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-   -   Shooting indoor trains - fz38 help (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/panasonic-leica-29/shooting-indoor-trains-fz38-help-180430/)

eysha Nov 23, 2010 11:12 AM

Shooting indoor trains - fz38 help
 
Hi, this Thursday i am travelling to shoot trains in an indoor museum. I have no idea what the lighting system will be. they are full size trains. I want to get the best shots i can of course as i probably won't get back maybe for a very long time.
What is your advice as to settings for best possible results?
How do i turn the camera back to factory settings to make sure i have no settings stored that might mess things up?
what is the focal length of the fz38? - been reading stuff.
all advice very welcome.
E.

flyhigh Nov 23, 2010 1:12 PM

the best setting to shoot inside that train can best be told when u show us some of the pics if it's indoors. :D joking !

well, if the lighting is adequate, u should still use the widest aperture i.e. 2.8, or most 3.0; i think that will give you max 2x zoom. FZ35 gives best pic @ISO400 or below, but if the pic seems darker, set the max ISO to 800 with auto ISO ON.

with image stabilization, you should hold the cam steady at 1x zoom with 1/15 or 1/20 sec shutter speeds.

you should also try using the auto bracket with a range of -0.66 to +0.66 ev. this with take 3 burst shots with -0.66, 0 & +0.66 ev. this way, you may review the shots and keep the best of them.

also, use flush if required, and set a custom white balance with a piece of white paper or any big white object inside the compartment for one more white balance option.

eysha Nov 23, 2010 1:58 PM

Thanks, should have added i am new to photography so, please don't shoot me, but i really don't understand your post - sorry. I find it way to advanced for me. would love to learn what you mean but at the moment i am lost. this might help:
http://www.nrm.org.uk/
that's the link to where i am going.
Thanks again.
E.

flyhigh Nov 23, 2010 10:17 PM

oops, okay ! let me try more elaborate ..... :)

# set the camera on aperture priority mode, i.e. set the dial knob at the top of camera to "A".
# click "menu" button and set intelligent ISO => "ON" in page 1. now, go to page 2 and set ISO limit set to 400 (you can set this to 800 later if pictures come out too dark at 400).
# press menu button again to exit.
# now, press the Q.Menu joystick button and hold it till some icons appear on screen. push joystick to left/right to go to 2nd icon and select metering mode = center weighted.
press go next icon (3rd) by pushing joystick to right and select spot (focus) by up/down.
4th icon should set to AWB, i.e. auto white balance.
# press joystick at this position to exit this menu.
# now, at the bottom of your screen you can see the F[number] in yellow colour, if its not yellow, then push joystick to left/right till its yellow. pull JS (joystick) all the way down till its F2.8. (you need to make sure currently cam is set to no zoom, i.e. 1x). this F[number] goes higher if you zoom more, your job will be to keep it below F3.0.
# the image stabilizer should be set to auto.


and ta-da ! you are ready to shoot. practice some shooting in decently lit indoors with these settings and share us the outcomes. :) use flash if need.

i suggest you read a bit about the auto bracket as well, cause its very helpful to manipulate the shutter speed. the shortcut key is the top button in the 4 way directional keypad.

frank-in-toronto Nov 24, 2010 8:07 AM

I think you're in trouble. Look at this one:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
he shot it at 1 second at f/2.8 i couldn't see the iso value. if that is the place and you want those shots, it won't be easy.

this one was 4 seconds
http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

if you can bring your tripod and have time to experiment with taking various exposures, i think you'll be ok. you'll catch on after the first few shots what shutter speed to use. if it were me, i would bang off a bunch at f5.6 for some depth of field.
1/60, 1/30, 1/15, 1/8, etc up to 5 seconds or so. then review and see where they look ok.

after that, i would start taking pictures and chimp every one. if it appeared too dark, take another at a little longer exposure. won't be a quick job. post a couple here afterwards. you'll learn a lot.

just checked the other nrm at shildon. maybe the lights are better there but this one was taken at iso 200, 1/6, and f/4 so within reason handheld if you bump the iso way up.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

Clint501 Nov 24, 2010 8:11 AM

The simplest - I'd use the iA mode and flash. Take few then preview them in the camera. If they aren't good enough try the P mode with flash.

Tullio Nov 24, 2010 10:57 AM

Usually museums are lit by tungsten lamps, which most cameras don't handle too well producing warm (orangy) color casts. So, I suggest you either shoot RAW and then adjust the WB in software, use the tungsten preset WB or bring a white sheet of paper with you and manually set the WB once you're inside (best option IMO).

saly Nov 24, 2010 11:02 AM

Eysha, if you see a subject that you really want to capture, I recommend shooting a whole bunch using different settings. Try iA, P, different ISO, different WB, etc. One of them is bound to come out good. I often take 10 to 20 shots of one subject to make sure I get at least one good one.

flyhigh Nov 24, 2010 1:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frank-in-toronto (Post 1170399)
I think you're in trouble. Look at this one:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
he shot it at 1 second at f/2.8 i couldn't see the iso value. if that is the place and you want those shots, it won't be easy.

this one was 4 seconds
http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

if you can bring your tripod and have time to experiment with taking various exposures, i think you'll be ok. you'll catch on after the first few shots what shutter speed to use. if it were me, i would bang off a bunch at f5.6 for some depth of field.
1/60, 1/30, 1/15, 1/8, etc up to 5 seconds or so. then review and see where they look ok.

after that, i would start taking pictures and chimp every one. if it appeared too dark, take another at a little longer exposure. won't be a quick job. post a couple here afterwards. you'll learn a lot.

just checked the other nrm at shildon. maybe the lights are better there but this one was taken at iso 200, 1/6, and f/4 so within reason handheld if you bump the iso way up.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

thanks frank for those sample images, they are very helpful understanding the exact scene there.

2nd pic seems have some good lighting, i am sure aperture priority can manage a good shot @F2.8 with ISO400 and 1/10 - 1/15sec speeds. but 1st picture is a challenging one, with flash the only option. :BANGHEAD2:

using flash with aperture priority at any of these conditions will allow some flexibility in DOF as well, as the aperture can be set @ F4.0 for sharp backgrounds whenever required while camera will handle the shutter speed itself.

clint & saly:
iA and P modes are easier alright, but unlike aperture priority, P or iA don't give the control over DOF - i.e. aperture. it is sure, with low lights camera will itself select F2.8 and there are chances even when using flash, camera will stick to the same F2.8 and will simply increase the shutter speed. also with iA you don't get to choose the focus point either, thats why i prefer aperture priority a lot :D

saly Nov 24, 2010 2:00 PM

Eysha - just thought of something. You should call the museum or check online before you go to see if they have any photography restrictions. Many museums don't allow flash or tripods.


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