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Old Oct 15, 2006, 5:30 PM   #1
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hi, guys. does anyone have any tips for getting these foregrounds to show up, without blowing out the backgrounds? and without pp?

pppfffttt! almost forgot...fz20.

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Old Oct 15, 2006, 9:36 PM   #2
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Sorry I can't give you much help but I do know that some photographers take two or more shots exposing for for the BG and the FG and then do layers in PS. I do not know how to do that but perhaps others can help you.

On shots like that I tend to overexpose and then lighten it in PP. That helps a little.
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Old Oct 16, 2006, 6:08 AM   #3
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Maybe you should consider using a ND Grad filter?
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Old Oct 16, 2006, 7:50 AM   #4
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@tcook

same here, i subscribe to the theory it's much easier to lighten objects through pp. as a matter of fact, i did hit this particular pic with pspx' one step photo fix, and it came out looking pretty good. but i'm really trying to learn howto take good pics in camera, and not relying on pp so much (as i do now).

if you frequent the pspx forums, you may have seen my using layers questions. i've gotten pretty dangerous with the clone tool, but using layers is something that completely escapes me. i understand what they're saying when someone explains it, but i'm having a dickens of a time if i have to figure it out on my own.

@seedubs

i've never heard of an nd grad filter (maybe i've heard of it, but my total noobiness didn't grasp the concept at the time). but rest assured, i will be investigating what it is today. thanks very much for the suggestion.

the reason i'm asking, is I KNOW i saw a very good explanation for taking these shots on either a panasonic forum or one of the online guides. i can picture the pages in my little mind, but i can't remember where i saw it. i've been searching, that's why i turned to you guys. maybe someone can jog me into consciousness.
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Old Oct 16, 2006, 8:27 AM   #5
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That is a very easy photo to fix with the shadow/highlight tool ...or levels or curves......or perhaps fill flash in Elements.



But there are several tutorials for replacing blown skies this is my favorite but there are others.

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/re...essage=5745239

You may want to read this thread...lots of Ideas for fixing blown skies when that is about the only option...but if you do as good as you did with this photo its an easy fix.

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/re...ssage=20456264


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Old Oct 16, 2006, 11:01 AM   #6
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whew! thanks, gene, after reading through those threads, i think i've seen everything you ever wanted to know about fixing/replacing/adjusting the sky. however, and primarily why i read through each post carefully, i'm still looking for techniques on howto take those types of shots properly, so i don't have to resort to post processing.

on the particular day i took that racing picture, i took about 200 shots of various outdoor activities. afterward, i spent about 3 hours fixing flaws such as that one, before uploading them for the family/friends to see. if i could nail the shot on the front end, it would save me a ton of time. and i understand every shot can't be perfect, i'm just trying to eliminate some of my preventable mistakes.

i read through the fz20 manual (again) last night, and it dawned on me i never tried multiple metering all day. i've had so much success with spot metering getting the lighting just the way i want it, i rarely move it. but i do remember moving the crosshair around until i thought i was getting the right balance between the foreground and the sky. i was wrong. consistently (constantly?).
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Old Oct 16, 2006, 12:29 PM   #7
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There is only so much range to a sensor...and its not always possible to nail a shot....if you can do a good as you did with that photo you should be happy.

The reason I included all that stuff about replacing a blown sky, was recovering shadows can lead to bringing out the noise.

But that is the way I usually do,as it is much quicker just to recover some shadows.and the Shadow and highlight tool in PS or the Fill flash setting in Elements can make short work of the shadows.



I have never got a good grip on pattern metering even with a DSLR, but I do pretty well with center weighted metering...I think its why we have all the options what works for me will not necessarily work for you.

IMHO...I also think that Pattern meter leads to fringing ...

I do not know if I added this and I think its what you asked about originally.

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...blending.shtml
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Old Oct 16, 2006, 12:47 PM   #8
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gene +1!

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/understanding-series/understandexposure.shtml

if anyone could find a great tutorial on exposure, i knew gene could. this isn't THE specific article i was thinking of, but it certainly contains everything i was looking for. thanks very much.

edit: i also now understand the grad filter(s) seedubs was talking about.


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Old Oct 18, 2006, 12:27 AM   #9
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Tafugate, what you could try is a neutral density gradual filter in front of the lens; i think it is the only way to have theupper part of the photo darker withoutpp. Works very good with bright cloudy skies. Cokin has some of those: http://www.cokin.com/ico3-p1-6.html

Cheerio! GB
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Old Oct 18, 2006, 12:43 AM   #10
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Thereexist gradual filters, from Cokin for instance, with one half clear and the other half darkened,in various colours. In the analogue days, that was the only convenient (and controlled) way to darken a part of the subject and because (contrary to what many believe) digital photographyis subjectedto all old analogue technical rules they are still fully usable.
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