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Old Nov 12, 2006, 8:12 PM   #1
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Here is a shot of our 'in-town' fire lookout tower I shot yesterday. It sits on the edge of a cliff on one side, and I'm down a few feet below the top.

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Old Nov 12, 2006, 8:17 PM   #2
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You can't really make it out very well in the photo above, but right in front of my face where I was standing, there was a really neat pattern in the sandstone rocks that make up the top layer of the cliff face:

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Old Nov 12, 2006, 8:38 PM   #3
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A couple of neat photos to be sure. What is most intriquing about the second photo, is that the two rocks to the left have coninuing patterns, and the two on the right do also. Yet, there are four distinct separate looking rocks, which leads one to believe that at one time they were all one larger rock. But what caused the rift.
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Old Nov 12, 2006, 9:08 PM   #4
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Not sure if your question was rhetorical or not Bayou; but assuming you were interested in an actual answer:

At one time the whole layer of sandstone was probably pretty much a 'solid, flat sheet' lying hundreds of feet lower elevation ... Then, due to volcanic activity , it was lifted from beneath, sort of balancing on the rising igneous molten rock beneath it.

All kinds of mechanical forces could account for breaking: from the original 'event' that lifted it, local faulting, earthquakes, Softer rock or sediments being eroded from beneath and the weight of the sheet itself breaking itself. Water seeping into microscopic cracks and freezing causing the cracks to spread further.

In this particular case it could even be the rocks were broken during the construction of the tower.
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Old Nov 12, 2006, 9:23 PM   #5
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Thanks, I was interested as to why they were separate. Your answer seems perfectly logical to me and explains what I thought. That it was indeed once all connected. And the fact that water freezes in between is a very plausible explanation for the distinct separation.

Thanks again.

Jerry.

P.S. Was definitely asking, and hoping you might know why such a thing would occur. I had heard of such, but had not seen photos of it.

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Old Nov 12, 2006, 10:51 PM   #6
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Interesting shots, the markings almost look like hieroglyphics.
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Old Nov 14, 2006, 6:36 AM   #7
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nice shots and I like #2 too with all of the interesting patterns.
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