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Old Jan 1, 2007, 11:13 AM   #1
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Ok, I'm nuts and just sold my beloved FZ-7 and ordered a FZ-50. As I'm waiting for delivery can anyone tell me what the flash trigger voltage is for the FZ-50? I have a Minolta Auto 132X flash unit that measures a trigger voltage of 2vdc that I'd like to use with the FZ-50. If someone could peek into their owners manual I'd appreciate it.





Thanks.
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Old Jan 1, 2007, 11:33 AM   #2
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All the FZ cameras can use up to 24 volt Trigger voltage,so in that regard you should be fine.

And I do not think your nuts at all , while I did not feel a need to move to the FZ50 from the FZ30 many others did and are quite happy with their choice.
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Old Jan 1, 2007, 11:52 AM   #3
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Cool. Then it should work fine with the FZ50. :|



Thanks for your response.
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Old Jan 2, 2007, 12:48 AM   #4
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its 2.2 volt so should be ok

http://www.botzilla.com/photo/strobeVolts.html

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Old Jan 9, 2007, 7:35 AM   #5
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Follow-up:

Received my FZ50 yesterday. The Flash works fine with it. :|



Thanks again.


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Old Jan 9, 2007, 8:28 AM   #6
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let us know how the flaash works out too lol

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Old Jan 9, 2007, 8:33 PM   #7
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Flash is short range (30 - 50 ft) but it flashes. It was a freebie hand me down from my father so it's good for now until my money tree grows up.

That reminds me, I better get to watering that darn tree.:G
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Old Jan 10, 2007, 7:52 AM   #8
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Glad it works.....just for the record a flash is usually only effective for about 1/2 the guide #, for instance a 383 has a guide # of 120 feet....but somewhere in the manual it says theeffective range is60 ft .....and that is pushing it., so if your flash works at 50 ft you are fine.
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Old Jan 10, 2007, 9:09 PM   #9
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Thanks for the input. I did a web search and found that the 132 X has a guide # of 32, so that's about 105 feet making the efffective range per your posting to be 52.5 feet. I believe the guide # on the FL50 is 50 meters, doing the match in a fuzzy rounding sort of way, that would boil down the effective range to 82 feet. A gain of 30 feet. Cool to know. Plus the TTL and swivel head feature.

Yup.. Still want it.:G


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Old Jan 10, 2007, 9:17 PM   #10
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genece wrote:
Quote:
Glad it works.....just for the record a flash is usually only effective for about 1/2 the guide #, for instance a 383 has a guide # of 120 feet....but somewhere in the manual it says theeffective range is60 ft .....and that is pushing it., so if your flash works at 50 ft you are fine.
I think (unless I misread what you wrote) that you might be confused about what the guide number is supposed to signify. It really doesn't refer directly to the range of the flash, rather it refers to the strength of the flash and the units of measurement.(Of course, the strength of the flash does ultimately determine its range.) The guidenumber is usually given asa number, a unit of measurement, and an ISO rating. For instance, it might say guide number of 120 (feet) at ISO 100. Thismeans that if your subject is 12 feet away, you would use an aperture of f-10 (120/12) . If the subject is 25 feet away, you would use f-4.8 (120/25). You divide the guide number by the distance to your subject to obtain the f-stop. If the flash gives the guide numbers in both feet and meters, the one for meters will be about one-third of the one for feet, since a meter is about 3 feet.

If you tried to shoot a subject 120 feet away, you would need a very fast lens, as in f-1.0. (120/120 = 1.0) Wish I had a lens like that!! In this example, with an FZ with an f-2.8 lens, the max effective distance for this flash at ISO 100 would be 120/2.8, or approximately 43 feet. Of course, if you wanted to use a smaller aperture (larger f-stop number), the range would decrease.

I hope this helps to explain guide numbers a little. These concepts are what I learned about 40 or so years ago with old film cameras, when film speed was measured in ASA instead of ISO, but I think the basic principles still apply.
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