Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Panasonic / Leica

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jan 29, 2007, 9:46 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
deterpawson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 393
Default

hello
enclosed are some pix i snapped on the spur of the moment kinda thing.
pls keep in mind that i am a 100% amatuer at clicking & snapping.
taken a algonquin park, ontario, canada.
with my daughters sony dsc-p52. 3.2 mp camera.
no digital enhancements whatsoever, taken on auto settings.
any opinions?
basically what im looking for is wheteher anyone thinks i have a good camera eye.
the theory and computer techno stuff i can always learn.
bruttaly honest feedback ( without destructive criticisms) are gratefully welcome.
thanks
pete

Attached Images
 
deterpawson is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jan 29, 2007, 10:58 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Raghu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Ambattur, near Chennai, India
Posts: 3,656
Default

My really honest opinion is that even the "camera eye" can be learnt!
Raghu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 29, 2007, 11:57 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
squirl033's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 6,720
Default

without getting into technicalities like exposure and sharpness, this is a nice serene image, but to me, it lacks a focal point. it's not clear whether you were shooting the trees, the lake, the lily pads, or what. as a matter of composition, at least until/unless you decide to pursue the"fine art" side of photography, i think you'll get the most pleasing results by having a definite subject inyour photos. a pretty picture of an expanse of landscape may be calm and pastoral, but if there's nothing in it to grab and hold a viewer's attention, it will seldom get more than a passing glance.always try to have aprimary point of interest - a specific subject - for your photos,and try to keep your compositions relatively simple so viewers can easily see what it is you were trying to capture without being distracted by background elements or having to guess what your picture is all about.

a "good camera eye" can be learned, but it does take practice...
squirl033 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 30, 2007, 12:00 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,336
Default

I can see what you liked about the scene, it is quite appealing. However the resultant photo is a bit flat and lifeless. The horizon is tilted and the sky does not hold much interest as it is a bit overexposed. You have actually chosen a tough target as the sky is very bright in comparison to the fliage on the other side of the lake which is quite dark and then some of the reflections are bright again. The limitations of a digital camera are that it cannot cover the same 'dynamic range' as your eye and hence the sky and reflections in the lake end up being overexposed and too white compared to what your eye saw. In this photo you could have underexposed more but that would have made the trees darker and perhaps too dark. Also the framing is again very centred. Look up the 'rule of thirds' as a guide.

A lot of this stuff is learnt over time, and then you will get more and more shots right. I would suggets you keep shotting and trying to develop an 'eye' by having a look at other peoples photos, seeing what you like, perhaps reading some books and web site articles etc.

I am merely months ahead of you on the journey and still at the stage where the shots I throw away significantly outnumber shots I keep, but the I console myself ratio is moving in the right direction.
rafinmelb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 30, 2007, 10:45 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
bayourebel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,561
Default

Hi, Pete. I have been at it a year this month and I too am still learning the process of achieveing a quality photo. I discard 100 or more to one keeper. Then try my hand at some post processing. The thing that causes me most trouble is focus and getting a sharp photo. I played with your photo somewhat in PE4. Adjusted levels some and tilted the horizon 1 degree right. Others on here can do a much better job than I can, but it also gives me practice. Hope you don't mind, but here is what I came out with.


Attached Images
 
bayourebel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 30, 2007, 4:59 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,336
Default

And just to temper what anybody on-line might say. Here are why the 'rules' we may talk about should only be guidelines. In the end it is about what YOU find pleasing and want to achieve.

http://theonlinephotographer.blogspo...-internet.html
rafinmelb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 30, 2007, 5:47 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
deterpawson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 393
Default

thanks everybody,
i am truly amazed at the feedback , and i appreciate it, what really struck me was that everyone put sincere thought into their criticisms, and that is admirable.
i will do my darndest to read more and educate myself so that i can be more focussed.
i really wasnt focussed coz the trip was an an adventure for us and we were in a big group so all i did was point and shoot and whatever scenic view i found.
i appreciate the feedback and i will send some more after a alittle self education.
you people have been wonderful.
happy clicking.
sincerely
pete
deterpawson is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:01 PM.