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Old Dec 17, 2006, 4:40 PM   #1
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I am attempting to use the High Dynamic Range function in my software to show the shadow detail and still maintain the highlight detail in shots such as this. This was my first attempt and I only used two shots when I should have used at least three (guess I should read the instructions). I would have liked the sky and clouds in this shot to have been a little darker. I always have trouble shooting nice blue skies with detailed clouds without the shadow detail being to dark. I hope this helps solve some of that problem.





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Old Dec 17, 2006, 7:53 PM   #2
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A good start...

Which software are you using for the HDR?
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Old Dec 17, 2006, 10:01 PM   #3
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Thanks David, I am using PhotoImpact 11. From what I read it has one of the better and easiest to use HDR functions. It's is just a mater of getting the shots right and then the camera puts them together.
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Old Dec 17, 2006, 11:19 PM   #4
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Looks good to me. Did you say that is done in camera? If so I'm going to have to read my manual again.

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Old Dec 18, 2006, 2:09 AM   #5
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Sorry if I was not clear Don but, it is don with the software I use which is PhotoImpact 11. I am sure PS and other software packages do the same thing.
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Old Dec 18, 2006, 2:14 AM   #6
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Nice attempt. I reckon as you say you may have needed at least one more shot with the exposure down at least 1 and possibly 2 to get the sky in. The detail on the light and shadow areas of your picture though is really good.

I was actually having a play with the trial version of easyHDR yesterday for a no flash indoor shot with plenty of light coming in through the window and was tempted to buy the software just to get the watermark off I liked it so much. Can't post as I am hoping to use it for the panachallenge.
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Old Dec 18, 2006, 4:17 AM   #7
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The shot looks great, and I wouldn't have been able to tell if this is a HDR hadn't you told me. So what you tried to do worked out great.

If you are going to use more shots, with more spread in ev, you'll get more detail but (imho) loose the real world look.

an example of such a 'unreal' shot is next one, it looks good but for me completely unreal.



So again using hdr to get more dr without destroying the 'real world' look your shot is great.

Ronny
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Old Dec 18, 2006, 6:29 AM   #8
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Not sure what High Dynamic Range is? Can someone explain, just briefly, what it is? thanks
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Old Dec 18, 2006, 7:02 AM   #9
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Hope that I don't make any mistakes with this one (any help or corrections are appreciated)

A human eye has an equivalent of about 15 f stops, a camera is around 10 f stops. So we see always more detail than the camera can.

To get over this limitation hdr was started, a collection of shots of the same subject at different ev's is put together to simulate the range we can see.

Normally this is done by taking pictures in autobracket mode. These pictures are then put together into one imagefile that contains all the visible data. (a .hdr extension).
This hdr file can't be shown on a monitor or in a jpg because they don't support the range.

So to get a hdr file visible you have to scale it down again to the 10 stop range, this is done by compressing some fstops in 1 stop. (called tone mapping) So the endresult contains more information than a standard jpg and simulates a larger dynamic range than it is.


Ronny


(edit) just forgot this, I use mostly photoshop to construct the hdr file and then Photomatix to do the tonemapping. If you want to try it yourself photomatix can be used for both only it places a grid on top of the final image. http://www.hdrsoft.com/
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Old Dec 18, 2006, 8:03 AM   #10
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I've used the function in my Helicon program but as soon as B&H gets the CokinGraduated ND Filters back in stock I am going to get a set. I had such a hard time with the very bright sky on my trip to the Hill Country that I started reading up and think that might be just the ticket to some better photos under those conditions.

Don



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Looks good to me. Did you say that is done in camera? If so I'm going to have to read my manual again.

Don
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