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Old Apr 3, 2007, 2:46 PM   #21
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Were you using autofocus on the camera or was it set to manual?
I found that using the camera`s autofocus with the DCR150 was very hit and miss, its far more consistent to set the camera to manual and move the camera slightly towards, or away from the subject to focus.


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Old Apr 3, 2007, 4:26 PM   #22
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Mark H wrote:
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Were you using autofocus on the camera or was it set to manual?
I found that using the camera`s autofocus with the DCR150 was very hit and miss, its far more consistent to set the camera to manual and move the camera slightly towards, or away from the subject to focus.


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I was on Manual, and it was shot at 1/200 sec at f/11. And yeah that's exactly what I was doing, moving the camera back and forth from the subject.
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Old Apr 3, 2007, 4:54 PM   #23
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Right. Just had to ask because I had lots of pics turn out like this before I sussed out the manual focus method.
The subject is adequately lit so I wouldnt say the flash is at fault in any way.My guess is that you moved fractionally when you pressed the shutter.....I do that a lot too, so a lot of my pics come out slightly out of focus.
Moving subjects don`t help much either, often moving out of focus while youre taking the shot....that may have been what happened in your pic also.
I`ve managed a few reasonable shots of Woodlice recently (theye were the only macro subjects around at the time)which don`t tend to stay still for very long. I found that by getting them in frame with the zoom backed off slightly, you can track them as they move, then if they momentarily stop, you can zoom in, fine tune the focus and snap a couple of shots. It doesn`t always work but at times it`s effective.I`ve attached one of the pics which came out ok using this method.
The Ladybird shots here are the pick of about 150 altogether, a lot of which weren`t focussed properly.....either the body was focussed instead of the head, focus was in front of the subject, or the wind blew just as I pressed the shutter.
I tend to focus past where I want the part in focus to be, then back off very very slightly taking shots as I go, usually one or two are focussed where I want them to be...the rest go in the recycle bin.The more shots you take the more chance of getting the one you want basically.
Some of these shots were also taken with the help of a tripod, resting on 2 legs so I could pivot it back and forth, while slightly panning the head to keep the subject near centre of the frame. That helps a great deal when the subject is at an awkward height to hold the camera steady. I just set the legs to roughly the height I want to be, then fine tune the height with the centre column once I get the subject in the frame.Others with steadier hands than myself use a monopod in the same way,Bob Frank for one, who posts some awesome macros on here.

I hope some of this has been of help, I know how frustrating macros can be.

Mark
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Old Apr 3, 2007, 5:04 PM   #24
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Thanks Mark for the suggestions. I will for sure try some of your techniques next time. All I know is the more I do macros (especially insects) the better I'll get at it. Next time I got out I'll bring my monopod as well and hopefully that will help with the blurry shots I've been having.
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Old Apr 3, 2007, 5:11 PM   #25
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I`ve found spiders are great to practice your focussing skills on, as in most cases they just sit there eyeballing you as long as you dont actually touch them. Also, prolific species such as Woodlice are good practice too because there are usually plenty to shoot...as opposed to trying to shoot an individual insect that scurries off after you`ve taken 2 shots, reducing your chance of getting a good image,and not giving you a lot of practice at the same time!! :-)

Look forward to seeing your future macro shots,

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