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Old Jan 26, 2007, 4:57 PM   #11
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Oaks are not native to Australia so we only have them in cities etc. We have a beautiful Oak lawn in the Royal Botanical Gardens with some wonderful specimens. I'll have to go and take some shots to post for you. Maybe in autum, when the leaves are turning.
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Old Jan 26, 2007, 5:27 PM   #12
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Lovely scenic shot! Donna
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Old Jan 26, 2007, 8:09 PM   #13
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Is that similar to an English Oak Jerry with acorns etc. It doesn't strike me as being the same....probably the size

Fred
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Old Jan 26, 2007, 9:38 PM   #14
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Thanks Donna, appreciate the comment and veiwing. Took photos of a few local oaks today, first sun we have in a while . Haven't had a chance to work with them.
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Old Jan 26, 2007, 9:53 PM   #15
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Fred, thanks for viewing. I took quite a few photos of local Live Oaks here, but have not yet had time to peruse them as we rode horses this evening. Anyway, yes, they do produce acorns, but I believe they may be larger than the English oak.

The info below is from a website about the Live Oak which grows abundantly here in the Southeastern U.S. I had 3 about 50 years old, but lost them to Hurricanne Andrew in in 1992. I do still have two Water Oaks.

On the Gulf Coast, live oaks often support many types of epiphytic plants, including Spanish moss (Tillandsia usneoides) which hangs in weeping garlands, giving the trees a striking appearance. Live oak is a fast-growing tree. Sweet edible acorns are usually produced in great abundance and are of value to many birds and mammals including wild turkeys, wood ducks, jays, quail, whitetail deer, raccoons, and squirrels.

The yellowish-brown wood is hard, heavy, tough, strong, and is used for structural beams, shipbuilding, posts, and in places requiring strength and durability. The trees have been historically planted in cities. When planting live oak, it should be restricted to large yards or parks where the spreading form can be accommodated.

Live oak ranks as one of the heaviest native hardwoods, weighing 55 pounds per cubic foot when air dry. This weight or density makes live oak a good fuel wood although it can be very difficult to split.

The national champion live oak was discovered in 1976 near Louisburg, Louisiana. It had a diameter of 11.65', height of 55', and crown spread of 132'. The Florida champion live oak, as given in the 1984 revised list, was found in Alachua County and measured 108" in diameter, 83' in height, and had a spread 150.5'.








Identifying Characteristics

Size/Form:
Live oak is a large tree that reaches heights of 65' to 85'. It has a wide spreading crown and is buttressed and flared at the base of the trunk.

Leaves:
The leaves are simple, alternately arranged, and may persist on the tree through winter until they gradually fall as new leaves emerge in the spring. The leaves are 2" to 5" long by ½" to 2 ½" wide. The narrowly to broadly elliptical shaped leaves are usually stiff and leathery. The upper surface is shiny, dark green. The leaves are dull grayish green underneath. The leaf base is tapering and the tip is short pointed to rounded. The margin is smooth and slightly wavy.

Fruit:
The acorns are ¾" to 1" long, broadest at the base to almost uniformly wide and rounded to pointed at the tip. Acorns are light brown within the cap that covers ¼ of the dark nut. The largest part of the acorn is dark brown to black and shiny. They occur solitary or in clusters of three to five nuts, and they mature in one season on the current year's branchlets.

Bark:
The dark brown to reddish-brown bark is thick with shallow furrows and roughly ridged, eventually becoming blocky with age.

Habitat:
Inhabiting a wide variety of sites, you can find live oak in almost pure stands, or scattered in mixed woodlands, hammocks, flatwoods, borders of salt marshes, roadsides, city lots, and commonly scattered in pastures. Live oak is found growing in association with several other hardwoods, including the water oak, laurel oak, sweetgum, southern magnolia, and American holly.







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Bark


Leaves and twigs


Acorn


Live vs. Laurel oak
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Old Jan 27, 2007, 12:00 PM   #16
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wow gerry, that is a beautiful tree!!! and I imagine if it could talk that it would have a million stories to tell about stories from the past!!!!
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Old Jan 27, 2007, 12:50 PM   #17
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Thanks, Annie. Yesterday, was one of the rare days, we had a little sunshine. Took a few photos of local oaks, but have not yet processed. Thanks for viewing and commenting.
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Old Jan 27, 2007, 8:19 PM   #18
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Jerry (hope this isn't a double post), the Oak does appear to be different from the English Oak. Picture of leaves below


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Old Jan 27, 2007, 8:28 PM   #19
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Yes, they are different, shape of leaves and acorns. In my Nottoway posts you can see more of these Live Oaks. Plan to post a few more soon.
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Old Jan 29, 2007, 10:33 AM   #20
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Very interesting picture and subject Jerry. Definitely an eye catcher.I was wondering how the picture would look ifa longer section of theroad leading to the tree was included in the photograph.

Emmanuel
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