is to the left - so is it not "looking" to the right.:?

Ian

Or are we talking about a different boat?


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