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Old Oct 31, 2006, 4:14 PM   #1
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Greetings to all fellow panay users,

I am fairly new here, have been reading some posts since last week and this would be my very first post.

I have decided to give myself an early christmas present - FZ7, before this I was a Canon S45 user for 3 years. The camera will arrive in a couple of weeks.

I would like to add a wide angel adaptor to shoot landscapes.

Based on research from this site, I am trying to decide between Olympus WCON 0.7 and Raynox HD 6600 0.66. Of the two, the Raynox is only slightly more expensive than the Olympus. Raynox has front threads for 72mm filter while the Olympus wcon has no front threads. So, for the timing being I am leaning towards the Raynox as I figure it would be useful to use the circular polarizer for landscapes. I am a total newbie on this, so please let me know if my logic is correct here.

Thanks in advance
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Old Oct 31, 2006, 10:00 PM   #2
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I would not worry about the Filter....Its my guess it will cause vignetting with a polarizer.

But I do not have a FZ7 to try it on. WA lenses for the most vignette with a polarizer
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Old Nov 2, 2006, 9:58 AM   #3
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Most WA lenses are designed to cut back on glare caused by light coming from the extremities. Using a polarizer on a WA lens will also cause color variation in the sky because increasing the vista will cause different polarizing affects at the image edges then in the center area. As Gene mention putting any filter on the DCR6600 will cause vignetting. Also if you purchase a polarizer for your standard lens a circular polarizer is the wrong and more expensive choice it should be a Linear Polarizer (PL).
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Old Nov 2, 2006, 12:08 PM   #4
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I agree with Gene and Jerry that a polarizer (or any other lens)will cause vignetting with either of the wa's you mention. You might be able to get away with a polarizer between the camera and wa with a .8x converter such as the oly wcon-08. (I seldom use a polarizer, anyway, preferring to reduce the ev compensation a couple of notches.)

Also be aware that the wcon-07 has 55mm threads and you will need either a step up ring from the 52mm stock fz7 adapter (which may cause vignetting due toplacing it further from the camera lens) or get a 55mm pemaraal fz7 adadpter. The hd6600 is slightly wider and comes in various thread diameters including 52mm and 55mm. That would be my choice for the stock adapter. I have a 52mm 6600 for my fz5 and it works great.
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Old Nov 2, 2006, 5:37 PM   #5
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Thanks for all the replys.

From your feedback, I take it that a polarizer is not a necessity for the WCON, and it may cause distortion and loss of image quality.I am curious though as why some WCON do come with front threads?

I did not expect that the linear polarizer would be a better choice here than the circular one. Most of what I have read is about CP. I guess I will just have to read more about it.


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Old Nov 2, 2006, 5:52 PM   #6
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Quote:
I am curious though as why some WCON do come with front threads?
Good question. A very thin filter or step ring to a much larger size polarizer might not vignett.
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Old Nov 2, 2006, 6:18 PM   #7
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Eric L wrote:
Quote:
Thanks for all the replys.

From your feedback, I take it that a polarizer is not a necessity for the WCON, and it may cause distortion and loss of image quality.I am curious though as why some WCON do come with front threads?

I did not expect that the linear polarizer would be a better choice here than the circular one. Most of what I have read is about CP. I guess I will just have to read more about it.
Many people believe that more money equals better. In this case the linear polarizer is the correct match for all Panasonic FZ cameras because they do not employ mirrors for focusing and viewing. Not only is the linear polarizer cheaper then the circular it is more effective. The other issue you will see beat to death is that a multi-coated UV is better then a UV that has one coat on either side. This is another instance that more money is not better. The dual coated vs. the multi-coated filter will produce identical results i.e. none because that is what a UV produces bellow altitudes of 3000 feet.
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Old Nov 3, 2006, 6:08 PM   #8
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A big thanks to fmoore and lovelife for explaning this.

Lovelife: just one more question on what you mentioned earlier (quotation)

LoveLife wrote:
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Many people believe that more money equals better. In this case the linear polarizer is the correct match for all Panasonic FZ cameras because they do not employ mirrors for focusing and viewing.
What kind of cameras do use mirror to focus? film camera SRLs? I thought all Digital cameras use sensors. Sorry for this poor question.




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Old Nov 3, 2006, 8:14 PM   #9
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Sorry I am a little confused too, I have a circular polorizer and it wasnt expensive, but in order to use it correctly I need to 'rotate' it so that the angle is right against the sun (90 degrees?) you can see the sky darken as you rotate it, so if I had a linear one, how would I reposition it to the correct angle? Sounds confusing but I hope you understand what I mean, because reading that I am not too sure!!! :-)
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Old Nov 3, 2006, 9:00 PM   #10
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Seedubs wrote:
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Sorry I am a little confused too, I have a circular polorizer and it wasnt expensive, but in order to use it correctly I need to 'rotate' it so that the angle is right against the sun (90 degrees?) you can see the sky darken as you rotate it, so if I had a linear one, how would I reposition it to the correct angle? Sounds confusing but I hope you understand what I mean, because reading that I am not too sure!!! :-)
DSLRs Digital single lens reflex use sensors to capture the image not for focusing. SLRs and DSLRs cameras use a mirror focus and light metering systems that flip up during image capture; this function is influenced by polarizing from a linear polarizer. The CPL uses a special layer of wave retardant material which fakes out the focus system by creating depolarization wave lengths but not the effect. The Circular polarizer is a compromise design and is not as effective in the full range of polarization.







Both polarizers function the same way but there is a more dramatic effect achieved by linear polarizers. To get the maximum polarizer effect the sun must be hitting you in the side of your face when you point the camera at your subject. Or to put it another way the sun is at right angle to your subject. That does not mean that you will not get polarization effects at different sun angles but you will get almost none if the sun is hitting you on your back. The ring on the front of both polarizers works the same way by decreasing or increasing the amount of polarization. Size for size the linear is less expensive then the circular model because of the extra layer. Why it is more expensive after all these years there is no reason that is the camera business. Do you think a 67mm filter costs that much more to produce then a 55mm. One more thing if you stack two linear polarizer together you create a variable ND filter which can cut back the light in stages to total blackness. ND filters are used in special situations where you want to use slower shutter speeds to get blurred water falls on a very sunny day.
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